How to reduce ash in stove room

Ctwoodtick Posted By Ctwoodtick, Jan 10, 2017 at 5:36 PM

  1. Ctwoodtick

    Ctwoodtick
    Feeling the Heat 2.
    NULL
    

    Jun 5, 2015
    374
    159
    Loc:
    Ct
    i have tried many different ways to remove ash so that it doesn't become airborne and travel into stove room. I realize some will happen, but think this could be improved further. Current method is scoop and old sauce pan. I go as slow as I can, put the cover on sauce pan before taking it out of stove (w/ fireplace glove on). Ash in saucepan then immediately is taken outside and put into metal garbage can with tight lid and is on stone surface. Typically, stove is at 150 or so degrees when I do this. My wood is mainly 20 % on fresh split (measured when outdoor temps were warm.)Also, try as I might, I usually get a small amount of fly ash that comes out of stove when I reload. Dusting my stove room weekly, I can see that I get some ash and soot on furniture. Is this all fairly normal or does this speak to any other issues I could be having. Stove is an insert with no ash lip so I know some stuff will get sucked into blower and then blown into room. Thanks
     
  2. ED 3000

    ED 3000
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Dec 23, 2015
    715
    272
    Loc:
    Southeast PA
    Good luck, sounds like you are doing everything you can. A bit of ash seems like one of the unavoidable costs of doing business here. On the other hand, you could potentially set up some sort of dust collection system with a small hood and shop vac that you turn on when cleaning the ash. Sort of like a dust collection system in a wood shop.
     
  3. xman23

    xman23
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Oct 7, 2008
    1,498
    258
    Loc:
    Lackawaxen PA
    Sorry I can't give you any advice. But my setup stays spotless, with no ash dust anywhere. I credit it to the built in stoves ash pan. We do have a small dust pan near the side loading door. So if a bit of bark falls off we sweep it up and toss it in the stove.
     
  4. iron

    iron
    Feeling the Heat 2.
    NULL
    

    Sep 23, 2015
    468
    106
    Loc:
    north of seattle
    remote vacuum at top of chimney???
     
  5. Supersurvey

    Supersurvey
    Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 25, 2015
    76
    15
    Loc:
    New Jersey
    Be sure to turn the fan off when reloading and removing ash.
     
    webby3650 and jotulguy like this.
  6. Woody Stover

    Woody Stover
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Dec 25, 2010
    8,657
    2,432
    Loc:
    Southern IN
    When I've shoveled in the past I took precautions to minimize the amount of dust escaping. If I just scooped out a shovel full of ash and dumped it haphazardly into a bucket, I had dust flying everywhere. First thing I changed was that I tried to remove ash only when it was cold out so that draft was strong and would pull any stray ash back into the stove box. I then started using a shallow pan which was about twice as long as it was wide. To empty ashes, I held the pan lengthwise, as close to the stove as I could, directly beneath the door opening. I would then carefully scoop up a shovel full of ash and put the shovel in the left end of the pan (I'm right-handed) at a slant, with the end of the shovel touching the bottom of the pan and the handle at a 45* or so angle. I tilted the handle up to get the ash sliding off of the shovel, then drew the handle to the right, depositing the ash in the bottom of the pan and creating the least amount of dust possible. At no time did I want ash falling off the shovel as it would result in a cloud of dust that the draft of the stove might not be able to capture completely. With some practice, I got pretty good at minimizing the amount of dust that escaped. The only problem with this is that the pan is hot. My SIL has a similar pan with fold-out handles (ends up looking like a frying pan,) which is nice...you don't have to grab a hot pan. Or just some handles on the end would work OK, but require two hands.
    upload_2016-12-30_12-24-5-jpeg.191546.jpg upload_2016-12-30_12-24-52-jpeg.191549.jpg images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTHEiNyp1gi0Xkalu38_UNSBDAdj35I81g-U4m_0yVjer8ob0D8jw.jpg
    Grated ash-handling is the cheese. It just makes running a stove so much easier. All the coals stay in the stove. Run a poker through the coals at the end of a load, and voila, you have just increased fire box volume as much as you can. I need that with my small fire box. You just pull the pan at the end of a burn when the stove is low, no need to deal with a container of hot coals, right now. Maybe with a huge stove with a big belly, I wouldn't have to worry about fire box space as much. But still, the longer you let 'em build up, the longer it's gonna take to get 'em out when you finally get around to it.
    My stove also has a small hole in the ash pan housing, so it feeds a little air through the grate. This keeps the coals burnt down in most cases, unless it's super-cold out and my back is against the wall for heat.
    I'm spoiled. There's just about no way that a stove without a grated ash system is gonna make it into this house any more. >>
     
  7. Supersurvey

    Supersurvey
    Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 25, 2015
    76
    15
    Loc:
    New Jersey
    I like your tools Woody, not sure what the reception would be from my wife. I use a cookie tin held partway into the stove and the draft pulls up any dust. I'm thinking a deep frying pan with handle would work great.
     
    Woody Stover likes this.
  8. Sodbuster

    Sodbuster
    Burning Hunk 2.
    NULL
    

    Sep 22, 2012
    244
    56
    Loc:
    Michigan
    I use an outdoor popcorn popper, the kind used over a bon fire. I open the lid fill it up,(inside the stove) then take it outside and dump in my storage barrel. Works OK, but wood heat is dusty heat, no getting around that.
     
  9. webby3650

    webby3650
    Master of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Sep 2, 2008
    7,774
    1,930
    Loc:
    Indiana
    I have a stove with a grated floor and pan under it and a stove with a plug in the floor that allows ash to fall into a bucket. The plug system is far less messy! I prefer it hands down over the stupid grate system...

    I deal with ash on a daily basis in other people's homes, often very fancy places. It's possible to remove ashes from an open fireplace with absolutely no mess, so it's possible. I use a small portable 5.5 horse shop-vac with a filter and a collection bag. You can't sweep up coals, but that's ok, you don't need to. Just simply hold the suction hose above the bucket you are dumping the ashes into. Follow the shovel between the stove and bucket if needed. All the airborn dust will be collected! It's that simple. Those ashvacs they sell to the public are a total joke, almost non existent suction...
     
    Squisher likes this.
  10. BuckyBeaver524

    BuckyBeaver524
    Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 3, 2017
    122
    28
    Loc:
    South East
    There is no way on God's Green Earth that a plug system is better then a well engineered grate system. Just because your particular stove has a poorly functioning system does not mean all grate systems are 'stupid'. Your logic and choice of words says a lot.
     
    fire_man likes this.
  11. sportbikerider78

    sportbikerider78
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jun 23, 2014
    1,654
    620
    Loc:
    Syracuse, NY
    I use a bucket and a shovel. While the stove is still 100-200 degrees, air all the way open for draft, I set the bucket with its opening facing the stove at a 45 degree angle. Then I gently shovel into the bucket. The natural draft pulls most of the dust into the stove if I'm careful.

    Its not perfect. It works for me. As the primary heat source, sometimes I empty ash when the stove is quite hot.
     
  12. webby3650

    webby3650
    Master of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Sep 2, 2008
    7,774
    1,930
    Loc:
    Indiana
    Ya, I've had more stoves with grated floors than you can shake a stick at! Not to mention I have my hands on all types of stoves every single day. Lots of exposure, not simply limited to a single experience with a particular stove..
     
  13. BuckyBeaver524

    BuckyBeaver524
    Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 3, 2017
    122
    28
    Loc:
    South East
    But, have you tried all the grate systems? Maybe you should before you go calling them 'stupid'
     
  14. BuckyBeaver524

    BuckyBeaver524
    Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 3, 2017
    122
    28
    Loc:
    South East
    Perhaps you should try the Woodstock grate system. It will change your life.
     
  15. webby3650

    webby3650
    Master of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Sep 2, 2008
    7,774
    1,930
    Loc:
    Indiana
    Ohh really? What makes it different or better than all the other grated systems you've tried? Or the plug systems you've tried?
     
  16. BuckyBeaver524

    BuckyBeaver524
    Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 3, 2017
    122
    28
    Loc:
    South East
    My experience has only been with the Woodstock Gate System on the PH. But let me say it has been wonderful. Perhaps my favorite part of the stove. After a long burn, I simply open up the bypass and the air supply to establish a good draft. I then open the stove door and use a small stove hoe to move the ashes and coals across the grate a few times (maybe 8 to 10 short pull/pushes) and all that remains are the coals. JOB DONE ! Separating the coals from the ash is all automatic. Most all dust goes out of the stove with the draft. Very little dust in the house. And it takes only a minute or two. If I were to redesign the system, I would not change a thing. And because I have not tried the 'plug' system, I would never call it 'stupid'. However, I have read some quotes from fanboys who do not like it.....
     
  17. webby3650

    webby3650
    Master of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Sep 2, 2008
    7,774
    1,930
    Loc:
    Indiana
    Gotcha, kinda what I thought.
    Not to discredit your experience, but most people that choose one over the other, haven't tried both for any length of time. Also, most "fanboys" of BK only dump ashes every few weeks so they would rather shovel. In turn, have more airborne ash unless others measures are taken to curb it.
     
  18. KindredSpiritzz

    KindredSpiritzz
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Oct 31, 2013
    585
    201
    Loc:
    appleton, wi
    I have a big flat shovel i use to scoop up the hot ash, then i balance it and carefully walk it 8 ft over to the open door and out to a bucket on the patio. Of course the open door combined with wind and air flow sometimes blows the ash and/or embers off the shovel making it interesting at times, but i can usually empty the stove in 3-4 trips. I tried doing it in a bucket right next to the stove but that just billows up ash like a spewing volcano.
    By spring everything is coated in a fine layer of dust. Is what it is.
     
  19. BuckyBeaver524

    BuckyBeaver524
    Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 3, 2017
    122
    28
    Loc:
    South East
    I'm ready to move on, but must note that you have totally avoided the issue of calling all grate systems 'stupid'. My advice to you would be if you want to be regarded as a professional on the subject, you lose the fanboy attitude.
     
  20. webby3650

    webby3650
    Master of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Sep 2, 2008
    7,774
    1,930
    Loc:
    Indiana
    I don't know what your deal is? What's with the attitude? I'm allowed to express my opinion, based on my experience.
    I'm not avoiding anything at all, I already said I think the grated floor ash removal system is stupid. There, I said it again...;lol
    Would saying it was inferior be more acceptable?
     
  21. Woody Stover

    Woody Stover
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Dec 25, 2010
    8,657
    2,432
    Loc:
    Southern IN
    Agreed..."No way." The Buck 91 had a decent ash dump. Big opening with a hinged lid, and the dump was off to one side so it was easy to skim the big coals to the other side. Nevertheless, that was way more work than just running the poker through the ashes a few times. It wasn't too bad if the coals were low, but if not, you were fiddling around with the door open, trying to move coals around and get the ash/small coals down the chute. Damn near needed asbestos gloves! !!! I can't imagine how the plug system is "less messy." He ran an Oslo...maybe he was opening the front door? Maybe the ashes missed the pan, and he had to clean that out once in a while? Never happens with my Keystone. Also, I'm not sure why he is talking about a Shop-Vac...I sure ain't haulin' out a friggin' Shop-Vac!
    Some people don't seem to mind it but to me, dealing with ashes is the biggest PIA of running a stove. No way I'm going back, if I can possibly help it. You need a well-designed system (pretty sure he's never seen a Woodstock, only Jotul, Hearthstone, etc.) but the grate is the easiest, cleanest way there is, hands down. >>
     
  22. webby3650

    webby3650
    Master of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Sep 2, 2008
    7,774
    1,930
    Loc:
    Indiana
    Ya, and almost every other stove on the market.>>
     
  23. Huntindog1

    Huntindog1
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Dec 6, 2011
    1,876
    381
    Loc:
    South Central Indiana
    Use a wood stove ash bucket that has the one side that slants down to the bottom of the bucket.
    When you scoop out a ash shovel full let the shovel down to the bottom of the bucket or to the ash level
    if the bucket has ashes in the bottom. dont let the ashes fall out of the shovel till its sitting on the bottom very gently.
    Then slowly tip the shovel up and let the ashes gently slide off the shovel. It works even better when you get ashes in the bucket
    as then when you gently sit the shovel full down on the ashes and start to tip the shovel up but this time just push the shovel on
    down into the ashes and then once the ashes have settled then pull the shovel back out of the ashes.

    This works pretty good not perfect but you will get better with practice.

    The key is the shovel has to be let down gently not to spill the ashes till the shovel is sitting still on the bottom
    and if the bottom already has ashes then it works even better. Then gently tip the shovel up to let the ashes slide off the shovel not
    fall off the shovel.

    Having the wood stove ash bucket with the slanted side makes it easier to let the shovel down to the bottom with out spilling ashes on the way down. Maybe thats why it was made that way.
     
  24. Woody Stover

    Woody Stover
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Dec 25, 2010
    8,657
    2,432
    Loc:
    Southern IN
    Yes, 'inferior' would be more accurate for what you are trying to say. All ash-handling systems are 'stupid'...unless you have some new prototype BK smart-stove we haven't heard of. ;)
    However, if you were to call all grated systems 'inferior,' you would be wrong and your credibility would be called into question. :p
    Yeah, if you have to use a bucket, the "coal bucket" is the way to go. The problem with it is that the rest of the space in the bucket, above where you are dumping, gets a little ash floating in it...hard to get that to go into the stove. With a flat pan like I described above, the stove draft can immediately draw in any ash above where you are sliding 'em into the pan.
     
  25. BuckyBeaver524

    BuckyBeaver524
    Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 3, 2017
    122
    28
    Loc:
    South East
    I will let the following quote made by a fanboy of stoves with plugs speak for itself. I have removed the name of the stove/brand because this is not about brands, but about ash systems.

    The plug ash system sucks. I'll give you that. In fact, I've recently given up on using it altogether, and switched over to a metal bucket with a shovel. It's a shame ** did not give better consideration to this.

    And yet I still have not called the plug system 'stupid'.
     

Share This Page