Hearthstone Heritage Toxic smells, rust and a crack - Not Happy

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matyw

New Member
Apr 11, 2022
3
goodthru06/14
Hello All!
I bought 2 new epa hearthstone heritage stoves.
The break-in process is quite vague in the manual. I followed it as best as I can.
About 12 fires later, I still need to open all windows and close the doors for the living room.
We are quite sensitive to environmental toxins. It is awful.
I am not happy, and worst is that I have zero way to contact the manufacturer to understand what is going on.
The stove arrived with rust in many areas
A crack developed on fire 2 or 3.
I haven't run the second stove yet.
How long is the stove going to produce toxic smells for?
I haven't heard anyone comment on this in my search.
We are extremely disappointed with hearthstone.
Is there any manufacturing defect that would cause ongoing toxic gas from entering our home?
I have run a few longer fires hot enough to run the catalyst but the smell continues at the same intensity it seems.
Any insights would be greatly appreciated.
Thank you
Matt
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
96,219
South Puget Sound, WA
The odor may be the paint baking in. What is the hottest temp the stove has reached? The crack is a warranty-covered defect and the dealer should repair. Get it on record right away to avoid shipping costs for the new pieces. (90days)
 

webby3650

Master of Fire
Sep 2, 2008
11,133
Indiana
This is the reason I’ll never have another Hearthstone. I rarely ever see one that’s not cracked…
 

webby3650

Master of Fire
Sep 2, 2008
11,133
Indiana
I think the stone is just too vulnerable. It makes an excellent insulator though! 😂
 
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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
96,219
South Puget Sound, WA
Wonder what is up with the cracking?
I read somewhere a few years ago that quality, flawless soapstone supplies are diminishing. Most are already reserved and spoken for.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
96,219
South Puget Sound, WA
Yes, if the hairline cracks were on the interior soapstone of a GM stove that would be less of an issue.
 

matyw

New Member
Apr 11, 2022
3
goodthru06/14
The crack is barely visible when the stove is cold then it opens up when hot. I suppose its a job replace it and apply new sealing cement and then the stone doesn't match the rest of the stove.
Is it a risk of cracking the top if i place a kettle of cold water on it? The dealer said it could be cooked on but i wanted a second opinion.
Many thanks to you all for your responses!
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
96,219
South Puget Sound, WA
If the crack opens up enough to leak air into the firebox it must be replaced. It will change the burning characteristic of the stove and void the EPA testing.

The kettle may be ok, but if the kettle spills or cold water is spilled on the hot top there is a risk of thermal shock.
 

ridemgis

Feeling the Heat
Hearthstone's need a gentle break in fire or two every fall to drive out moisture that seeps into the stone over a humid summer. I failed to do this one year and developed a hairline crack in the back of the stove. I patched it from the inside with Hearthstone's own brand of stove cement (link below) and haven't had a problem since. That was eight years ago. (https://www.woodmanspartsplus.com/W.../Product/HearthstoneFurnaceCementforSoapstone)
 
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Dakotas Dad

Minister of Fire
Mar 19, 2009
1,510
Central Kentucky
We do about 4 "break in" fires every fall. Take it to 200F on the top, let it cool completely, do the same the next day. Then a day later, 300F, then, again a day later 350-400F. My neighbor does the same with his Hearthstone. Neither of us has cracked a stone yet, more than 10 winters in..

On the "smells".. each time you reach a new high temperature, you are going to further "cure" the paint/enamel/sealants. And you will get some odors from that. Also, you will find in subsequent seasons, first hot fire will give off some hidden dust, animal dander etc, burning off.
 

Highbeam

Minister of Fire
Dec 28, 2006
19,986
Mt. Rainier Foothills, WA
Some people are just crazy sensitive to any smell other than no smell. Woodburning usually makes some sort of smell whether that's burning dust, a whiff of smoke, or break in fumes.
 

Hoytman

Minister of Fire
Jan 6, 2020
512
Ohio
I personally think with anything natural like soapstone or clay that gradual heating to drive out moisture is a good idea.

I’ll take it a step further…

I never have agreed with many manufacturers suggestions of people starting quick hot fires in any stove with a masonry chimney or a stone or cast iron stove. Why?

For the same as mentioned above…a natural substance. Cast iron can take a lot of heat as well IF heated and cooled gradually.

If you drive out any moisture and then from them on heat it gradually there is zero thermal shock to the masonry chimney liner and/or stone/cast iron stoves.

In my view, the only reasons why manufacturers suggest quick hot fires is to satisfy EPA Regulations for less air pollution.

I don’t want dirty air to breathe, but the last time I checked the government isn’t giving any refund checks for stoves damaged by manufacturers suggestions to start quick and hot fires when starting your stove…regardless how many times you start it.

The question them becomes: How do we define “gradually” heating your stove or chimney?

I also have my own opinion formed about that, but I’ll leave it up to each individual to decide what to do. I’ll simply say…I know exactly how I would do things.
 

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
6,165
Long Island NY
Cast iron does not contain moisture like clay or stone.
It does - as any system - like gradual heating better because it limits the differences in thermal expansion which can lead to cracks.
 

Hoytman

Minister of Fire
Jan 6, 2020
512
Ohio
I never wrote that cast iron has moisture in it. Cast iron was mentioned in addition to talking about natural clay and stone and I mentioned it on reference to “quick hot fires”, not moisture. I even separated my comments by saying I’d take it a bit further.

I first mentioned moisture then went on to talk about heating a stove too fast which can also cause cracked stone, except I said it a little different. Cast iron was then mentioned in the same manner (like stone/clay)…heating it too fast can crack it, just as cooling it too fast can also crack it. Key thought being “gradual”.

The point of my comments was whether a stove be made of natural elements or cast iron, heat and cool either slowly. The way I wrote it wasn’t perfect, but I never said nor did I intend to imply that cast iron had moisture in it.
 
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stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
6,165
Long Island NY
I guess my reading is imperfect too.