J.a. roby ultimate stove review

brad wilton Posted By brad wilton, Dec 24, 2015 at 6:40 PM

  1. brad wilton

    brad wilton
    Feeling the Heat 2.
    NULL
    

    Oct 13, 2014
    472
    66
    Loc:
    quebec
    Hi everybody,here's my stove story.i have a 2500 sqft 1730's stone house 2 ft thick walls lived here for about 7 yrs no insulation single payne windows.bought my 460lbs of heating bliss so we woudn't have to walk around with a tuque and winter coat in the house.the stove is huge will not fit comfortably in most peoples living room 27" wide 35" high 37" deep.can fit 20"splits n/s no problem e/w also works but have harder time getting fire going strong enough to start turning down once burns fine.burn times are very good actual fire time4 to 5 hours that with a 32ft chimney someone with a regular sized one 15 to 20 should actually be able to pull of longer burns,a wee bit of draft at 32ft .throwing off heat 10 to 12hrs but my house will make a bowling hot tea tepid in about 4 mins so it can make good heat.took a while to figure out how to get max out of stove.you need to have rolling flames i mean burning then you start to turn down air 25% each time ,found if you close it all the way and then open up a 1/4"you hit the sweet spot.it also has an option on the stove to run two heating pipes up from sto to help dump heat to another room,have not used it so can't comment,but seems like a good thin to have if you need to feed heat somewhere else in the house.paid roughly $1700 canadian for it really some of the best money i ever spent. In a well insulated house you could heat it with this stove alone sure of it. the window is nice and large for a nice view of fire.well thats it thanks for listening:rolleyes:
     
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  2. Smoked

    Smoked
    Feeling the Heat 2.
    NULL
    

    Feb 19, 2015
    367
    56
    Loc:
    Roanoke VA
    Looks like the cold is about to come back to the east so enjoy the beast!
     
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  3. brad wilton

    brad wilton
    Feeling the Heat 2.
    NULL
    

    Oct 13, 2014
    472
    66
    Loc:
    quebec
    I plan on it :)
     
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  4. Pady

    Pady
    New Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Mar 13, 2017
    3
    0
    Loc:
    Kamloops

    Hi Brad, interesting about the two heating pipes. Do you have a picture of it? Does not sound like the Ultimate Woodstove I'm familiar with. Thanks
     
  5. RFarm

    RFarm
    Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Oct 24, 2013
    68
    26
    Loc:
    North Georgia Mountains
    No insulation but a ton of thermal mass in that house. I imagine that stone acts as a heat sink, not releasing much heat after the stove dies down. On the plus side it probably stays very cool in the summer. With that big wood stove you probably are just fine with it. My Sedore is comparable in size, unfortunately it does not get cold enough here to really ride it hard. But man that thing throws some heat! Hail to the big stoves!!
     
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  6. LouCammie

    LouCammie
    New Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Dec 15, 2017
    24
    3
    Loc:
    st johns , newfoundland, canada
    @brad wilton looking for lived experience with the ultimate 2015 stove jaroby...
     
  7. Ashful

    Ashful
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Mar 7, 2012
    14,248
    6,992
    Loc:
    Philadelphia
    Good review, Brad. Your house sounds a lot like mine (which was built 1770’s on top of an earlier 1738 structure), with the original windows and uninsulated stone walls. I previously tried heating this place several years, with a few large Jotul Firelights, without any success. I’ve since switched to two smaller stoves, which do a much better job of it, the primary difference being the convective design.

    What I seem to have proven out is that uninsulated masonry has a near-infinite ability to soak up and expel to the outdoors any amount of radiant heat. The Jotuls were almost entirely radiant heaters, whereas my newer stoves are steel boxes with a convection jacket surrounding five sides (well, six sides, if you count the ash drawer). Moving the heat off the stove into air and heating via convection, rather than trying to radiate it to line-of sign objects in the room, seems to be the secret to effectively heating an uninsulated stone house.

    I see the Ultimate has a convection deck on top, but how are the sides constructed? It’s likely you could heat with much less wood usage, with the right stove design, or at least that is what I have found. I have simultaneously reduced my oil usage, while cutting my wood consumption from 10+ cords per year down to less than 7 cords, by switching stove types.

    My house is much larger, but I would say the amount of space I’m heating from just one stove must be pretty darn close to your 2500 sq.ft.
     
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