Heat temp for stove box

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Jamison

Member
Jan 1, 2011
87
Outside of Philly
Hi Everyone,
Have a Lennox Canyon ST310 ( a big stove!) Chimney sweep said my baffles were cracked probably because the firebox getting too hot. Replaced the baffles now I'm worried about the heat temp.

I have a thermometer inserted into the pipe and NEVER let it go over 800 F. Chimney Sweep said I should also have thermometer on top of firebox. Seems like over kill to me. Suggestions? Should I have a 2nd thermometer? If so, what temp? Thanks in advance!
 

Ctwoodtick

Minister of Fire
Jun 5, 2015
1,578
Southeast CT
Hi Everyone,
Have a Lennox Canyon ST310 ( a big stove!) Chimney sweep said my baffles were cracked probably because the firebox getting too hot. Replaced the baffles now I'm worried about the heat temp.

I have a thermometer inserted into the pipe and NEVER let it go over 800 F. Chimney Sweep said I should also have thermometer on top of firebox. Seems like over kill to me. Suggestions? Should I have a 2nd thermometer? If so, what temp? Thanks in advance!
With a steel stove, I’d try to keep temps under 750 ish or so. Getting towards 800 puts you on the road towards overfiring. You could use a magnetic thermometer or use an infrared thermometer.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
90,606
South Puget Sound, WA
I'm a bit confused, the Canyon used to have a firebrick baffle system. Did they change it to a baffle board? What year is this stove?

With a steel stove, I’d try to keep temps under 750 ish or so. Getting towards 800 puts you on the road towards overfiring. You could use a magnetic thermometer or use an infrared thermometer.
That's a good guideline for stovetop temps.

800F peak temp is ok for the flue temp on start up. It should settle down to around 5-600º when the air has been closed down.
 

Jamison

Member
Jan 1, 2011
87
Outside of Philly
I'm a bit confused, the Canyon used to have a firebrick baffle system. Did they change it to a baffle board? What year is this stove?


That's a good guideline for stovetop temps.

800F peak temp is ok for the flue temp on start up. It should settle down to around 5-600º when the air has been closed down.
Hi begreen,
I bought the Canyon ST310 new about 11-12 years ago. Had the ceramic baffles then. If they are cracking from heat, how hot should I let the box get? I ONLY have a probe inserted in the pipe ( about 18 " above the box). So should I also have a magnetic one on the firebox, and to what temp? thanks much
 

Jamison

Member
Jan 1, 2011
87
Outside of Philly
With a steel stove, I’d try to keep temps under 750 ish or so. Getting towards 800 puts you on the road towards overfiring. You could use a magnetic thermometer or use an infrared thermometer.
Hi CTwoodtick, thanks for the reply. The temp I stated is for the probe thermometer in the pipe...should I also have a magnetic one on the firebox? If so, what temp there?
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
90,606
South Puget Sound, WA
Hi begreen,
I bought the Canyon ST310 new about 11-12 years ago. Had the ceramic baffles then. If they are cracking from heat, how hot should I let the box get? I ONLY have a probe inserted in the pipe ( about 18 " above the box). So should I also have a magnetic one on the firebox, and to what temp? thanks much
I haven't looked inside one for a long time, so I thought they always had this arrangement, but with some research I found that the 2009 manual shows firebrick, but the 2018 manual shows 4 baffle boards per unit. This may have been a change when IronStrike took over the brand in 2013.

Does the paint on the stove top show pronounced greying? If not, I suspect a baffle board was cracked by the other means. They can get cracked by hitting them with logs when loading and/or during sweeping if hit by the end of the brush. You could put a magnetic thermometer on the stove top, Condar makes stove top versions of their thermometers. Some people put it on the sloped face of the step top. Still, they way you are burning sounds good if peak flue temps are 800 or below. What temp does the flue thermometer show when the stove is cruising with the air turned down during the secondary burn?

Screen Shot 2021-09-29 at 8.37.00 AM.png
 

Jamison

Member
Jan 1, 2011
87
Outside of Philly
I haven't looked inside one for a long time, so I thought they always had this arrangement, but with some research I found that the 2009 manual shows firebrick, but the 2018 manual shows 4 baffle boards per unit. This may have been a change when IronStrike took over the brand in 2013.

Does the paint on the stove top show pronounced greying? If not, I suspect a baffle board was cracked by the other means. They can get cracked by hitting them with logs when loading and/or during sweeping if hit by the end of the brush. You could put a magnetic thermometer on the stove top, Condar makes stove top versions of their thermometers. Some people put it on the sloped face of the step top. Still, they way you are burning sounds good if peak flue temps are 800 or below. What temp does the flue thermometer show when the stove is cruising with the air turned down during the secondary burn?

View attachment 282463
After the peak temp of 800 ish, I usually get down to the 400-500 F range, I think you might be right Begreen--the baffles might have been broken from hitting them with splits. I pack the stove pretty tight to get long burns. I thought the chimney sweep might be wrong about the box being too hot and the baffles cracking from heat. One thing I did note, the original baffles that came with the Canyon were pretty sturdy; I replaced them about 6 years ago and the new ones seem thinner and not the same quality ( I'm sure they were made in China!) I got these https://bit.ly/3AVNNTp which match OEM specs, but they just seem less sturdy. If you think my temps are spot on, I'll just write off the cracked baffles to poor workmanship and/or my hitting them with splits. Thanks much for the reply and help! Stay warm, and stay safe!
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
90,606
South Puget Sound, WA
The flue temps are normal. Enjoy that big boy. It's a heating beast.
 

Ctwoodtick

Minister of Fire
Jun 5, 2015
1,578
Southeast CT
Hi CTwoodtick, thanks for the reply. The temp I stated is for the probe thermometer in the pipe...should I also have a magnetic one on the firebox? If so, what temp there?
Right, the numbers I gave above were, in fact, for stovetop temp measurement. It doesn’t hurt to measure both the stovetop as well as your probe thermometer. For stovetop, I like the infrared ones you can pick up pretty cheaply at big box stores. Just point the laser at the surface you want and you have an instant reading. Magnetic ones are ok, but I like the infrared myself.
 

Jamison

Member
Jan 1, 2011
87
Outside of Philly
Right, the numbers I gave above were, in fact, for stovetop temp measurement. It doesn’t hurt to measure both the stovetop as well as your probe thermometer. For stovetop, I like the infrared ones you can pick up pretty cheaply at big box stores. Just point the laser at the surface you want and you have an instant reading. Magnetic ones are ok, but I like the infrared myself.
Hi Ctwoodtick, I like the idea of the infared thermometer, I'll see if i can pick one up today. Thanks for the great insights...much appreciated!
 

Highbeam

Minister of Fire
Dec 28, 2006
19,324
Mt. Rainier Foothills, WA
If you keep flue temps under 800 then you have not even come close to overfiring that stove. The normal flue temp range is 400-900. It’s pretty hard to have stove surface temps exceeding the internal flue temps. They often track together fairly well.

The baffles are just fragile and known to be easily damaged by loading fuel, handling to remove them for cleaning, or even brushing from above when the sweep left them in place.
 

Jamison

Member
Jan 1, 2011
87
Outside of Philly
If you keep flue temps under 800 then you have not even come close to overfiring that stove. The normal flue temp range is 400-900. It’s pretty hard to have stove surface temps exceeding the internal flue temps. They often track together fairly well.

The baffles are just fragile and known to be easily damaged by loading fuel, handling to remove them for cleaning, or even brushing from above when the sweep left them in place.
Hi Highbeam, very much appreciate the response. IJ think you are right, the bafffles are not as thick or sturdy as the originals from 15 years ago..they seem thinner and not as robust. I'll be very gentle when cleaning and rearranging them. And aybe NOT have that glass of wine before I clean them ;) Thanks again for your advice.