Fisher Identification Request

Jrgray6

New Member
Jan 19, 2020
2
Alexandria, OH
Hey all, looking for some help as my a Fisher wood stove does not match any of the dimensions that I’ve been able to find here. It’s similar to a Grandpa Bear stove, but the dimensions are larger... Pictures are attached and here are the exterior measurements:

32 1/4” Across the top plate (31” across main body)
24 1/2” Tall
20 3/4” Deep
8” Flue

My Grandfather built the house I live in from 1978 to 1980, and installed this stove new at some point during the build. Please let me know if any further information is needed. Thanks!
 

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Todd67

Minister of Fire
Jun 25, 2012
938
Northern NY
Welcome to the forum!

Looks like a Grandpa Bear to me. They aren't all made to the exact same dimensions. The only stove that is bigger than the Grandpa Bear is the rare XL, and it has a 10" flue.
 

Jrgray6

New Member
Jan 19, 2020
2
Alexandria, OH
Welcome to the forum!

Looks like a Grandpa Bear to me. They aren't all made to the exact same dimensions. The only stove that is bigger than the Grandpa Bear is the rare XL, and it has a 10" flue.
Ok, I was under the impression that they were all the same size. Thanks for the reply
 

Todd67

Minister of Fire
Jun 25, 2012
938
Northern NY
Ok, I was under the impression that they were all the same size. Thanks for the reply
You're welcome. Do a search on this forum for a Fisher XL. The doors will have a big sunburst pattern on them, if I remember correctly.
 

coaly

Fisher Moderator
Staff member
Dec 22, 2007
4,053
NE PA
They weren't all exactly built the same because each licensed fabricator across the country as well as each welder could have their own favorite way of doing things.
That is what I call the "wide body". Could be for bricks to fit differently, making it easier to brick, or fitting a bit larger log. Someone could have even cut a few tops wrong and used the material making larger stoves. Just not sure.
Notice the door hinge plates need to be welded on backwards facing inward instead of outward as designed to reach the door hinge ears.
The Dunn Brothers in VA and W. VA made some so wide they made their own hinge plates L shaped.
No matter how they made them, they always have to make the same size doors work.
 

Hissypants

New Member
Dec 13, 2020
2
New York State
I'm so glad I found this thread!! I believe.....I have a grandpa sibling to this stove! I've been reading all the sizes but mine is also 32" wide, 26-3/4" deep including the ash shelf, 30/24 inches high and the opening is 19-5/8w, 9-1/4h. 6 bricks across the back and only 1 row. Sides have 2 rows, it have an 8" rear opening. Currently has no smoke shelf or baffle. The flue can get REALLY hot!! Is there a way to add either of those? Any guess to age? Thanks so much in advance

IMG_20201213_183024271.jpg IMG_20201213_182922376.jpg IMG_20201213_183123862.jpg
 

coaly

Fisher Moderator
Staff member
Dec 22, 2007
4,053
NE PA
78 or 79. Before that door handles were straight. Around that time air dampers went to 5 fin so this was built while they were using up the old 4 fin that was the design Bob’s dad invented and patented as the air intake damper.

A smoke shelf baffle is not difficult. It should set on the rear brick retainers and be angled upward towards the front pointed toward the lower bend in top. Make a template with cardboard. You can cut it down or add to it with tape easily until you get the correct size. The larger the chimney the larger the space needs to be to allow more heat up. So an insulated flue straight up with no bends needs the least amount of heat and can be adjusted to the minimum space, even larger toward the front. Just measure the slot the Smoke travels through for the square inch area needed.

The main thing is making the square inch area the smoke travels through no smaller than the pipe and flue square inch diameter. The baffle is adjusted for the chimney, not the stove for best efficiency. So first measure the chimney flue diameter keeping the “smoke space” opening no less square inches.
 
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Hissypants

New Member
Dec 13, 2020
2
New York State
78 or 79. Before that door handles were straight. Around that time air dampers went to 5 fin so this was built while they were using up the old 4 fin that was the design Bob’s dad invented and patented as the air intake damper.

A smoke shelf baffle is not difficult. It should set on the rear brick retainers and be angled upward towards the front pointed toward the lower bend in top. Make a template with cardboard. You can cut it down or add to it with tape easily until you get the correct size. The larger the chimney the larger the space needs to be to allow more heat up. So an insulated flue straight up with no bends needs the least amount of heat and can be adjusted to the minimum space, even larger toward the front. Just measure the slot the Smoke travels through for the square inch area needed.

The main thing is making the square inch area the smoke travels through no smaller than the pipe and flue square inch diameter. The baffle is adjusted for the chimney, not the stove for best efficiency. So first measure the chimney flue diameter keeping the “smoke space” opening no less square inches.
I think I follow that! That will be an off season project in conjunction with new fire brick and a paint jobit really is a splendid stove and heats a sprawling ranch quite nicely! Thanks so much for your input