Looks like I picked the wrong year to buy two pellet stove oil prices keep dropping....

Bassmantweed Posted By Bassmantweed, Dec 6, 2014 at 11:35 AM

  1. Bioburner

    Bioburner
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    Tried using new smart phone to take picture. Won't beat a cheap Nikon pocket camera.
    Diesel is heavily taxed to pay for roads. Its about $1.50 more per gallon than gas here in central MN and the Gov declared a emergency to allow drivers to drive longer to get more fuel up here as the Bakken crude is causing shortages of it and propain as the pipe and rail is used to get the refined product up is instead pumping crude south.
     
  2. Bioburner

    Bioburner
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    Cool dry place like most of the pellet bags state. Burnt a bag yesterday that was three years old.
     
  3. bags

    bags
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    I think condensation can be as bad as rain over a prolonged period. I noticed a decent amount on some bags on a ton I have which is covered well but open. The pellets in the bag will hold a cooler temp and when it warms up and rains after a colder day the humidity of moist air likes to cling to them. Just a small observation I recently made. They are in a covered area off the side of the barn with an open side. No rain can get to them at all. They were fine but the bags were wet. Might rethink my storage some now.
     
  4. TimfromMA

    TimfromMA
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    Mine are all in my basement.
     
  5. Wilbur Feral

    Wilbur Feral
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    I store mine in a shed we built under our second story deck (house on hill). It is dry but subject to outdoor fluctuations in temperature and humidity throughout the year. I always have somewhere near a quarter to half ton left at the end of the year, and burn those pellets first at the start of the next season. Have never had a problem and notice no difference in performance from the previous year.
     
  6. RickNH

    RickNH
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    Mine are all in my basement along with a geospring and a dehumidifier for summer. It is currently 63 degrees and 58 % humidity. Is this OK ?
     
  7. Bioburner

    Bioburner
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    Off the floor? If so should be good and you have no major temp changes like outside storage to collect moisture.
     
  8. RickNH

    RickNH
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    yes off of the floor.
     
  9. chken

    chken
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    Should be no problem, my 5+ tons are also in my basement with my Geo and my dehumid, and haven't had any issues.
     
  10. SKOAL MAN

    SKOAL MAN
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    It's amazing how quickly posts get off topic here!
     
  11. bags

    bags
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    What topic are you on? Dude, this is all part of the learning process for many people and people do and will stray a bit. Big deal. The moderators here do great job when it gets way off topic and throw out a reminder to get back on topic or they shut it down. Let them do their jobs. I notice you constantly chime in with BS and negative criticism so I will step up and say something.

    The thread is about pellet stoves and oil prices and cost savings of one or the other. We are talking about pellets so I'd say it isn't too far off. Burn the oil if it floats your boat.
     
    Wilbur Feral likes this.
  12. SKOAL MAN

    SKOAL MAN
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    Another reason why I cancelled my Facebook, rambling! I just realized that I can block people who post useless information, awesome!
     
    Pellet-King likes this.
  13. twodogs02

    twodogs02
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    $1.24/gallon propane fill up last week in Upstate, NY. Unbelievable. Using mostly gas now unless temps drop below 10 degrees
     
  14. Jason845845

    Jason845845
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    I've been using oil since Saturday as I'm "between stoves". Every time the furnace fires up it just horrifies me how much oil I go through to heat this tiny house. New stove being delivered and installed today, thank god!
     
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  15. TimfromMA

    TimfromMA
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    I just finished off my first ton of the season.
     
  16. bags

    bags
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    That is doing well! What size place are you doing if you don't mind? Wish I could get that average. Also are you using any other heat source? Thanks.
     
  17. Rock Crusher

    Rock Crusher
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    On 12th bag of pellets, 1/2 cord of wood, zero gallons oil=warm house and lots of smiles!
     
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  18. TimfromMA

    TimfromMA
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    My stove is located on the main upper living level. my main level is about 1800 sqft. I keep the oil thermostat on my lower level set to about 55. Upstairs, the stove thermostat is on 69 when we are home and 65 when we are away.
     
  19. TimfromMA

    TimfromMA
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    I wasn't even aware that was possible. I guess I don't like alot of things.
     
  20. zrtmatos

    zrtmatos
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    Very nice reconditioning.
     
  21. bags

    bags
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    Ha ha ha!::-) Tim, Thanks for the explanation. Ya LIKE that pellet heat now don't ya?;)
     
  22. TimfromMA

    TimfromMA
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    Pellet heat might be taking a vacation if oil goes much lower.
     
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  23. bags

    bags
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    That's understandable. You have to do what makes economic sense. Subject to change daily of course. I hope oil keeps going down. Everyone has been gouged way too long as is.
     
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  24. CaptSpiff

    CaptSpiff
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    Jan 13, 2014
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    The standard Oil Burner Head uses a replaceable nozzle which can be found in many local Home D's. The nozzle is rated by x.xx gal/hr and by the mist pattern it produces. The mist pattern is recommended by the manufacturer to best fill the firebox, and the rated gal/hr is assuming a 100psi constant pump pressure.

    Your boiler/furnace has a Max Input rating on a steel plate label, and you can divide that by 140,000 for the absolute maximum allowable nozzle size.
    Example: Old 160K Utica Boiler: 160000 / 140000 = 1.14 is the max allowed nozzle size.

    Back in the day, I usually undersized by 10%, but would frequently go down by 25-30% if the customer complained of frequent boiler short cycling (on/off).

    To answer your question, the best way to measure the supply rate is to install a small (1 1/2 inch ish) 200 psi pressure gauge on the pump port made for that purpose.

    The gauge makes it easier to adjust the flame (only the air ratio remains) when the pump pressure is in spec. And it also gives advance warning of clogged filters when the needle starts vibrating.
     
  25. CaptSpiff

    CaptSpiff
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    Jan 13, 2014
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    Yup, done for the greater good.
    Not every town gets an off-ramp from the Interstate. Grease baby!
    Now shut up and pay your grease,... I mean taxes. :p

    ** definition of "greater good" is what benefits the wigs in capitol city.

    On a serious note, New England desperately needs 2 new supply pipelines (transmission pipelines). During last years cold snap the existing NG supply was withheld from industrial users, to ensure there would be enough for residential heating. Almost sent the electric sector (ISO-NE) into a tailspin looking for replacement energy. Coal piles were frozen, oil generators weren't even bidding in the market because the high fuel cost, came close to initiating rolling area blackouts. Consequences baby,... consequences.
     
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