Garn 2000 for house and shop

Highbeam

Minister of Fire
Dec 28, 2006
17,962
Mt. Rainier Foothills, WA
Sounds like typical high iron content in your well water. It’s clear until it hits oxygen and then it oxidizes into particles that can be filtered or will settle out. You probably have orange toilet tanks too! It’s easy to remove iron so that you don’t have it in your home or your boiler. My wife hated the orange stains in the dishwasher, toilets, and even light colored clothing.
 

eauzonedan

Member
Jan 21, 2011
96
Bayfield Co. Wi
Unfortunate but not that simple .... no staining of fixtures laundry etc. or other indications. Mike says it’s definitely iron but it is bound with other things in the well water. Way back when I did the well I tested for free iron and nothing showed up. If I wanted to spend a bunch of diagnostic dollars it could be better identified. Bottom line is it prefers to bond with his cocktail better than whatever else is available and precipitates out as the flock in the tank. Knowing the full chemistry would be nice but not sure the juice would be worth the squeeze. Pia to get it out after a full drain and refill but once removed it’s fine and tank is gin clear till any top up with the well water. As long there is available chemical and the top up is minor it’s back to clear with a filter change or two. Plan B would be to truck water in but the process a lot of local municipalities use to treat water in this area would create different and even worse problems. Points out why Garn is so persistent on the water quality. Unfortunate that no two areas have the same exact issues. Dan
 
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hedge wood

Member
Mar 1, 2009
120
Eastern NE
Dan
Sounds like you well is like mind not good. In the past I hauled my water in but have since lost that source so after the the repair last year I had to use my own well. I filtered it going into the Garn and worked with Mike on the cocktail to work with what I have. When I first got back up and going I was changing my filter every two weeks. Then went to a month then two. The water is clear and test good now per Mike. I am going for three months on this change and see how the filter looks. I built my own cover out of stainless with a good seal years ago and that helps a bunch on water loss. Now that I am semi retired and can feed the Garn more times with wood I am not firing as high temp as I used to and that helps on water loss also.
 

hedge wood

Member
Mar 1, 2009
120
Eastern NE
Grigg
Did you get the Garn up and making heat? It was 70 degrees here yesterday and is heading down in the upper 30's today and 40's all week here. My Garn is doing a nice job keeping me and my domestic water wartm this A.M. Have a good Easter.
 

Grigg

Member
Jan 7, 2015
29
Lexington, VA
Thanks for asking, I've been meaning to give an update.

From earlier discussion we have 5'-8" room between name tag on Garn door and opposite wall, feels like ample working room.

Mostly enclosed in 5/8" drywall now. The top has drywall over the joist then 3/4" AdvanTech for a floor. Need to finish back side access panels.
Front is almost done, sturdy 5/8" drywall reinforced with fiberglass mesh then 1/16" Formica sheet over that. Plan is to use T-nuts in the drywall to attach to the Garn flange and attach the removable Formica covers and trim pieces to the drywall. The outside edges will get some sort of metal trim to hold the Formica and drywall down.

Covering the front has taken a LOT of time and effort to do nicely and be removable. A drawing, template, or plan/instructions from Garn on enclosing the front would have been much appreciated, everyone that buys a Garn shouldn't need to figure out this puzzle over and over again.

Week before last we got it up to 180 degrees for the first time. Initial fill was about 1" over recommended level so as expected it overflowed. It's now back down to about 100 degrees and 1/2" lower than suggested max fill level.
The insulation above the manway was quite wet from escaping moisture. When installing it I couldn't understood how a piece of Teflon sheet would seal to the not quite flat and smooth manway flange, and it doesn't. Doubtful that a 10 lb weight (recommended) would help much either, and is that 10 lb per half lid or only 5 lb each?
I ordered and installed some rubber trim part number 8693K25 from Mcmaster Carr, pictured below. I'll find out if that helps next week.

The Garn is connected and warming the new concrete floor when called for.
Connected to the upstairs coil in the air handler, waiting to finish wiring and duct work but the heat part is ready.
Modine Hot Dawg heater for the shop is here and ready to hang and finish plumbing tomorrow.
Triangle Tube Smart 60 hot water heater almost finished installing in the basement for house.

Decided on US Boiler Baseray baseboard radiators for the house, they'll be here within two weeks.
Already have the PEX lines run in the basement for them and should install the manifold tomorrow. Manifold like you would use for radiant floor with each Baseray unit on a loop, some rooms will have two units/loops. Should be easy to adjust flow and balance room temperatures higher or cooler (bedroom) than the average without complication of separate thermostats and pumps or automated valves.

Some possibly helpful tidbits:

The water level assembly I used is McMaster Carr part number 1142K31 https://www.mcmaster.com/catalog/126/604/ Also 3/4" nipple and a 1/2" to 3/4" reducing coupling
Made by LDI industries as a vented oil gauge I believe their part number G265-4 http://www.ldi-industries.com/LDI-Files/Spec-Sheets/Lubrication-Equipment/Vented-Oil-Gages/G260_Series.pdf
It's perfect height as water is right at the top of the sight window when overflowing. You could use a shorter one with some offset plumbing as working range is the upper half or so of the nominally 12" tall gauge.

Garn does not supply a grommet for the top left of control box to run the flue temperature sensor through. Try Mcmaster Carr part number 9600K521 and punch your own hole to fit thermocouple wire then slit it to the edge for installing over the wire. You could punch more holes if you had more wires emerging there. https://www.mcmaster.com/catalog/126/4029
 

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hedge wood

Member
Mar 1, 2009
120
Eastern NE
Grigg
Looks like things are coming right along. I haven't been around there new split man way cover but it only took a couple weeks of running back in 2009 before I built a new man way cover out of heavy stainless with a gasket. Haven't had any moisture leaking out of the man way area since. I did insulate the new cover with foam. I do like your sight glass for the water level. We had a fair amount of those on gear boxes on cooling tower's at work to keep a eye on the oil level. Installing one of these Garn's is a big job you will get it finished up one of these days.
 

jesweli

New Member
May 13, 2020
1
New York, NY
I know of two other Garns in our county, one I've seen and one I haven't. You're not that far away, do you have one as well?

Yes, it is sitting on Dow Thermax Polyisocyanurate Insulation which has a compressive strength of 25 psi. The boiler full of water and given the runner area only applies 8.3 psi, so although it seems counter intuitive the foam is more than adequate to support the weight.

Grigg
I too think the same.
 

SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
4,763
Downeast Maine
Sounds like typical high iron content in your well water. It’s clear until it hits oxygen and then it oxidizes into particles that can be filtered or will settle out. You probably have orange toilet tanks too! It’s easy to remove iron so that you don’t have it in your home or your boiler. My wife hated the orange stains in the dishwasher, toilets, and even light colored clothing.
How do you do it? I have a three stage filter and still some makes it through.
 

Highbeam

Minister of Fire
Dec 28, 2006
17,962
Mt. Rainier Foothills, WA
How do you do it? I have a three stage filter and still some makes it through.
Manganese oxide. Goes by several brand names including mang-ox or what I’m currently running at home, pro-ox from cleanwaterstore.com. It’s an actual media iron filter that backwashes, not a cartridge. It’s 9” diameter, 48” tall and backwashes the collected iron once per week.

At work I was the pm for the installation of a giant Manganese oxide filter using the same principle but that thing was twice the size of a cargo van and over a half million bucks!

The media has a 10 year life expectancy and is the way you remove iron and manganese from water.
 
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Grigg

Member
Jan 7, 2015
29
Lexington, VA
We haven't fired the Garn yet this season but I did send out a water sample yesterday. I expect we'll have it running week after this.
We've got the wood shed already half full of slab wood from my Dad's sawmill and getting ready to cut and split two dump truck loads of long wood. That should fill the woodshed, about 10 cords, and we'll start using it next year, time will tell how long that much last, I hope about 1.5 years use.
This year we have some dry from previous years and will borrow some from my folks. Construction schedule for the addition didn't fit well with wood cutting to get ahead like I intended.

Starting to get excited about being warm and cozy this winter.
 

hedge wood

Member
Mar 1, 2009
120
Eastern NE
Grigg I got behind this year with getting my wood ready to. Been trying to get some health issues straighten around. We finally got some hedge done before we started fall harvest. I run my Garn year around for domestic water. Temps been dipping down in the 30's and now the 20's so I been running a full load a day in the Garn the last 10 days or so. I guess winter is getting here like it or not. Still have field work, dirt work and would like to get some more wood cut before winter really gets here. Hope all is well with your Garn on start up.
 
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SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
4,763
Downeast Maine
Five years seems like a short amount of time for such an expensive boiler. I doubt it would pay for itself in that amount of time.
 

salecker

Minister of Fire
Aug 22, 2010
1,196
Northern Canada
Well I got 5 years out of my Garn before the bottom rotted out
That seems totaly out of the norm for a Garn
I would not settle for that issue.
You need to find out what is happening. I remember a few years ago there was a 25? or so year old Garn the had been in a building that burnt,The Garn was cleaned up and put back to use because it was in great shape.The fellow that posted it said he saw lots of aged Garns in prime shape.
 

Woodfarmer1

Member
Nov 10, 2013
242
Bowmanville, On,Can
Mine went into service before the filter system was recommended, lots of crud on the bottom. Water always tested good and the proper chemicals always used.
 

Grigg

Member
Jan 7, 2015
29
Lexington, VA
That is odd, 5 years is not very long.

Part of the instructions now is to check the bottom for sediment several times every year and clean if necessary. They even explain how to remove the water, (inexpensive swimming pool) clean, and refill with same water if required.
Did you check for stuff on the bottom of the tank and remove it as needed? Was that in the manual at the time?