How to reduce ash in stove room

Ctwoodtick Posted By Ctwoodtick, Jan 10, 2017 at 5:36 PM

  1. Highbeam

    Highbeam
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    I don't think so. I never read that Webby said "all" grated systems are stupid. Those words were put in his mouth. He may agree with it but I still wouldn't count that against his credibility as it is his opinion based on his experience. We all get one vote.

    We save the credibility droppers for silly, personal, attacks on people instead of actually demonstrating why your different opinion is better. Be careful @webby3650 , soon they will accuse you of looking through rose colored glasses and having a wife that doesn't put out. Really.

    I've only recently begun using the plug system on my BK. Never will use in on the NC30. The pans themselves are too small. Using the plug system on the BK is 90% less ash spillage than shoveling. Even if I have to refill the pan twice.
     
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  2. kennyp2339

    kennyp2339
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    I had a US stove 2500 that had the plug / ash pan system, I used it once and laughed, shaking the draw to level out the ash so I could push more in through the plug cause more ash spillage into the living space than ever, I resorted back to the old shovel and bucket method. When I went to buy the princess the dealer asked if I wanted one with the ash pan, I ask him what kind of system was it, he said a plug type, that's all I need to hear and kindly said no thanks.
    I do want to say this, when cleaning out the stove I got a putty knife to help push the ash back to the rear of the fire box, I then shovel it out, like Webby has also stated, I only need to clean my box out every 3 weeks or so, so ash really is the last thing on my mind.
     
  3. Sodbuster

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    That's what I like about my popcorn popper process, (and to be truthful it wasn't my idea, i stole it from a friend). Once a day I take a load of ash out, and I never have to shut down my stove. Everyone has their own preference, and what works for one guy may not work for another, depending on wood, burning style etc.
     
  4. BuckyBeaver524

    BuckyBeaver524
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    Well said.....
     
  5. jatoxico

    jatoxico
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    I use a bucket and shovel. It's the right and only way to do it.
     
  6. BuckyBeaver524

    BuckyBeaver524
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    I guess you’re right if you can’t afford one of them newfangled ‘professionals only’ ash vacs……….
     
  7. branchburner

    branchburner
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    I never had any serious concern about ash until a few months ago, when I began using -- for the first time -- a stove that is exclusively front-loading. Prior to that, I have had LOTS of experience with open fireplaces, top-loading and side-loading stoves, and stoves that are front-loading but have elongated "cigar-burn" fireboxes. Some had ash grates and ash pans, some did not. But I never knew ash as a "problem" until now.

    First, there is the ash that comes with reloading. With side and top loading, there was NEVER any ash spill; you open the door and put wood in, period. Now, every reload has at least some ash spill out just by virtue of the fact that it collects in small amounts on the inside of the front door, and drops on the ash lip when you open the door. Consider that a side or top loading stove would potentially have NO NEED for a functional front ash lip, ever!

    Secondly, there is the issue of ash removal. Most stoves have a baffle system that results in air being pulled to the front of the stove, then up and back. When you open the front door, ash naturally spills out as a result of this air flow. Opening the side door does NOT result in the same sort of spill; on the contrary, air tend to flow INWARD upon opening the side door. And a top-loading stove of course has no such baffle system. (When you stir a pile of ash, the finer particles are going to disperse laterally more than vertically... so thanks to gravity, not too much ash spilled out of my top-loading stove.)

    I find with my new stove that shuffling around the coals to get ash to fall through the grate results in ash coming out the front door, whereas it did NOT come out my side doors and top doors in any significant amount when doing the same thing. So my conclusion is that the ash pan OR ash plug system on many front-loading stoves is going to be "stupid" because it's not going to be much of an improvement over just shoveling out the stove, with some associated spill. The ash pans on my top and side-loading stoves, however, were very helpful, as they allowed ash removal with little or no ash entering the living space.

    Top-loaders beat side-loaders beat front-loaders, at least as far as ash problems go.
     
  8. BuckyBeaver524

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    I had never thought about that, but it makes a lot of sense. Sure glad I got the side loader. The only thing that ever gets on my hearth is a little bit of loose bark when loading the stove.
     
  9. webby3650

    webby3650
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    Thank you sir!

    I think it's time we all take a step back and think about why we're are here. It's to try to help folks that are struggling, or look for assistance when needed. I get no benefit at all for my input, and it's cost me lots and lots of money to have all these stoves. I enjoy it and also enjoy sharing my experience. I certainly don't like being called out by a newbie because his single experience is different than mine. or my credibility being called into question. Over and out...
     
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  10. BuckyBeaver524

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    Sometimes saying 'stupid' is a bitter pill to swallow.....especially for a 'professional'. Now lets all get back to wood burning and helping others...I know I can sure use the help. I wish a moderator would close this thread.
     
  11. webby3650

    webby3650
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    You act as if I personally attacked you. I did not. I also own a messy stove with a grated floor. Nothing personal.

    I hope it doesn't get closed so the OP can get the answers he's looking for from people with experience in this. It can still be a beneficial thread.
     
  12. BuckyBeaver524

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    My bad, I agree the thread should remain open and I will move on.
     
  13. webby3650

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    Do you typically have the blower on when you clean out the stove? As mentioned, you want to turn it off.

    When I mentioned a shop vac, I didn't mean a big garage version. They make a very small portable one, but it has the same motor as the large units. It's about the size of a 5 gallon bucket on its side. I keep one nearby and use it for lots of other debris around the house, it will fix your issues. It's just for airborn dust though, no coals!
     
  14. Highbeam

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    I'm afraid it is normal for your described setup. The stronger the lights and better your vision, the more you will notice it. The more you let the stove cool off before emptying the ashes, the less float away will occur. The less you let ash drop into the pan from your shovel, the less float away will occur.
     
  15. Squisher

    Squisher
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    The vacuum method works flawlessly when done properly. As a sweep I've got a fancy pants vacuum but at home I'd just use a shop vac. Just as Webby3650 described if you move the nozzle with the scoop properly you will not get any errant ash.
     
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  16. HisTreeNut

    HisTreeNut
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    I have an ashpan and a bucket and shovel. Tried both. Prefer bucket and shovel. The ash pan on the Buck very usable however.
    Ashes are messy...part of the program. Wifey hates the dust but I have a good cleaning system... "Hey < <insert child's name> > get the hand broom & sweep this off. Get a rag and carefully wipe the stove off, then vacuum the floor. Thank you!"
    Works pretty well for me.
    ;) :) !!! !!!:) ;)
     
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  17. webby3650

    webby3650
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    Ya, I've got a rovac too, just not practical for a typical homeowner to have at their disposal.. it's a beast though!
     
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  18. Ctwoodtick

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    Blower is off when I remove the ash. I have a power smith ash vac as well which I could use to help with the floating ash better than I am now. I originally figured I would be able to pick up some relatively "warm" ash with it directly fro the stove, but that resulted in me damaging a few filters when I picked up material that was too hot. I now use the ash vac only for clean up of ash I know is cooler. Many of the ideas on this thread sound good and I will try some of them out. Thanks all
     
  19. webby3650

    webby3650
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    Try to only catch airborne ash with the vac.
     
  20. DUMF

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    Boy, what a crew getting panties in a tear over ASH REMOVAL ! ;em Come now, it's adult time; no go-to corners online.

    My take, with or without an ash pan. Take the ashes out ( we have to every morning ) with plenty of live coals and a HOT FLUE.
    Why ? As the flue guys here say: a hot flue draws. It will draw whatever dust up into the chimney. This has no controversy....I hope.

    Now, for those without an ash vacuum, use a Shop Vac or same with a GoreTex special filter. This filter is ~ $20. but will filter out fine particles such as stove ash, wallboard mud sanding, fine wood sanding. Google or Bing for sources. Just shake it out and re-use. I have used this same filter for years for the usual Spring stoves' maintenance and cleanup.
     
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  21. DuaeGuttae

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    My in-laws gave our family an "Ash Dragon" and ash rake (different brand with a long handle) this year for Christmas. We made due for years with careful scooping, but this has reduced fly ash for us, and we are happy about it. We would not have bought it ourselves (pricey), but now that we have it, I wouldn't want to go back. It's a bit of a tight fit with its handle in our stove, but it works, and I also like leaving our metal pail outside and carrying contained ashes to it. It may be no improvement over your saucepan, but I thought I'd mention it since you seem to want a different system.

    We scrounge our wood in our suburbia, and right now we're burning through some nicely seasoned beech that's about an inch too long for our stove. It fits, and the glass isn't in contact with it, but if there is a long piece in there, I'm in more danger of spilling ash (though our insert does have a small ash lip). I think being diligent to clean that up is important, so it won't get sucked into the blowers. That's where your ash vacuum could also be quite useful.

    Our setup is not dustless, but it is less dusty than before. I think with the temperatures today the stove will be cold, and it will be time for a more thorough dusting of the surface.
     
  22. shoot-straight

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    i have a BK with the plug and prefer not to use it for several reasons. bucket and shovel work ok if i take my time. if i rush and make a mistake- it gets messy. again, thats on me.

    to each his own.
     
  23. BuckyBeaver524

    BuckyBeaver524
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    A well designed stationary grate system is a thing of beauty, efficiency, and simplicity. Not all grate systems are created equal...key to the design is the proper distribution of grate holes and their size. Also, they may work a little better in side loaders versus front loaders - but that is debatable.
     
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  24. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake
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    I like the grate system in my stove . . . just saying.
     
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  25. webby3650

    webby3650
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    Stationary, yes. The worst one I've had to date was the Hearthstone Mansfield. I liked the idea of being able to close the grate when not in use, but it prevented it from being useful. I think they do it not for convience for the user, but rather they want a second defense against the poor latch on the ashpan door. At any rate, ash wouldn't fall through the grate without being forced through.
     

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