Mount Vernon AE will not draft on Windy Days

Jim.Garrison Posted By Jim.Garrison, Jun 22, 2017 at 4:13 PM

  1. Jim.Garrison

    Jim.Garrison
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    Jun 22, 2017
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    Hello,

    I have an Mt Vernon AE since 2007. It was installed when the house was built. I do not have a chimney, so the pipe is vented straight out the back of the house, does a 90 degree and runs 5 feet up. All these years I have lived with the fact that when the winds get above 15 Miles and hour, I must turn the stove off because the flame dies, it smokes and it just doesn't draft. This year I am on a mission to fix the situation.

    My assumption is the pipe must terminate above the roof line? Is that most likely the cuase?
    Also, will installing an outside air kit help with draft issues.


    Thank you,

    Jim
     
  2. vinny11950

    vinny11950
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    May 17, 2010
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    Wow, 15 mph sounds extreme to be messing with stove draft.

    Any pictures of the inside and outside pipe run?

    What size exhaust pipe and brand do you have? Does it meet your stove EVL requirements?

    Do you clean it often, and are you sure there are no obstructions in the exhaust run?

    How well does the exhaust motor work? It could be defective now and not able to push out like it should.

    That's where I would start looking.

    And finally, you could have a setup that faces the wind at just the correct angle and kills draft. But it would be rare.
     
  3. Jim.Garrison

    Jim.Garrison
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    Jun 22, 2017
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    Appreciate the reply. Here is a pic of the outside run. It faces NW, the prevailing wind direction here. I clean it regularly. No issues, except flame dies and smokes when windy. Replaced lots of parts over the years, including blower a few years ago. Runs like a champ, when no wind. I can't help but think the wind creates the problem, and I need to get above the roof line. But I really don't know.
     

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  4. vinny11950

    vinny11950
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    May 17, 2010
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    What diameter is the pipe and what brand is it?

    And I can't tell what type of termination cap you have on it, if any. I guess a closer pic would help. Basically I am thinking the stove exhaust run is giving the exhaust blower motor too much resistance, so when the wind blows to a certain point, the blower motor can't overcome the added resistance value.

    When you suffer the issues, if you open a window in the house, does the fire get better?

    But you want to rule out other factors before spending big money changing pipes and extending the pipe run above the roof line.

    Oh, and welcome to the Forum, Jim.
     
    mralias likes this.
  5. Jim.Garrison

    Jim.Garrison
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    Jun 22, 2017
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    The pipe is 4 " duravent double walled. I have not tried opening a window. I habe tried many configurations of the outside run. I even built a run structure around it to try and shield the effects of the wind with no results. Tore the monstrosity down when it failed to achieve any results. Any thoughts on adding an open air kit? Thank you again. Jim.
     

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  6. mralias

    mralias
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    Apr 29, 2008
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    As Vinny stated, opening the window has my vote. That should tell you if you need OAK. Opening window don't cost nothing. Might be a tight house. Based on the pics, I don't think EVL is an issue as you have 4".
     
  7. Lake Girl

    Lake Girl
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    My vote is for an outside air kit...
     
  8. doghouse

    doghouse
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    Dec 9, 2008
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    . . . and maybe a different end cap. I've never had good results with the type you have. I prefer the hood type. Oh yea, get the OAK.
     
  9. Jonkman

    Jonkman
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    I second the different end cap, get a hood type one and install an OAK. Be sure to update us this fall if you do these upgrades, I am curious the solution. Thanks.
     
  10. kappel15

    kappel15
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    I would run just straight out and put a cap on it like is on dryer vents, to block wind issues. And as others have stated, opening a window is an easy and cheap way to see if you need an oak. kap
     
  11. MadMax31

    MadMax31
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    Jan 2, 2015
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    I went straight out roof for that very reason. High winds all winter.

    You should look into extending the vertical pipe 3' above that little roof and using a high wind cap like a standard furnace or hanging heater uses.

    My flue piping creates a natural draft when its warm ( stack effect ) Just verify max length of flue piping in manual, should you exceed, up size to 4".
     
  12. Highbeam

    Highbeam
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    He's already got 4".
     
  13. hooter04

    hooter04
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    Dec 5, 2010
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    Here,s my thing I tried to go directly out on the prevailing wind side and it corroded the siding with carbon no less ,so I vented it verticle to roof line and it drafts much better than the stove that I have on opposite side of house,with less ash besides
     

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