Masonry chimney for new construction

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wrightgj

New Member
Nov 20, 2018
1
OH
Good morning - we'll be building a new home in the next year or two, and I'm looking at a wood burning insert. We have a fireplace in our current home, and I like the ambiance, but not the efficiency, so I think an insert will better marry the two.

Question is, what kind of setup do I need to have built? I was thinking I could do a regular masonry firebox (or prefab like Isokern?), which would lead into a wood-framed chimney with the stainless steel liner, similar to what you see in a lot of new construction these days. The fireplace is not on an exterior wall, so only the top part of the chimney will be exposed (and I'd like to put a stone veneer on it to match the front).

Is this even possible? Or do I need a full brick chimney? I'd like to save some expense on the chimney, since most of it won't even be visible, but don't know if a masonry firebox terminating into a metal chimney is compatible.

Thanks!
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
96,254
South Puget Sound, WA
If building new you don't need to go to the expense of building a full masonry structure to house an insert. A quality EPA zero clearance fireplace will give you the best of both worlds at a fraction of the cost. This would have a metal chimney which can be chased. The interior face can have a stone, brick or veneer or clean face depending on the desired style and look. Same for chase if it is exterior.

Take a look at some units like the RSF Pearl and Opal, Kozy Z42, Quadrafire 7100, Pacific Energy FP30, Valcourt Lafayette, etc.. An additional benefit is that the heat is ductable on some of these units which can help warm remote locations and even out the warmth.
 

Simonkenton

Minister of Fire
Feb 27, 2014
2,230
Marshall NC
Skip the masonry altogether. Not needed, and it is expensive and more trouble to maintain.
 

Chas0218

Minister of Fire
Sep 20, 2015
535
Beaver Dams New York
Like everyone has said skip the masonry chimney. You will be spending a lot more in the long run, you'll need some sort of insulated liner that will cost as much as a triple wall chimney and that doesn't count the cost of building the masonry chimney.
 

maple1

Minister of Fire
Sep 15, 2011
10,963
Nova Scotia
We have two chimneys. Stainless Class A, side by side, straight up through the roof. Easiest, cheapest & likely least problematic way to do it.
 
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Bad LP

Minister of Fire
Nov 28, 2014
2,001
Northern Maine
I have 3 flues in my masonry chimney built in 2006. Not sure what that would have cost in stainless steel insulated pipe with two runs of 35+/- plus another of run of 25. Not to mention possibly needing the guys to work in conjunction with the mason. The nearest FP shop is an hour and a half on dry roads.

I never priced it out so I really don't know.

The stone work takes a lot more time than the block and tile work. The stone is thru the LR and up into the MBR for a total of about 16 feet. Have no idea what that kind of weight would rest on. Never thought about it or seen it done.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
30,109
central pa
I have 3 flues in my masonry chimney built in 2006. Not sure what that would have cost in stainless steel insulated pipe with two runs of 35+/- plus another of run of 25. Not to mention possibly needing the guys to work in conjunction with the mason. The nearest FP shop is an hour and a half on dry roads.

I never priced it out so I really don't know.

The stone work takes a lot more time than the block and tile work. The stone is thru the LR and up into the MBR for a total of about 16 feet. Have no idea what that kind of weight would rest on. Never thought about it or seen it done.
Doing a full masonry fireplace will typically run roughly 3x the cost of a higheffiencey prefab fireplace. Only about 2x if you face the prefab in masonry. But then if you want heat you will need to add an insert and liner. Easily another 5k
 
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