Haughs Wood Stove

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Blazzinghot

Member
Dec 5, 2019
144
New Plymouth, Idaho
I got this stove for free and believe there is still hope for it. It is dated 11/88 and this model was tested in 87. This stove has a tag on the back which I will let you read. The secondary burner is a metal box with about 20 holes on the front. I just added about 45 more 1/8 holes which you can see in the picture where the stove is upside down. The inlet if plenty big for secondary air but not sure how the air will be distributed. The air wash system is right over the top of the word stove and draws in are from the top . The slider does not move more than a 1.2 inch so you can't shut of the air totally. The primary air comes in over the top of the glass window. I am still working on it so any suggestions are welcome.

What do you think about putting an insulated blanket on top of the inside metal box? Will it be to hot for the metal? Or will it make things worse?

The width is 19 inches the depth is 16 inches and the height is 23 1/2 inches counting the legs. It is a small stove still trying to find info on it. I could not find model S131E . Not sure how much space it will heat.

Front Close.jpg Full Back Tag.jpg Air Instake Door.jpg Secondary Air.jpg Stove Right Side.jpg Back Tag.jpg
 

coaly

Fisher Moderator
Staff member
Dec 22, 2007
4,264
NE PA
I can give you the factory specs, but that won’t do you much good after modifying the intake burner.

The holes across the front were to direct flame toward glass to keep it clean. Drilling more holes reduces the volume and velocity of the air exiting each hole, so it will no longer reach the glass as designed. You will need a stronger draft to get more air into the firebox and maintain the same flow through original holes. Drilling more holes doesn’t add more air, it slows the flow through each hole down. You still have the same amount of air entering until you increase draft. Retaining more heat in the firebox by insulating the baffle slows the incoming air even more.
 
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Blazzinghot

Member
Dec 5, 2019
144
New Plymouth, Idaho
coaly you have made some good points. I am going to hook this stove up in my shop so I get a good draft and will see what happens. If my plan does not work then I will make some other modifications to the stove. It was free stove so I will have fun with it. But I will keep everyone posted as this has a nice glass window so I can see what is happening inside the stove.

I am almost done wire brushing and sanding and using rust remover on this stove. I am waiting for the glass window to arrive and when it is done I will post the results. Then will be able to test it when the weather cools down.
 

Blazzinghot

Member
Dec 5, 2019
144
New Plymouth, Idaho
Finally got the glass. This stove was hard to clean and is a little pitted but it turned out great. I hooked it up to my shop today and will test it tonight or in the morning.
 

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Blazzinghot

Member
Dec 5, 2019
144
New Plymouth, Idaho
I have been able to build several fires in this wood stove. I have tried it with my modification and without by putting screws in the holes I drilled. It does not seem to make much difference either way. At first it did not seem like the stove was getting enough air. I found that you have to get the stove very hot before you close the door. But even then the adjustment on the stove is very minimal as the primary air above the door has only about a 3/4 inch adjustment. I tried different kinds of firewood and was able to get the stove up to 470 degrees. The only way to over fire this stove is to leave the door cracked open. My flue was about 13 ft. long. In short not the best design for its time but will be a good stove for someone's work shop.
 

coaly

Fisher Moderator
Staff member
Dec 22, 2007
4,264
NE PA
You don’t have enough temperature differential between the inside and outside of chimney to make it perform correctly. You won’t get enough air through the intake until temps are below 40, and performance will increase as it gets colder than that.
 

Blazzinghot

Member
Dec 5, 2019
144
New Plymouth, Idaho
coaly I thought about the air temp but I don't understand the science behind it. For example lets say I have this stove hooked up in my shop when the temp is 30 out. Then when my shop warms up to 65 then the outside air being brought into the stove is now 65 what happens to the air differential? And only one short section of the flue will be exposed to the cold which is double wall insulated pipe so have a hard time seeing how the temp would make much difference once the insulated pipe is warmed up. I am sure this is silly question but I have to ask to learn.

There is another factor I hooked up my homemade tank stove with a brick liner inside with a secondary burner with a glass window with an air wash system and it draws in air just fine under the same conditions. I can get this baby really cranking with the primary air controls.
 

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
1,494
Eastern Long Island NY
it's a gas density issue. Warm air goes up. The air in your chimney will be warm - either because you are/start burning, or because it's air leaking out of your home/shop. That goes up like a hot air balloon at the top of your chimney, sucking more air in to it through your stove.

The colder it is outside, the higher the temp differential will be, and the faster the draft.

A reverse draft is the heavy cold air sinking down into/displacing the lighter warmer air in your shop. THat's why forcing warm air (hair dryer) up the chimney works; once it's there it goes up, and in doing so sucking air into your stove to replace what's going up.
 

Blazzinghot

Member
Dec 5, 2019
144
New Plymouth, Idaho
stoveliker when you speak of gas density you must be referring to the air inside of the stove as it burns. I tried to find information on air density and wood stoves and could not fine much. I am still trying to solve my question I asked earlier. Maybe someone could point me to a study on this topic. Thanks, I remember some years back I read a study on how a candle burns it was very amazing. The chemical reactions that take place in a simple flame is very complex.
 

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
1,494
Eastern Long Island NY