homeowner saw vs pro saw

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I just picked up a dolmar 6400 for felling and bucking. I've been using a dolmar 510(50cc) for the past 6 years and it's worked great for everything but I wanted a second saw to bring out to the woods . I was looking at the 6100 to help buck the trees faster but my dealer steered me to the 6400(64cc). It was a pound heavier than the 6100 but it's very well balanced for bucking where it strangely feels very light when pivoting through logs and just rips through logs fast so much faster than the 510. It makes for a more productive day in the woods when I have two saws with me.
 
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D8Chumley

Minister of Fire
Jun 25, 2013
1,875
Collegeville PA
Best advice I can give: you need more than one saw. One viable combo is a 60 cc, a 40 cc and a polesaw. The big one for felling & bucking, the smaller one for limbing, the polesaw for lengthening your arms cutting smaller stuff. Seems you'll have lots of work for all of them.
One way to beat yourself up is to use only a large heavy saw for all the cutting. Risky behavior- fatigue clouds judgement.
Pole saws are definitely nice to have. I bought the Echo PAS 225 last year, but only used it a few times. I recently bought the weed wacker attachment so I get a little more use out of it, and sold my 10 yr old Echo to my brother for $50. Win-win
 

thinkxingu

Minister of Fire
Jun 3, 2007
1,125
S.NH
First, I hope you learned a lesson about buying cheap by getting what, six months out of that Poulan?

Second, you've only got about ten more trees? Buy a new Stihl 362, use it to cut all your big wood and then either sell it for just less than you paid and buy an MS 250, which'll last you most of the rest of your life, or keep it as the last saw you'll ever buy.

"Quality is remembered long after the price is forgotten."

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mikebinthesky

Member
Aug 31, 2015
52
Clinton,Ohio
The 445 really is a nice saw.I have abused mine in every way possible and it still runs like the day i bought it----give it another look.
 

BrotherBart

Modesterator
Staff member
I have 2 40cc Husqvarnas that I have run the crap out of for 10 years and they don't seem to be getting tired yet. They are my go to saws since I am a scrawny old man and the shoulders just don't want to see my big saw anymore. Ended up with two because Lowe's had them listed for $99 online and I called and the gal on the phone got snippy when I asked if the price was a mistake. So I told her to send me two of them. Figured one would be for parts. Hasn't happened.

little 142 big oak.jpg


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Jan Pijpelink

Minister of Fire
Jan 2, 2015
1,949
South Jersey
I have 2 40cc Husqvarnas that I have run the crap out of for 10 years and they don't seem to be getting tired yet. They are my go to saws since I am a scrawny old man and the shoulders just don't want to see my big saw anymore. Ended up with two because Lowe's had them listed for $99 online and I called and the gal on the phone got snippy when I asked if the price was a mistake. So I told her to send me two of them. Figured one would be for parts. Hasn't happened.

View attachment 178655

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Nice picture of your saw. Can't wait to see your dishwasher.
 

Jon1270

Minister of Fire
Aug 25, 2012
2,048
Pittsburgh, PA
www.workbyhand.com
10 years and they don't seem to be getting tired yet.

This is neither here nor there with respect to clamshell vs. vertically split case saw construction, but among the dozens of saws I've worked on in the last few years, I can only think of one that I'd describe as having gotten tired, i.e. gradually worn out. On that saw the clutch was badly worn, the slot in the chain adjuster was so chewed up that the screwdriver would always cam out, the rings were worn down to slivers and the piston was practically a golf ball. The rest were all just broken due to one or another sort of mishap or neglect. It takes an awful lot of hours to wear out a piston, or even a set of rings.
 

woodhog73

Minister of Fire
Jan 12, 2016
780
Somewhere cold !
It takes an awful lot of hours to wear out a piston, or even a set of rings.

I agree. Unless you don't keep the air filter clean, or keep the fuel air ratio adjusted properly and/ or premix ratio correct. If run properly totally agree.

My Stihl 031 is pushing 40 years old. Was a work saw for a very active firewood cutter for many years, not by me but I know the saws history. Now is a garage queen and occasional toy in that I need to fire her up and exercise her a bit.

Everything on that saw is 40 years old including all bearings, piston, rings, cylinder, carb, all fuel lines, all rubber except for one rubber AV mount which went bad. In fact the saws never been apart. even the air filter ( although I have a few spares in the garage) is original.

Just well cared for, never run improperly ( not to be confused for never run it's cut hundreds if not thousands of cords of wood) and always maintained.

I don't even purchase Stihl saws anymore lol :)
 
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venator260

Feeling the Heat
Nov 16, 2015
364
Huntingdon County, Pa
Best advice I can give: you need more than one saw. One viable combo is a 60 cc, a 40 cc and a polesaw. The big one for felling & bucking, the smaller one for limbing, the polesaw for lengthening your arms cutting smaller stuff. Seems you'll have lots of work for all of them.
One way to beat yourself up is to use only a large heavy saw for all the cutting. Risky behavior- fatigue clouds judgement.


In thinking of my own practice, I can't see limbing taking a large enough amount of time to justify the purchase of another saw. I would like a two saw system however, but they would be two bigger saws (50cc+, pro grade). One would be in the yard to buck and have a 20 inch bar, and the other would come to the woods to cut down, and have a 24-26 inch bar. The only time I've been thankful to have a small saw was if I were trimming back or clearing out a road, and that was the only thing that I was doing at that time.

I realize I'm in a different league here than the OP. While I've never measured, I'd estimate that whatever saw(s) I have will need to process at least 12-14 cords of firewood per year and 2-3 triaxle loads of logs.
 
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