My childhood Grandma Bear

Skeetrockfarms

New Member
Jan 1, 2021
4
VA / KY border
Hi, I’m new to this site and am excited to be here! Recently I was fortunate enough to be able to recover the stove from my boyhood home. It was rusty but all in all in good shape, I’ve been sanding on it and found some info on the back, it’s a stamp and reads “DBGM 2866”, I’m curious if anyone knows anything about this? I have more to talk about but I’ll close this for now. Hoping to hear from someone that knows a lot more than I do! Thanks!!

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Todd67

Minister of Fire
Jun 25, 2012
938
Northern NY
Welcome to the forum! It looks like a Grandma Bear that was made by the Dunn Brothers. The numbers probably mean that your stove was the 2866th stove they made. DBGM = Dunn Brothers Grandma.

Coaly is our Fisher subject matter expert. Hopefully he will check in soon to share his knowledge.
 

Skeetrockfarms

New Member
Jan 1, 2021
4
VA / KY border
Thanks for the info, would you have any idea by looking how old this stove is? It seems I remember Dad buying it new sometime in the late ‘70s...so many cold mornings I remember sitting by that stove! I’m so thankful to have it, I want to do a good job restoring it, my wife and I are having a basement built and plan on using it. I’m wondering what is the best thing to sand it with, the tight places that I can’t get to with my angle grinder that is, what would be the best thing to use? Any suggestions? And thanks in advance!
Bradley
 

coaly

Fisher Moderator
Staff member
Dec 22, 2007
4,053
NE PA
Yep, 2,866 th stove from Walt, George and Roy Dunn. They were the license holders for VA and W. VA.

You’ll be amazed how easily that stove cleans up like new. Grease the hinge pins and bolt threads good with high temp grease or silver anti-seize to prevent wear of the moving parts.

Waiting on the story of how you found it, or if it left your family’s possession for a while. Every stove has a story, and older ones, many times like a home, was the only one needed for a lifetime. Take care of it and it will outlast you as well. Can’t say that for many things anymore.
 

coaly

Fisher Moderator
Staff member
Dec 22, 2007
4,053
NE PA
I wet them down with kero or diesel to prevent dust and hit them with a wire wheel in a drill or angle grinder/ polisher or what ever you have. Much quicker than sanding. Wipe with mineral spirits when done, and finally with lacquer thinner before paint. Stove Bright Satin Black is the color and paint you want for original look.
Probably 77 or 78 at the latest due to having 4 fin draft caps that were changed to 5 fin about that time. Fabricators had old parts to use up, so exact dating is difficult.
 

Skeetrockfarms

New Member
Jan 1, 2021
4
VA / KY border
Thanks for the input Coaly. You’ve gave me a lot of help. As for how I was reunited with the stove, I was injured in a coal mining accident years ago and like many other of the men around here that are injured, I developed a problem with the pain meds. To make a long story shorter, I ended up going to prison for some time, while away, my dad passed and upon my release and retuning home , finding much of his house looted, the old Fischer was still there. I’m the only one left of my immediate family so this stove means a lot to me. Another question, I’ve finished reworking a lot of the stove, what could I put on the metal to keep it from rusting while I finish the rest? Something that will be easy to remove before painting? Again, thanks in advance!
Bradley
 

coaly

Fisher Moderator
Staff member
Dec 22, 2007
4,053
NE PA
I use PB Blaster, kero, or diesel fuel when wire wheeling to prevent dust. It keeps it from rusting if I don't get back to it too. WD-40 is fine, old auto transmission fluid, whatever you have really. A wire wheel in a drill is usually sufficient and the quickest. Then wipe with mineral spirits. Before paint I wipe with lacquer thinner to remove any oils. High temp paints are soft until fired for final cure.

Don't touch the draft caps with anything abrasive. They are soft aluminum. Can't tell by the pic, but some had unpainted edges. If so, paint and wipe the edges with mineral spirits before dry. Depending on their finish, I can give you tips on original edge details.

Thanks for the back story. That makes this a very special Grandma Bear. You're lucky they didn't take the doors for scrap metal! If they were smart they would know those air dampers are worth something too. Finding doors is not only difficult, but the patterns that cast them were all a little different. So when the stove was made it was laid on its back and doors centered on door seal. Then the hinge plates are tacked into position. Another set of doors doesn't simply line up with the hinge plates. They need to be ground off and re-welded in position for the new doors. A real pain.

Definitely take care of lubing the hinge pins and air damper bolts if you put it back into operation or not. The hinge pins should remove by hand easily. Wire wheel them clean and coat with anti-seize. The damper bolts you can coat with anti seize through the opening on the back of the door into the intake without removing. Keeping those two things greased will assure the stove outlives you.

Post some final pics and keep in touch. Lots of help here bringing it back to original and help with a safe installation.
 

kennyp2339

Minister of Fire
Feb 16, 2014
5,498
07462
I’m the only one left of my immediate family so this stove means a lot to me
I suppose that even with all the newer tech out there, that stove you have will keep you & your wife the warmest. Best of luck with it, also check out some of the other threads in the fischer area, you may want to consider installing a baffle place to help with a higher efficiency burn.
 

Skeetrockfarms

New Member
Jan 1, 2021
4
VA / KY border
Yeah, I wouldn’t trade my stove for anyone out there, period!! Could you tell me more about installing a baffle? Is it necessary? I’m not really concerned about burning a little extra wood, I live on 50 acres, (so very blessed!), with about 30 acres in mostly hard woods, so wood isn’t a problem...and I do remember mom opening the drafts and throwing a little wood on in the morning,I’m sure this Grandma will keep overnight... but please tell me more about any good ideas. By the way, almost ready to paint this stove. Thanks again everyone!!
Bradley
 

coaly

Fisher Moderator
Staff member
Dec 22, 2007
4,053
NE PA
A baffle plate is highly recommended.

It needs to be designed for the chimney, not the stove. Later double door models had a factory baffle. Since it was common to connect them to an existing chimney for a fireplace, they had to leave a lot of heat up the chimney to keep it clean. With insulated liners and indoor chimneys you don’t need as much heat escaping the stove. The object is keeping the internal flue gas temperature above 250*f. when smoke is present, all the way to the top. You need a pipe thermometer to do that. A magnetic surface thermometer will read about 1/2 the actual flue gas temp. Then allow for cooling as it rises. Below 250* water vapor from combustion condenses on flue walls allowing smoke particles to stick. This is creosote.

So it depends on pipe configuration (cools exhaust gasses and adds resistance) and chimney diameter, height and insulation.

A straight up system with insulated flue can be baffled the most for the highest efficiency. The opening above baffle the smoke travels through cannot be any smaller than the square inch diameter of pipe and flue.

By making a cardboard template, you can measure the opening and adjust the angle and size until you get what you want. I added what Fisher designed as the Smoke Shelf Baffle for the double door stoves in 1980 to the single door stoves and started this thread that many have used and adapted to their installation with great success;