Heating efficiently

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Zoso2385

Member
Nov 4, 2018
82
Southeastern, Ct
Happy Thanksgiving All, I got a efficiency question. My setup is a Jotul Oslo V2. Interior SS liner chimney, about 27-30’ high. Through some experimentation on some cold days I’ve found if I start a fire and and get my stove up to around 550-600 degrees and let it burn until it cools off to around 400 degrees and then just throw 1 or 2 small/medium splits on, leaving the air control where it is (90% closed), generally the temp will rise back up to around 500-550. It seems like I can keep the stove nice and hot all day long with this cycle versus lighting a fire and letting it burn down to coals and then starting the cycle over again.

I’ve read that it is more efficient to run the stove in cycles instead of just adding splits on throughout the day. What are your thoughts? I’m heating 1900 sq ft 2 story cape and I’ve found on cold days <30 degrees I have a hard time keeping the whole house in the 70’s by running the stove in long cycles. The upstairs rooms aren’t cold but it does take all day to get them back up to 70 after they cool off at night
 

PaulBunyun

Member
Oct 15, 2019
44
Michigan
Similar situation to yourself. I have found that getting it up nice and hot (600+) and keeping it there until the Temps in my house are where I want them. Then just keeping it warm (400) to maintain that by putting in a couple pieces at a time work best and maintain the temp. It seems just getting the house to temp and heating all that space is the big thing. Then having a consistent heat (although not as hot) to replace lost heat works best. Just my 2 cents. I am also heating a 2story, 2k+ sqft, cape cod as well.
 

firefighterjake

Minister of Fire
Jul 22, 2008
19,450
Unity/Bangor, Maine
My own take . . . if it works for you then go with it even though it may mean a less efficient burn. I know in my own two story Cape burning in cycles works best, but I also have a newer home (1976) and I have spent quite a bit of time adding extra insulation and caulking over the past few decades since buying the home. That said . . . when the temps turn really cold I will reload sooner rather than later to keep the heat levels up.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
90,531
South Puget Sound, WA
Happy Thanksgiving All, I got a efficiency question. My setup is a Jotul Oslo V2. Interior SS liner chimney, about 27-30’ high. Through some experimentation on some cold days I’ve found if I start a fire and and get my stove up to around 550-600 degrees and let it burn until it cools off to around 400 degrees and then just throw 1 or 2 small/medium splits on, leaving the air control where it is (90% closed), generally the temp will rise back up to around 500-550. It seems like I can keep the stove nice and hot all day long with this cycle versus lighting a fire and letting it burn down to coals and then starting the cycle over again.

I’ve read that it is more efficient to run the stove in cycles instead of just adding splits on throughout the day. What are your thoughts? I’m heating 1900 sq ft 2 story cape and I’ve found on cold days <30 degrees I have a hard time keeping the whole house in the 70’s by running the stove in long cycles. The upstairs rooms aren’t cold but it does take all day to get them back up to 70 after they cool off at night
That's the way my wife likes to run the stove and it's also the way that many stoves in Europe are run. If it works, and there's someone around to put a few sticks on the fire then it can be ok. You can mix methods and do a batch around 9pm for an overnight burn.
 
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peakbagger

Minister of Fire
Jul 11, 2008
6,597
Northern NH
IMO, if you have hot coal bed and dry wood, its pretty efficient burn. Cool it down too much by dumping in a huge load of wood and its going to take a dip in combustion efficiency.
 

EatenByLimestone

Minister of Fire
Its that dump of cold air that harms the efficiency. If the convenience overrules all else go with it. You may be able to keep the actual efficacy up by keeping the fireplace mostly full of ashes, keeping the firebox small and quick to heat up.
 
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Zoso2385

Member
Nov 4, 2018
82
Southeastern, Ct
Great responses, thank you, I think I am gonna try running it by adding a log or two every few hours to keep the fire box temps up on the next cold week and see how it performs and then load it up for night for the long burn
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
90,531
South Puget Sound, WA
Great responses, thank you, I think I am gonna try running it by adding a log or two every few hours to keep the fire box temps up on the next cold week and see how it performs and then load it up for night for the long burn
Try to add enough wood to keep the firebox hot enough for secondary combustion. In our stove that typically is at least 3 splits.