help framing wall thimble

Bikerguyforlife Posted By Bikerguyforlife, Jul 20, 2018 at 3:42 PM

  1. Bikerguyforlife

    Bikerguyforlife
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    Jul 13, 2018
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    So i bought 2 of the selkirk 6"wall thimbles..it says to frame a hole 12x1/8 x 12x1/8...is this necc? Whats the best way to approach this? Also someone mentioned 2" gap somewhere??? These are class a selkirk thimbles part # 206463 im new to this and need some help...i marked out 18" from corner wall and ceiling...and found my right side stud to start install....havent done any sheetrock cutting yet
     
  2. bholler

    bholler
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    You need to follow the instructions and frame in a 12.125x12.125 hole. You also need to make sure you have proper clearances for the stove which from your last post i am pretty sure you dont.
     
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  3. coaly

    coaly
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    The wall thimble is for 6 inch insulated chimney pipe (Class A Chimney) to go through.

    There is a 2 inch clearance for Class A Chimney to a combustible material.

    The thimble prevents the chimney section from getting closer than 2 inches to a combustible material such as wall studs or blocking.

    It is ONLY for using Selkerk chimney, you can't mix and match chimney parts with other manufacturers. Each part has its own instructions to follow exactly.

    Your single wall connector pipe can connect to the chimney pipe, but only chimney pipe goes through the wall thimble and all the way up to the required height.

    Depending on the Resolute model, you may need 18 inches clearance to wall WITH approved heat shield. That stove was made in a I, II, III and Acclaim model. They require different clearances and the rear vent model cannot be used in a corner installation. So it depends on your stove if you can even use it. (Also depending on it having a UL tag on the back)
     
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  4. begreen

    begreen
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    We need the model of the stove in order to determine the clearances. That's why folks are asking if there is a UL label on the back of the stove. If there is none then the clearances are 36" in all directions, but that can be reduced with a proper NFPA211 wall shield. My guess is that the current install with the corrugated metal behind the stove does not qualify. However, it could qualify with some minor modifications.

    First though it would help to figure out what model Resolute you have. This also will be helpful if you need parts. Can you post some pictures of the stove?
     
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  5. coaly

    coaly
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    If there is no UL tag, the stove cannot be legally installed. He is under the 2012 ICC Mechanical Code requiring all appliances to be listed.

    https://www.iccsafe.org/about-icc/government-relations/map/tennessee/
     
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  6. begreen

    begreen
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    Sounds like half the state's installations may not be code then. There are a lot of pre-UL labeled stove installations in TN. Wondering if there are exceptions permitted when installed per NFPA 211 if approved by the local inspecting authority? I would ask the inspector.

    Erin city code states the following:
    12-1002. Modifications. Definitions. Wherever within the mechanical code reference is made to the duties of a certain official named therein, that designated official of City of Erin, Houston County, Tennessee who has duties corresponding to those of the named official in said code shall be deemed to be the responsible official insofar as enforcing the provisions of said code are concerned. (Ord. #517, § 2, Sept. 2000)
     
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  7. Bikerguyforlife

    Bikerguyforlife
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    Jul 13, 2018
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    Before we get to far guys...i cut the hole....the hole in center of finished black cover is 8" so obviously this is double wall pipe...this stuff is expensive!! Can i just use double wall going thru the wall?... if not im probably going to have to back out...we simply dont have the money...my ul tag...i will post a picture..you guys are awsome man! Thank you...
     
  8. Bikerguyforlife

    Bikerguyforlife
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    Also whats my next step to position stove? To line the pipes up to thimble?
     
  9. bholler

    bholler
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    You need to use the same chimney pipe from the point you go through the wall to the top of the chimney
     
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  10. Bikerguyforlife

    Bikerguyforlife
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    I cant run an adapter from thimble to single wall? Im not going thru eve im going outside of it...so distance from vinyl will be substantial
     
  11. bholler

    bholler
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    No you cant.
     
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  12. begreen

    begreen
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    No. On the outside of the thimble there should be a class A (chimney pipe) tee. From the snout of the tee a short piece of chimney pipe (12 or 18") goes through the wall. This is essential for safety.

    This is really important. Chimney pipe is expensive, but it is essential for safe operation. You have your family to think of here. This has nothing to do with some big company trying to empty your wallet. You are putting in infrastructure that must be done safely.
     
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  13. Bikerguyforlife

    Bikerguyforlife
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    I AGREE double wall should go thru the home.....but to run the full length all the way to my roof i just cant afford....i will be aprox 18 inches from the house with the pipe because im avoiding eve......so is there an adapter to run single wall up the side of house?
     
  14. begreen

    begreen
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    No, only chimney pipe should be used outside the house. There is no adapter to single wall for this.
     
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  15. coaly

    coaly
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    Here is the reason for chimney pipe; A wood stove will not work properly with single wall pipe. Single wall pipe cools very fast.

    When you understand this, you will understand what makes a wood stove work;

    The temperature of rising gasses inside a chimney flue must remain above 250* f. to the top. Just like in an internal combustion engine, atmospheric air pressure PUSHES air into your stove. (In an engine, the piston goes down, creating a void (vacuum) for atmospheric air pressure to PUSH into - without that, the engine will not run) This vacuum in your stove is caused by the lighter exhaust gasses inside flue, than cold dense outside air, RISING in the chimney. So the CHIMNEY is the ENGINE that drives the stove. The differential temperature between inside and outside of flue is what causes air to enter the stove to make it burn. (This low pressure area is measured as DRAFT, like vacuum on an engine to get fuel into it) So single wall pipe that cools very quickly doesn't allow the rising gasses to stay hot enough for proper combustion. (not enough air gets into stove) Like an engine, it loads up with carbon and soot and creates creosote as well.

    Here's the safety factor;
    Below that 250* critical temp, water vapor from combustion of fuel condenses on the flue walls allowing smoke particles to stick. This is called creosote which is a very flammable substance. This is the reason for high heat rated chimney pipe. It is designed to stay cool during a chimney fire. Single wall pipe will load up with creosote requiring cleaning constantly being a fire hazard. Enough to melt the pipe in a fire. That is why chimneys were made of masonry. Metal chimneys are insulated to stay even hotter inside with less waste to keep the chimney flue hot. The better the insulated chimney, the less fuel you use. You would have to leave so much heat out of a stove with single wall pipe that the stove won't have enough radiant heat left to heat the building. The hotter a chimney stays inside, the more efficient the stove becomes using less fuel.

    Each manufacturer has their parts tested as an assembly (for UL testing) and won't connect to other brands pipes. That is the "Through the Wall" Kit I told you about. It is a kit containing everything you need to go through the wall, then you buy as many chimney sections as you need to get above roof.
    Yes, the Chimney cost is far more than the stove.

    Connector pipe (single wall) is only for connecting the stove to a chimney. Always has been, back to the antique stoves 100 years ago.
     
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