FISHER Grandma and Grandpa Bear Details (Fireplace Series)

  • Active since 1995, Hearth.com is THE place on the internet for free information and advice about wood stoves, pellet stoves and other energy saving equipment.

    We strive to provide opinions, articles, discussions and history related to Hearth Products and in a more general sense, energy issues.

    We promote the EFFICIENT, RESPONSIBLE, CLEAN and SAFE use of all fuels, whether renewable or fossil.
You should cut bricks with a masonry saw to fit so they are all held together tight. Or you can fill the gap with sand since you should let the ash pack on the bottom and leave about an inch of ash to burn on when cleaning it out. You'll never see it. You normally need to cut a strip for the front brick on each side, so it's not a big deal to cut more for across the front. They cut very easily.
 
I would replace only broken or cracked bricks. You can flip the bricks if that side looks better. It's always easier to reuse bricks that are cut but if you decide to replace I use a homemade table saw made of plywood and and old circular saw with a masonry blade. Slow but effective.
If the inside of the firebox is rusted maybe a coat of brush on Stove Bright would be a good idea.
 
Hello everyone,I'm new to this so here it go's. My name is Bob and I was the first paid welder for the Fisher stove works in N.H.We were the first franchise that Bob&Carol; sold to Arnold Dunagan from Eugene,Or.around 1975-76 and contrary to all stories heard about the design of the Grandpappa-Bear,A.Dunagan charged me $400.00 for distorting 2 baby-bear stoves.I welded two of them together.1-right hand and 1-left hand model.And I said the fireplace model should look similar.With that I was informed that I just ruined two stoves.I then went on to work for Aurther Hicks and Gerald Jolicure at the Warner Stove Co.in Warner,N.H.,I then moved to Maryland and formed the Chesapeake Stove Works,Inc. In BelAir,MD.
:coolsmile:

I know this is an old thread but I couldn't resist replying.
Chesapeake Stove Works use to be in White Marsh Mall near where I lived. That was my favorite store! Whenever my wife would lose me in the mall she always knew where to find me. I bought more than one Swiss Army Knife there.
 
Last edited:
The previous owner of my 76 grandma bear added a rope gasket to the doors, then removed the gasket because he couldn't get the doors to close properly. I have no idea how much force was applied to the door handle but the door latch is very tricky to open.

How should the door latch (the 1/2" round bar) be bent on the back side so that the door latches properly? This is what mine looks like now.

FISHER Grandma and Grandpa Bear Details (Fireplace Series)
FISHER Grandma and Grandpa Bear Details (Fireplace Series)
 
Apply heat and bend until it's working properly and both handles are at the same angle. I did this on the last stove I had. A propane torch will work but takes a while to heat up.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Todd67
Thanks Don. I was wondering if the tip of the handle should be bent more towards the door, more than it is in the 2nd picture I posted.
 
Very nice Grandpa Bear! Not sure how rare it is, but those doors are not as common as the standard FISHER doors, at least not from what I've seen. But Coaly is the Fisher Stove guru.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Draft
Very rare. I've only seen a couple. I don't know the story of those doors.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Todd67
Another oddity worth mentioning is a few made wider than normal requiring these arched longer hinge plates. Notice the upper door hinge ears don't sit on the hinge plates to support the door weight. The plates are welded OUTSIDE the door hinges. I saw a Grandma like this once and thought it was a manufacturer error. So far, this variation has been stoves manufactured by the Dunn Brothers in VA and W. VA.
See outboard hinges on my clone stove. Same opening dimensions as Grandma Stove.
 

Attachments

  • FISHER Grandma and Grandpa Bear Details (Fireplace Series)
    stove2.jpg
    142.9 KB · Views: 421
  • Like
Reactions: Todd67
Another oddity worth mentioning is a few made wider than normal requiring these arched longer hinge plates. Notice the upper door hinge ears don't sit on the hinge plates to support the door weight. The plates are welded OUTSIDE the door hinges. I saw a Grandma like this once and thought it was a manufacturer error. So far, this variation has been stoves manufactured by the Dunn Brothers in VA and W. VA.
Like this.
 

Attachments

  • FISHER Grandma and Grandpa Bear Details (Fireplace Series)
    IMG_20201107_104418.jpg
    118.1 KB · Views: 386
I have a Fisher wood stove but I have no idea when it was manufactured. I’m sure it’s the grandpa bear version based on what I’ve read that y’all posted. But none of the pics posted match mine. Can y’all help me out in figuring out when it was manufactured? I’m sure it’s not an original being it has no stars on the doors but does have patent pending under the drafts. I want to completely refurnish it including new bricks. I would love to do the glass doors instead but I want originals or close to them. Thank you in advance for the help! I’ve attached the best pics I could get.

DC97EF50-3BD6-4429-B31A-7686E5369C26.jpeg FCFC4B07-4F0D-4B5E-81FA-CD5001CAF06C.jpeg 1F4EB6F7-B515-44CE-8407-DADE3FD241FC.jpeg 1305A791-57D3-4BED-8EA9-6C89FE90B796.jpeg D2FE01BC-5FF6-415D-AEE6-314224A9362C.jpeg CEFB9A38-AD7F-4CE3-922C-9B5D429511B9.jpeg 38C0EFD1-C939-4727-B1A2-028B07C46911.jpeg FISHER Grandma and Grandpa Bear Details (Fireplace Series) FISHER Grandma and Grandpa Bear Details (Fireplace Series)
 
I have a Fisher wood stove but I have no idea when it was manufactured. I’m sure it’s the grandpa bear version based on what I’ve read that y’all posted. But none of the pics posted match mine. Can y’all help me out in figuring out when it was manufactured? I’m sure it’s not an original being it has no stars on the doors but does have patent pending under the drafts. I want to completely refurnish it including new bricks. I would love to do the glass doors instead but I want originals or close to them. Thank you in advance for the help! I’ve attached the best pics I could get.

View attachment 296258 View attachment 296259 View attachment 296260 View attachment 296261 View attachment 296262 View attachment 296263 View attachment 296264 View attachment 296265 View attachment 296266
Looks like an old time Grandpa Bear. This is my old time Grandma Bear.

FISHER Grandma and Grandpa Bear Details (Fireplace Series)
 
Late ‘77 to ‘78 Grandpa I. (Earlier would have early stainless springs, later will have 5 fin air dampers when the 4 fins ran out) After this time period brick retainers went to one piece angle iron replacing the brick clips used on this one.

Bricks look very usable.
 
Hello!

I am pretty sure I have a Grandma Bear Fisher stove, but would like to have some glass doors. I have seen several photos of Fishers with glass doors (like those found here), but can't seem to find any anywhere online. Anyone have any information on where/how to get them? Thank you.
 
Since the Everything Fisher thread has so much hard to find information, I'll start a thread with detailed info on each model as I put it together.​
Anyone needing information on their Grandma or Grandpa double door stove is likely to find it here. Please ask if you don't find what you need !​
Grandma UL Unlisted pre 1980 with 2 square doors;​
Width ; 25 1/2" across top plate.​
Depth ; 28 1/4" overall with ash fender (shelf)​
Height ; 30 1/2" rear, 24 1/2" front​
Approx. weight 406 pounds​
Logs to 20" across stove​
Heats approx. 1500 s.f.​
Requires 5 bricks across back, 4 sides​
Flue size 8 inch top or rear​
Door opening ; 17" wide X 10 1/2" high​
Measurements from original 1977 prints, weight from ad; Dec. 1979​
Grandpa UL Unlisted pre 1980 with 2 square doors;​
Width ; 29 1/2" across top plate.​
Depth ; 30 1/2" overall with ash fender (shelf)​
Approx. weight 454 pounds​
Logs to 24" across stove​
Heats approx. 2000 s.f.​
Requires 6 bricks across back, 4 sides​
Flue size 8 inch top or rear​
Door opening ; 22" wide X 11" high​
Measurements from original 1977 prints, weight from ads; 1978​
The first double door stoves were made in Oregon in 1976. Jake Jackson was a neighbor (his stove patent has his address very close to Bob) and he asked Bob to build him parts for an outdoor barbeque. After the project, he ended up selling Jake a license to build Fisher Stoves in Redmond OR, and loaned him $1000 for his first steel order. Jake later had a customer want a double door stove to view the fire, and brought the idea to Bob Fisher's shop. Bob wanted no part of more cast door patterns, and knew the stove wouldn't be as efficient as his 6 inch vented single door stoves. Public demand (and Bob's wife Carol) caused the need for a "Fireplace Model". Bob took a ride to Redmond and found Jake selling an adaptation of his stove with double doors. They agreed to terminate his license to build Fisher Stoves after Jake fulfilled his stove orders. This wasn't far from Springfield where they both lived, and Bobs "factory" was now in Eugene. So that's where the first ones were produced. Jake went on to build the Frontier Stove line and their friendship lasted until Jake's death many years later. Fisher called the new line the "Fireplace Series". These have an 8 inch outlet compared to the single door "Bear Series" 6 inch outlet stoves. Available in top or rear discharge, best for placing the rear outlet type on a hearth exiting up the existing flue.​
The Grandpa Bear was the largest at the time, only one other Fisher model, the XL was ever made larger.Grandpa measures 29 1/2 inches across the top plate, with the box measuring 28" wide X 23" deep. Comfortable heating 2000 s.f. as suggested in Fisher literature, the stove is capable of even more.​
The first stoves had stars on the doors, and a 76 in the largest star on the right door. Like all other Fisher Stoves with solid cast iron doors, they do not use gasket material for a door seal ! The first door hinge ears were not drilled completely through for the common 3/8 round head rivet used as a hinge pin. These had a pressed in pin pressed into the bottom of the door hinge ear, so the doors could be lifted off without loosing pins, since the idea of double doors was to be able to view the fire with the use of a fire screen attached to the front of the stove.​
In July of 1977 a revision was made for adding a rear and bottom heat shield made of 20 Ga. Cold Rolled Steel. This was designated as a model II on the prints. A notation on the drawing states the shields are not required when installed on a hearth in front of a fireplace.​
In 1979 a Roman Numeral III was added and the door style was available in the original square with flat top, OR with a new arched top style, called "Cathedral". UL Listed stoves from 1980 on had integral shields with bent corners instead of welded angle iron corners that became the legs. A baffle was added for smoke reduction and optional nickel or brass plated doors became available in the cathedral style in 1980 until end of production in 1988.​
Many fabricators continued to produce the old style stove with angle iron corners that was not UL Listed $100 cheaper than the Listed model for installation on non combustible hearth.​
Leg options became available in 1980 shown in brochure as Straight, Furniture, and Bear Leg below;​
The III was later offered with Brass and Glass, and later the Model IV with larger glass was added..​
Attached Files:
Early 76 Grandpa, Pre 1980 Grandpa,
Metallic Brown Grandma III, Grandma IV (with larger glass)

View attachment 64924View attachment 64925View attachment 64926View attachment 64927
The 1976 Fisher I just obtained does not have brass knobs - but has the stainless handles as shown in the second photo. The legs have no balls at all. Just thought I would share. I am new here and it seems Coaly, that you like to collect info on these old Fishers.
 
Hello!

I am pretty sure I have a Grandma Bear Fisher stove, but would like to have some glass doors. I have seen several photos of Fishers with glass doors (like those found here), but can't seem to find any anywhere online. Anyone have any information on where/how to get them? Thank you.
Stoves built with solid doors have air intakes on the doors. Stoves built for glass doors have air intakes through the stove body as well as air wash intakes over glass to keep glass clean. The Grandmas made after 1980 with glass were first the Grandma III, and later the IV had larger glass openings. These stoves have primary side air intakes and air wash controls under doors in the form of slider controls. Stoves are designed and made for glass doors, they are not an option.
 
  • Like
Reactions: GummyBear
Stoves built with solid doors have air intakes on the doors. Stoves built for glass doors have air intakes through the stove body as well as air wash intakes over glass to keep glass clean. The Grandmas made after 1980 with glass were first the Grandma III, and later the IV had larger glass openings. These stoves have primary side air intakes and air wash controls under doors in the form of slider controls. Stoves are designed and made for glass doors, they are not an option.
Dang! Thank you very much for explaining that!