Help planning for wood stove

bradleydavidgood777

New Member
Mar 23, 2020
34
Media, PA
I am not defensive. Just trying to get my point across to you. But you seem set on your plans so I will just make sure you do it safely from here.
I am not set on anything, I came here to get ideas on planning it out because I wanted to know other ideas. Each idea that people have shared, I commented on with more questions or reasons why I didn't want to do that option, for example, cut thru floors, and then put it back out there for further comment. I think that is normal discussion. How else would you want me to do it?
 

Davesch

New Member
Jan 15, 2020
27
Raleigh
"What makes you think that I don't like what I hear? Or respect what you are saying. I don't think I said anything like that at all. Can you give an example?"

You haven't deviated any from what you originally proposed. Goodbye.;ex
 

bradleydavidgood777

New Member
Mar 23, 2020
34
Media, PA
"What makes you think that I don't like what I hear? Or respect what you are saying. I don't think I said anything like that at all. Can you give an example?"

You haven't deviated any from what you originally proposed. Goodbye.;ex
When other ideas have been offered, I stated why that would not work for me and why it would not work for me. If you have any examples of which ones I should be considering again, please give your reasoning. But you are just acting like a hurt child at this point instead of an adult. Are you a child?
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
21,406
central pa
I am not set on anything, I came here to get ideas on planning it out because I wanted to know other ideas. Each idea that people have shared, I commented on with more questions or reasons why I didn't want to do that option, for example, cut thru floors, and then put it back out there for further comment. I think that is normal discussion. How else would you want me to do it?
Consider a larger stove. Consider going through the wall upstairs so you don't have to cut floors. Insulate the basement walls. Like I said if you are set on this stove in the basement that is up to you I won't try to convince you against it anymore. I will just make sure you do it safely.
 

bradleydavidgood777

New Member
Mar 23, 2020
34
Media, PA
Consider a larger stove. Consider going through the wall upstairs so you don't have to cut floors. Insulate the basement walls. Like I said if you are set on this stove in the basement that is up to you I won't try to convince you against it anymore. I will just make sure you do it safely.
I have considered a larger stove. I want this size stove because I don't want a heavy big stove that uses more firewood and I don't want to heat the whole house. I just want some supplemental heat from free wood. I completely understand that I can't heat my whole house and that is actually what I want and prefer. Smaller stove, less heat, less wood used, some natural gas used. Easy to transport to a new house and do the same thing.

How would I go upstairs without cutting floors?

The basement walls are 12-16" stone and concrete. I am fine with that amount and I don't want to insulate them or do all that work. I am fine with heat loss because of this. Totally get it. And totally fine with it.

As long as I get some extra heat and learn something about wood stove installation, I'm all good. And I don't want to do much that I can't take with me to another house. Like insulation of the basement.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
21,406
central pa
I have considered a larger stove. I want this size stove because I don't want a heavy big stove that uses more firewood and I don't want to heat the whole house. I just want some supplemental heat from free wood. I completely understand that I can't heat my whole house and that is actually what I want and prefer. Smaller stove, less heat, less wood used, some natural gas used. Easy to transport to a new house and do the same thing.

How would I go upstairs without cutting floors?

The basement walls are 12-16" stone and concrete. I am fine with that amount and I don't want to insulate them or do all that work. I am fine with heat loss because of this. Totally get it. And totally fine with it.

As long as I get some extra heat and learn something about wood stove installation, I'm all good. And I don't want to do much that I can't take with me to another house. Like insulation of the basement.
Ok fine. I will gladly help you figure out the install. But you need to be looking at the correct chimney pipe it costs close 3x what you posted.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
21,406
central pa
Thank you!

What is the correct pipe?

How would I go upstairs without cutting floors? Thru the stairwells?
I told you already and even provided a link to an example of the correct pipe. You want pipe that is tested to ul103 ht. To go upstairs with the stove and not cut floors you would go out the wall with the chimney.
 

byQ

Minister of Fire
May 12, 2013
525
Idaho
From what I understand - the house is small, 2 stories with a basement. The basement has 12" masonry material and the 2 stories have 6" of brick - there is no insulation. It must be an older house. How have you been heating it in the past?

I think what others were trying to get through was that masonry materials (concrete, brick, stone, etc...) readily absorb heat. So for you to get heat you must also heat everything else up, and keep heating it up because it readily sends its energy into the dirt and air.

But there are advantages to such mass. If it was me I would ridgid board all of the walls on the inside everywhere. I would do a crisscross pattern with 2 layers - say 2" horizontally and 2" vertically or 1" x 2" or 1" x 1". If you were to do this all of that masonry mass would work to your advantage. You could heat it very easily. As is, it will be a battle. It could be stuccoed and would look pretty much the way it looks now (at least in the basement).
 
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bradleydavidgood777

New Member
Mar 23, 2020
34
Media, PA
I told you already and even provided a link to an example of the correct pipe. You want pipe that is tested to ul103 ht. To go upstairs with the stove and not cut floors you would go out the wall with the chimney.
Sorry - didn't see that pipe information before. I'll check that with my codes guy when I talk to him. There are other pipes out there for less that say they are for wood stoves and are much less. Why do you specify this ul103ht?

About the chimney, I am not going to do any significant construction here since I may sell the house sometime soon. So I can't do that unfortunately.
 

bradleydavidgood777

New Member
Mar 23, 2020
34
Media, PA
From what I understand - the house is small, 2 stories with a basement. The basement has 12" masonry material and the 2 stories have 6" of brick - there is no insulation. It must be an older house. How have you been heating it in the past?

I think what others were trying to get through was that masonry materials (concrete, brick, stone, etc...) readily absorb heat. So for you to get heat you must also heat everything else up, and keep heating it up because it readily sends its energy into the dirt and air.

But there are advantages to such mass. If it was me I would ridgid board all of the walls on the inside everywhere. I would do a crisscross pattern with 2 layers - say 2" horizontally and 2" vertically or 1" x 2" or 1" x 1". If you were to do this all of that masonry mass would work to your advantage. You could heat it very easily. As is, it will be a battle. It could be stuccoed and would look pretty much the way it looks now (at least in the basement).
I have been heating the house with a forced air gas furnace and currently use the same method.

Yes, I understand about the masonry and am not concerned. Any heat I get is a bonus and my wood is free and I enjoy cutting and splitting wood. So I'm fine with all of that.

I'm not going to do significant construction, like ridgid board, because I may move out soon. I am fine with some energy loss. I have been fine with the energy loss for 20 years with the basement situation and the gas furnace. It's not that bad at all. It stays really warm down there.

I'm not really looking for ideas on how to insulate or to get it to be more efficient. I am fine with it being less efficient than the ideal situation. I am looking to install a basic wood stove to somewhat supplement my heat with free wood and to pass codes minimally and be able to tear the whole thing down and take it with me when I move.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
21,406
central pa
Sorry - didn't see that pipe information before. I'll check that with my codes guy when I talk to him. There are other pipes out there for less that say they are for wood stoves and are much less. Why do you specify this ul103ht?

About the chimney, I am not going to do any significant construction here since I may sell the house sometime soon. So I can't do that unfortunately.
Those much cheaper pipes may be for wood stoves but not to run through a window and up the side of the house. I can't be sure without seeing a link but I am betting you are referring to doublewall connector pipe. That is meant to connect the stove to the chimney. And that chimney is the 103ht pipe I referenced.
 

Mech e

Feeling the Heat
Feb 26, 2019
254
NorCal
www.dtengineer.com
I have been heating the house with a forced air gas furnace and currently use the same method.

Yes, I understand about the masonry and am not concerned. Any heat I get is a bonus and my wood is free and I enjoy cutting and splitting wood. So I'm fine with all of that.

I'm not going to do significant construction, like ridgid board, because I may move out soon. I am fine with some energy loss. I have been fine with the energy loss for 20 years with the basement situation and the gas furnace. It's not that bad at all. It stays really warm down there.

I'm not really looking for ideas on how to insulate or to get it to be more efficient. I am fine with it being less efficient than the ideal situation. I am looking to install a basic wood stove to somewhat supplement my heat with free wood and to pass codes minimally and be able to tear the whole thing down and take it with me when I move.
Just so you know, the stove you are looking at is both a radiant and convection heater. This is quite a different animal from your forced air system. As a rule of thumb, the split between convection and radiant heat transfer from the stove is about 50-50. Radiant heat transfer, unlike your forced air system, does not heat the surrounding air. Radiant heat will be transferred to surrounding objects, primarily your basement walls. The walls will absorb this thermal energy and transfer to the surrounding soil via conduction. Not much will be transferred to the air in your basement.

If you really want to proceed with the install and not make any additional improvements, I would probably look at a wood stove that leans more to the convection side for heat transfer. I think it will yield somewhat better performance.
 
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bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
21,406
central pa
Just so you know, the stove you are looking at is both a radiant and convection heater. This is quite a different animal from your forced air system. As a rule of thumb, the split between convection and radiant heat transfer from the stove is about 50-50. Radiant heat transfer, unlike your forced air system, does not heat the surrounding air. Radiant heat will be transferred to surrounding objects, primarily your basement walls. The walls will absorb this thermal energy and transfer to the surrounding soil via conduction. Not much will be transferred to the air in your basement.

If you really want to proceed with the install and not make any additional improvements, I would probably look at a wood stove that leans more to the convection side for heat transfer. I think it will yield somewhat better performance.
Very good point.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
82,477
South Puget Sound, WA
Thank you!

What is the correct pipe?
This was already explained
 

bradleydavidgood777

New Member
Mar 23, 2020
34
Media, PA
Those much cheaper pipes may be for wood stoves but not to run through a window and up the side of the house. I can't be sure without seeing a link but I am betting you are referring to doublewall connector pipe. That is meant to connect the stove to the chimney. And that chimney is the 103ht pipe I referenced.


Lots of happy customers with stories of installing outside runs and pics too.

About the window, I plan on removing the window and building whatever I need to pass code - like laying fireplace brick or whatever...so that there is then a "wall" to go thru with the kit....or whatever is easiest and passes code
 

bradleydavidgood777

New Member
Mar 23, 2020
34
Media, PA
Just so you know, the stove you are looking at is both a radiant and convection heater. This is quite a different animal from your forced air system. As a rule of thumb, the split between convection and radiant heat transfer from the stove is about 50-50. Radiant heat transfer, unlike your forced air system, does not heat the surrounding air. Radiant heat will be transferred to surrounding objects, primarily your basement walls. The walls will absorb this thermal energy and transfer to the surrounding soil via conduction. Not much will be transferred to the air in your basement.

If you really want to proceed with the install and not make any additional improvements, I would probably look at a wood stove that leans more to the convection side for heat transfer. I think it will yield somewhat better performance.
OK thanks
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
21,406
central pa


Lots of happy customers with stories of installing outside runs and pics too.

About the window, I plan on removing the window and building whatever I need to pass code - like laying fireplace brick or whatever...so that there is then a "wall" to go thru with the kit....or whatever is easiest and passes code
Yes that is the cheapest 103 ht pipe available. It is safe but doesn't perform neàrly as well as the doublewall with twice the insulation. And the of is considerably larger. So yes while it would be safe and meet code if installed correctly I would never recomend that pipe. Especially not for an exterior chimney
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
82,477
South Puget Sound, WA
Sounds like cheap is what the OP wants. Often, the cheapest chimney pipe available is Selkirk from Menards.
 

bradleydavidgood777

New Member
Mar 23, 2020
34
Media, PA
Sounds like cheap is what the OP wants. Often, the cheapest chimney pipe available is Selkirk from Menards.
Yes well with 30 feet of pipe to buy, and the possibility of moving in the near future, I'm not looking to spend a lot for sure.

I see this one which I'm assuming is indoor only right or could that be outdoor too? https://www.menards.com/main/heating-cooling/venting/black-stove-pipe/selkirk-black-stove-pipe/dsp6p24-1/p-1444453725606-c-19451.htm

I also see this one which is almost as much as the Duravent:
https://www.menards.com/main/heating-cooling/venting/insulated-double-wall-stove-pipe/supervent-reg-6-x-36-pipe-class-a-vent/jsc6sa3/p-1444453719459-c-6894.htm
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
82,477
South Puget Sound, WA
Indoor only. That is not chimney pipe.
That is the proper chimney pipe.

If moving in the near future then this is definitely not worth the hassle. It will not improve the resale value of the house.