Just picked up a Jotul 602.

kybishop Posted By kybishop, Dec 3, 2018 at 6:47 PM

  1. kybishop

    kybishop
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    I just went and picked up a Jotul 602 this past Sunday. I have looked at them from time to time and this one popped up and I could not pass up the deal. Drove about 5 hours total to pick it up. It looks like it may have only had a fire or two in it. Hardly used.

    I got it for an upstairs room and hallway area with low ceilings (7').

    Can't wait to get it hooked up and try it out. Hole is already in the wall for the stove pipe and goes into the existing chimney. Just need to figure out what I want to do for the pipe and hearth pad.

    Pics are from the sellers add. I have yet to get it out of the back of the car...
     

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  2. Jan Pijpelink

    Jan Pijpelink
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    Looks great!
     
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  3. Kevin Weis

    Kevin Weis
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    Had a small Waterford stove (made in Ireland) that was almost identical to that. For its size it did well. Was a model 101 I believe. Waterford no longer imported to US but I think still make they're way to Canada, no? Kevin
     
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  4. nola mike

    nola mike
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    Beautiful. Can't tell, is that green enamel?
     
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  5. begreen

    begreen
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    That's a nice find. It's a good little stove and a willing heater.
     
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  6. kybishop

    kybishop
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    Thanks, it is a green enamel. I was surprised to find one in this nice of condition.
     
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  7. kybishop

    kybishop
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    I have read that they put out a lot of heat for such a small stove. Nicknamed the "little giant". I believe they are rated for heating 800sf. The room is big but not that big. It is about a 20x20 room but the walls are not insulated, just stone.
     
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  8. begreen

    begreen
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    The stone will suck the heat out of the room so it won't be too big or too hot. Burn dry wood and be careful not to space out closing down the air. The stove heats up quickly. Once the fire is burning well you should be able to turn down the air all the way and then open it just a touch, maybe 1/16 to 1/8". Put a key damper on the stove pipe so that you have more control and more heat.
     
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  9. kybishop

    kybishop
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    Thanks for the suggestions. I will keep all that in mind while learning this stove.

    The key damper is a good idea and I will indeed include one in the pipe. We have one on our Vermont Defiant pipe.

    I have seen some Jotul 602's with cracked back plates. I was wondering what was believed to be the cause to this and ran across your comments about there being no liner on the back. Any advice on how best to avoid cracking the back plate or is it just the nature of the little beast?

    I read your comments here; https://www.hearth.com/talk/threads/jotul-602c-backplate-replacement.102569/

    Thanks.
     
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  10. kybishop

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    We have been through many winters in this old house. The stone will suck the heat out for sure. It retains the heat from summer for a good long while during fall and early winter. It also retains the cold of winter through spring and into the beginning of summer. The walls are about 2 1/2' thick. But once it gets cold, it gets cold for sure.
     
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  11. begreen

    begreen
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    It's a cigar burn stove which normally burns front to back. But if one spaces out and leaves the air open too long then it works like a blowtorch on the back which has no burn plate to protect it. That can rapidly overheat the back and cause it to crack. I made and put in a steel burn plate to protect the rear of the stove after ours got cracked inadvertently by a house sitting friend.
     
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  12. kybishop

    kybishop
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    Good to know.

    Thanks.
     
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  13. peakbagger

    peakbagger
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    Great little stoves. The big thing to realize is that they are not all night heaters. The worse thing you can do is cram one full of wood and then crank the air ports down to get a long overnight burn. Its a recipe for creosote and smog. They were designed to be fed wood as needed to put out heat when you need it. That keeps the stove hot and remarkably efficient (for its era). Get dry wood, keep a variety of sizes of splits kindling and feed when needed. That means it will go out at night and you need to restart it in the morning.

    Of course trying to heat a space with stone walls is basically trying to heat the outdoors. The radiant heat from the stove will heat objects between the stove and the wall but once it hits the wall, the heat heads directly out the wall. The effective R value of stone is just about zero. Anything you can do to put R value between the stone and the room is going to substantially decrease the fuel usage. In the days of stone castles they hung heavy wall hangings over the stone walls to keep the heat in. Its too bad as exposed stone walls (and large impressive stone fireplaces) look great but they really suck the heat out of a space.
     
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  14. BIGChrisNH

    BIGChrisNH
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    Beautiful example of a 602, I love old Jotuls. Nice find and good luck with it.
     
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  15. Bad LP

    Bad LP
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    Spent many hours next to one that my father had.
     
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  16. kybishop

    kybishop
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    This will be our 47th winter with this house. The stone part of the house is not too bad to heat. It gets cold no doubt but there is no furnace currently in this part of the house. When you throw a kerosene heater in one room it heats up pretty nicely. Current renovations are adding multiple heat sources and options since it is a bit isolated and can be cut off with flood waters from time to time.

    The nice characteristics about the stone is that it retains the heat of summer for a good bit during the fall and early winter. It also requires little to no A/C in the summer. The stone holds on to the winter cold for a good long while. I have gone all summer without air conditioning and been comfortable around 78 degrees. Lots of trees and in a river valley.
     
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  17. kybishop

    kybishop
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    I have heard great things about Jotul stoves. A friend of ours has a 118 and really likes it.

    The old has has a heavy Shaker influence and this little 602 has a bit of a Shaker look to it.
     
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  18. wooduser

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    This is all too true. I suppose you probably bought the house for the charm of the stone walls, but have you considered insulating the interior of the stone.

    I'm speaking as the owner of an old leaky house here, so I haven't gotten around to doing that myself!
     

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