Jotul Castine and mobile home setup questions

  • Active since 1995, Hearth.com is THE place on the internet for free information and advice about wood stoves, pellet stoves and other energy saving equipment.

    We strive to provide opinions, articles, discussions and history related to Hearth Products and in a more general sense, energy issues.

    We promote the EFFICIENT, RESPONSIBLE, CLEAN and SAFE use of all fuels, whether renewable or fossil.

DeepSea

New Member
Feb 10, 2020
2
Western Washington
Hello all. I am installing the Jotul Castine in an old 1979 bowed roof Homette mobile which I am rehabbing. I am ordering the stove pipe (DuraVent DVL) and chimney parts (DuraPlus) from Northline Express. From the stove collar to the roof cap this is what I think I need so far: 6" telescoping DVL stove pipe-chimney adapter-stainless chimney pipe-ceiling support-roof flashing-storm collar-chimney cap with spark guard.

First question: NorthLine says that manufactured homes can only use triple wall for the chimney. Is this true? I can't seem to find any information on this.

Second question: What should the chimney height be above the roof? The Jotul manual has me a little confused:

2.3 Chimney Height

The chimney must be at least 15 ft (4.57 m) high and 3 feet (92 cm) higher than the highest point where it passes through the roof, and at least 2 feet (61 cm) higher than the highest part of the roof or structure that is within 10 feet (3.05 m) of the chimney, measured horizontally. See figure 3.

Chimneys shorter than 15 feet (4.57 m) may not provide adequate draft. Inadequate draft can result in smoke spillage when loading the stove, or when the door is open. Poor draft can also cause back puffing (ignition of gas build-up inside the firebox) and sluggish performance. The minimum height does not, in itself, guarantee proper chimney performance.

Excessive chimney height can promote over-strong draft resulting in extreme stove temperatures and uncontollable fires. Your Jøtul dealer is an expert resource to consult regarding draft issues or other performance-related questions.


Does this mean that the stainless chimney must be 15' tall above my flat roof?

Third question: Would it be smart to go up in pipe diameter to maybe 8"? Is that even possible if I use adapters?

Just for some background info, my father was Norwegian and sold Jotuls here in the US in the 1980s, so I have a very strong attachment to Jotul stoves. Brings back good memories. I will be using the outside air intake kit, floor mount brackets and the proper rated hearth (R 2).
 

ManitobaSky

Member
Nov 20, 2013
72
Manitoba, Canada
I can’t help you with the triple wall vs double wall since Canada has different standards for class a chimney.

Minimum vertical height of your pipe, both the stove pipe and the class a chimney is 15 feet. That assumes a run with no elbows, elbows will need additional vertical feet. The pipe must be 3 feet above the roof in your case.

Stick with 6” pipe and chimney, increasing the size will cause excessive cooling of exhaust gas resulting in less draft and more deposits in the chimney.
 
  • Like
Reactions: DeepSea and bholler

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
26,878
central pa
Hello all. I am installing the Jotul Castine in an old 1979 bowed roof Homette mobile which I am rehabbing. I am ordering the stove pipe (DuraVent DVL) and chimney parts (DuraPlus) from Northline Express. From the stove collar to the roof cap this is what I think I need so far: 6" telescoping DVL stove pipe-chimney adapter-stainless chimney pipe-ceiling support-roof flashing-storm collar-chimney cap with spark guard.

First question: NorthLine says that manufactured homes can only use triple wall for the chimney. Is this true? I can't seem to find any information on this.

Second question: What should the chimney height be above the roof? The Jotul manual has me a little confused:

2.3 Chimney Height

The chimney must be at least 15 ft (4.57 m) high and 3 feet (92 cm) higher than the highest point where it passes through the roof, and at least 2 feet (61 cm) higher than the highest part of the roof or structure that is within 10 feet (3.05 m) of the chimney, measured horizontally. See figure 3.

Chimneys shorter than 15 feet (4.57 m) may not provide adequate draft. Inadequate draft can result in smoke spillage when loading the stove, or when the door is open. Poor draft can also cause back puffing (ignition of gas build-up inside the firebox) and sluggish performance. The minimum height does not, in itself, guarantee proper chimney performance.

Excessive chimney height can promote over-strong draft resulting in extreme stove temperatures and uncontollable fires. Your Jøtul dealer is an expert resource to consult regarding draft issues or other performance-related questions.


Does this mean that the stainless chimney must be 15' tall above my flat roof?

Third question: Would it be smart to go up in pipe diameter to maybe 8"? Is that even possible if I use adapters?

Just for some background info, my father was Norwegian and sold Jotuls here in the US in the 1980s, so I have a very strong attachment to Jotul stoves. Brings back good memories. I will be using the outside air intake kit, floor mount brackets and the proper rated hearth (R 2).
You can absolutely use insulated doublewall chimney in a mobile home. And it is a superior product to the triple wall. The 15' requirement is usually from the top of the stove to the top of the chimney. Sometimes it is from the stove floor to the top of the chimney. The manual should say that.

And no you absolutely should not go up to 8". That won't increase your draft.
 
  • Like
Reactions: DeepSea

DeepSea

New Member
Feb 10, 2020
2
Western Washington
Thank you both for responding. Northline's reasoning for use of the triple wall is that the outside will stay cooler, but I'm guessing that the double wall stays just as cool? Why does anyone even sell or make triple wall if it's inferior? Pricing?

Also, is there a "sweet spot" for how high the piping should be? In other words, how high is too high?
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
26,878
central pa
Thank you both for responding. Northline's reasoning for use of the triple wall is that the outside will stay cooler, but I'm guessing that the double wall stays just as cool? Why does anyone even sell or make triple wall if it's inferior? Pricing?

Also, is there a "sweet spot" for how high the piping should be? In other words, how high is too high?
They sell it because it is cheaper. It is just as safe but it has half the insulation of the doublewall stuff and relies on air cooling to do the rest. That means it doesn't keep internal temps up as well.

The sweet spot for the height is the 15' called for in the manual.
 
  • Like
Reactions: DeepSea

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
91,319
South Puget Sound, WA
My guess it that the Northline is very old school. Class A chimney pipe has improved from 1979. Go with a good quality class A double-wall pipe and be sure the total flue height is at least 15'. The Castine needs this. Hook up the outside air kit and bolt the legs down to the hearth.
 
  • Like
Reactions: DeepSea