How to add a simple wall switch to gas logs?

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rodman

New Member
Dec 25, 2020
5
NJ
BLUF: I just want to add a wall switch to my recently installed gas log so that my mother won't be too scared to light it with a lighter (as it is setup now)

Earlier this year I installed a gas line to my mom's old brick fireplace and added a gas log set. I put a key turn valve on the floor outside the fireplace and it has a manual valve also inside the firebox where the black pipe comes out of the brick. It works great, but my mom never uses it as she is afraid of turning on the gas and holding a lighter in to ignite. So I now want to make it as easy for her as flipping a switch as I've seen in some hotels I've stayed in with room fireplaces. Sounds like an easy addition, but I've spent hours looking online and can't figure out what I need to buy to make this happen. It seems like all that is sold online is for people who want a friggin remote controlled fireplace? I mean come on, how lazy is that? Why would anyone want another remote to lose, and with this one missing you can't shut off the fire? But I digress...

I thought I had it figured out with a $130 Skytech LMF manual valve that I could add a solenoid to and wall switch for < $70. But it turns out the solenoid won't work with a wall switch as it is a latching type and needs more power that from a thermopile, so it only works with a $150 remote (or remote switch on the wall) and an added a receiver in the firebox, both of which need batteries. To me that just looks a lot of unnecessary money and more things to fail.

I just want a simple system without batteries and a wired wall switch (or timer) to turn the fire on and off. It sounds so simple, but I can't figure out what valve and other components to buy, so any suggestions would be appreciated.

Rodman
 

Millbilly

Feeling the Heat
Dec 13, 2015
291
02648
More info needed on what you installed.
 

rodman

New Member
Dec 25, 2020
5
NJ
Bought on Amazon: Sure Heat BRO24NG; Sure Heat Burnt River Oak Vented Gas Log Set, 24-Inch, Natural Gas
 

Millbilly

Feeling the Heat
Dec 13, 2015
291
02648
I would replace what you have with a gas logsets that has a millivolt valve and pilot safety.
 

rodman

New Member
Dec 25, 2020
5
NJ
Well, I guess that's sort of what I want to do, but without replacing the brand new $130 logset. Are there no add on valves that I can buy that come with the millivolt valve and pilot safety as part of it? I see several manual valves available like the LMF that come with the pilot safety feature, but I just can't find any that seem to have a millivolt valve instead of a manual turn valve.
 

rodman

New Member
Dec 25, 2020
5
NJ
OK, so I found the following on Amazon:

- Robertshaw 710-502 'Low Profile mV Gas Valve' for $72.
- Paired with the Hearth product Controls # 8541800526 ('Hearth Products Controls Robertshaw 203 Replacement Millivolt Pilot Assembly, 18-Inch, Natural Gas') for $50

Then adding in a wall switch and wire, an additional flex gas pipe, and something to mount the pilot assembly, this looks like it would work to me for under $150.

I could also go with a full 'kit' Hearth Products Controls Dexen 6003 Series Millivolt Valve Kit with Quick Connect (MVK-NQM), Natural Gas for about $255, but other than including the flex pipe and a metal box for the valve, I don't see any discernable difference worth the extra hundred bucks.

Any feedback/thoughts would be appreciated on how/why this wouldn't work or might not be a great idea.
 

Millbilly

Feeling the Heat
Dec 13, 2015
291
02648
Sounds like an awful lot of work and scavenging parts to save a couple hundred bucks to me. To be honest I would get rid of what you have and buy what you want. As far as gas hearth products go these are the cheapest products.
 

rodman

New Member
Dec 25, 2020
5
NJ
Sounds like an awful lot of work and scavenging parts to save a couple hundred bucks to me. To be honest I would get rid of what you have and buy what you want. As far as gas hearth products go these are the cheapest products.

Yeah, I've been out of work for a few months now and trying to keep costs down while killing some time with these little projects, so I've probably putting too much time and thought into this. But I really don't want to take out what I just bought and put in and which really looks and works great.