Fisher Stove and Chimney

wolff

Member
Sep 20, 2015
5
MD
Looking for some advice. I have a Fisher free standing stove not sure of the model. Has double doors, 5 fire bricks across the rear of the stove and 8 in out the back flue pipe. That vents into a 8x13 chimney. I had a small thermal event in the chimney and called a company out to inspect. They tell me liner is cracked and needs to be replaced. They are recommending to replace with 8in liner. I have zero problems with the way this stove has burned for the past 27 years. This is a 2 story home withe stove in the basement. Not sure if installing a new liner will work with my current set up. Or should go with a smaller liner a newer stove. Thanks in advance .
 
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bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
24,000
central pa
Looking for some advice. I have a Fisher free standing stove not sure of the model. Has double doors, 5 fire bricks across the rear of the stove and 8 in out the back flue pipe. That vents into a 8x13 chimney. I had a small thermal event in the chimney and called a company out to inspect. They tell me liner is cracked and needs to be replaced. They are recommending to replace with 8in liner. I have zero problems with the way this stove has burned for the past 27 years. This is a 2 story home withe stove in the basement. Not sure if installing a new liner will work with my current set up. Or should go with a smaller liner a newer stove. Thanks in advance .
Not sure what your question is there. I am assuming a "small thermal event" was a chimney fire. If the liner is cracked it needs replaced. Chances are after 27 years the mortar joints are shot as well. Remove the clay and replace with an insulated liner. I actually prefer 7" for old smoke dragons like yours.

As far as switching to a new stove that is up to you. There is nothing wrong with an old fisher or similar stove but new ones will out perform it in every way but absolute peak btus.
 

coaly

Fisher Moderator
Staff member
Dec 22, 2007
4,180
NE PA
Looking for some advice. I have a Fisher free standing stove not sure of the model. Has double doors, 5 fire bricks across the rear of the stove and 8 in out the back flue pipe. That vents into a 8x13 chimney. I had a small thermal event in the chimney and called a company out to inspect. They tell me liner is cracked and needs to be replaced. They are recommending to replace with 8in liner. I have zero problems with the way this stove has burned for the past 27 years. This is a 2 story home withe stove in the basement. Not sure if installing a new liner will work with my current set up. Or should go with a smaller liner a newer stove. Thanks in advance .
You're describing a Grandma Bear. Angle iron corners that become legs, or bent rounded front corners? Flat top doors with no baffle, or arched top doors with or without a baffle plate? That will identify your stove.

If you can get a 6 inch insulated liner in without the removal of the old liner, I'd try the old stove with it first. With 2 stories you probably have plenty of height to make it work. Best outcome is the stove works satisfactory for your needs without the extra labor removing old liners. (I'm betting it works better than before) Worst case scenario, you need a 6 inch stove. (probably should have done it long ago and put a Papa Bear down there) All those years with a flue twice the size as the 8 inch outlet must have wasted tons of heat up it or you cleaned it constantly. Either way you'll be happier with a 6 inch insulated flue.
As bholler mentioned, 7 inch is the best for that stove, but requires removal of old liner. I wouldn't be doing that if I could get a smaller insulated liner in. 30 years ago I didn't mind a work out, now it hurts just to watch a video of the destruction of a tile liner. If I keep getting older I may have to get one of those new stoves that use less wood.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
24,000
central pa
You're describing a Grandma Bear. Angle iron corners that become legs, or bent rounded front corners? Flat top doors with no baffle, or arched top doors with or without a baffle plate? That will identify your stove.

If you can get a 6 inch insulated liner in without the removal of the old liner, I'd try the old stove with it first. With 2 stories you probably have plenty of height to make it work. Best outcome is the stove works satisfactory for your needs without the extra labor removing old liners. (I'm betting it works better than before) Worst case scenario, you need a 6 inch stove. (probably should have done it long ago and put a Papa Bear down there) All those years with a flue twice the size as the 8 inch outlet must have wasted tons of heat up it or you cleaned it constantly. Either way you'll be happier with a 6 inch insulated flue.
As bholler mentioned, 7 inch is the best for that stove, but requires removal of old liner. I wouldn't be doing that if I could get a smaller insulated liner in. 30 years ago I didn't mind a work out, now it hurts just to watch a video of the destruction of a tile liner. If I keep getting older I may have to get one of those new stoves that use less wood.
The other issue is after 27 years I can pretty much garantee when those tiles are broken out the outside will be just as dirty as the inside and the brick chase will need cleaned before installing the liner. That is why I like to take out old liners like this
 

coaly

Fisher Moderator
Staff member
Dec 22, 2007
4,180
NE PA
The other issue is after 27 years I can pretty much garantee when those tiles are broken out the outside will be just as dirty as the inside and the brick chase will need cleaned before installing the liner. That is why I like to take out old liners like this
But if there is a block off plate top and bottom, the air getting through any cracks would be minimal preventing ignition of any creosote behind liner. You can have lots of fuel in there, but without airflow wouldn’t it be harmless? Plus with an insulated liner how can it get hot enough to ignite?

Seems to me It’s like when you run out of propane, the lines and tank run out of pressure, but there is still 100% propane vapor in the line and tank so it goes out. The flame can’t burn in the line or tank without oxygen. Same as a coal bin. Without air going through it, it’s not going to burn.

If the OP had a chimney fire, that would be the time for anything behind the liner to ignite. If it did, there’s ash there now. It’s certainly not going to get that hot again with an insulated liner. Maybe there’s a possibility I’m not aware of?
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
24,000
central pa
But if there is a block off plate top and bottom, the air getting through any cracks would be minimal preventing ignition of any creosote behind liner. You can have lots of fuel in there, but without airflow wouldn’t it be harmless? Plus with an insulated liner how can it get hot enough to ignite?

Seems to me It’s like when you run out of propane, the lines and tank run out of pressure, but there is still 100% propane vapor in the line and tank so it goes out. The flame can’t burn in the line or tank without oxygen. Same as a coal bin. Without air going through it, it’s not going to burn.

If the OP had a chimney fire, that would be the time for anything behind the liner to ignite. If it did, there’s ash there now. It’s certainly not going to get that hot again with an insulated liner. Maybe there’s a possibility I’m not aware of?
It is rare but a fire outside the clay liners can and does occasionally happen. It is also next to impossible to put out. Because of the limited oxygen supply it is usually not intense but it can still cause problems
 

wolff

Member
Sep 20, 2015
5
MD
Thank You. coaly & bholler. Yes flat top doors with out baffles. I do have a damper in the stove pipe. I am waiting for a second opinion on the damage. While they tell me it has cracks the can't show me them in the pictures.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
24,000
central pa
Thank You. coaly & bholler. Yes flat top doors with out baffles. I do have a damper in the stove pipe. I am waiting for a second opinion on the damage. While they tell me it has cracks the can't show me them in the pictures.
I would be very surprised if it wasn't cracked after that long with that stove
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
24,000
central pa
How do they remove the old tile liner in a chimney 2 stories tall
With a tile breaker. It usually takes me about an hour to an hour and a half