My new wood scroung truck

Woodsplitter67

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2017
1,616
Woolwich nj
Saw your post this summer, have you had any issues with your truck? And perhaps more specifically any issues with the fuel pump?
I have had no issues with this truck. The last ford truck I purchased for my self.. the one I traded in also had no issues..I purchased that truck new in 2013 and traded it in with I think 185000 miles and had only changed the oil and did filters..that truck had alot of hard miles on it towing my 10k trac machine....
 
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MMH

Member
Jan 21, 2019
223
NV
I have had no issues with this truck. The last ford truck I purchased for my self.. the one I traded in also had no issues..I purchased that truck new in 2013 and traded it in with I think 185000 miles and had only changed the oil and did filters..that truck had alot of hard miles on it towing my 10k trac machine....
Glad to hear, thanks for the reply; I’ve been looking at upgrading this year also. I looked at all lines, diesel and gas. As for the diesels, Chevy/gm has issues with fuel pumps resulting in class action suit they changed the pumps a few years ago. Ford also has this pump and also has a class action suit ongoing, although they’ve been using this pump for almost a decade as I understand; ram recently moved to this same pump in 2019, as is about to be part of the suit from what I’ve read. So, I’ve been quite hesitant and have been inquiring from those that have some of them.
 

ABMax24

Minister of Fire
Glad to hear, thanks for the reply; I’ve been looking at upgrading this year also. I looked at all lines, diesel and gas. As for the diesels, Chevy/gm has issues with fuel pumps resulting in class action suit they changed the pumps a few years ago. Ford also has this pump and also has a class action suit ongoing, although they’ve been using this pump for almost a decade as I understand; ram recently moved to this same pump in 2019, as is about to be part of the suit from what I’ve read. So, I’ve been quite hesitant and have been inquiring from those that have some of them.
I'm not sure about the Duramax, but the Powerstroke had the CP4 fuel pump upgraded from 2015 onward. IMO it's a frivolous lawsuit, keep contaminants like sediment and especially water out of the pump and they seem to last. The problem is if they do fail they take out the injectors with it.

I've got a 2014 6.7 Powerstroke, I've had it 7 years and 143,000 km, it is by far the most reliable vehicle I have ever owned, tires have by far been the largest expense as far as maintenance goes.

I know you mentioned the 6.4 powerstroke in an earlier post, stay as far away from that engine as you can, they are absolute junk.
Water pumps that leak coolant into the engine oil in the event of a failure.
Excessive wear on cylinders 7 and 8 from raw diesel being injected for DPF regen, this also dilutes the engine oil and creates other lack of lubrication issues, cam wear, ring wear, excessive blowby.
Turbo failure, see lack of lubrication, also from a poor arrangement, these turbos need a wastegate to control boost, Ford decided to use the EGR valve for this instead, under certain conditions the turbos overspeed. The EGR valve, fixed geometry larger turbo, and small VGT turbo don't offer enough control.
Fuel pumps also suffer from similar failures as the CP4 if ingesting water and contaminants.
Lots of these trucks were tuned because the large fuel pump and twin turbos had huge potential, cracked cylinder heads and melted pistons can be results of poor tuning. Buyer beware on any used 6.4. Deleted trucks have almost always been tuned.
Almost all work is "cab off" making repairs more costly.
Inefficient DPF regens, 20% economy gains can be seen by deleting the DPF. This however is illegal in almost every jurisdiction in North America.

Really the 6.4 was an engineering disaster, it was the last engine Navistar built for Ford, and it only lasted 3 model years. IMO even the 6.0 powerstroke is a better engine, at least there are aftermarket parts to make them more reliable; FICM, head studs, etc.
 

Woodsplitter67

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2017
1,616
Woolwich nj
I agree with above.. The 6.4 was junk. I had 1 and got rid of it after 4 years it really started having issues. this was a work truck. Im still running a 2006 F550 with a 6.0 in it with an EGR delete.. with over 225k on it and it still pulls hard. I have 5 dumps with the 6.7 and haven't had any issues.
 
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MMH

Member
Jan 21, 2019
223
NV
I'm not sure about the Duramax, but the Powerstroke had the CP4 fuel pump upgraded from 2015 onward. IMO it's a frivolous lawsuit, keep contaminants like sediment and especially water out of the pump and they seem to last. The problem is if they do fail they take out the injectors with it.

I've got a 2014 6.7 Powerstroke, I've had it 7 years and 143,000 km, it is by far the most reliable vehicle I have ever owned, tires have by far been the largest expense as far as maintenance goes.

I know you mentioned the 6.4 powerstroke in an earlier post, stay as far away from that engine as you can, they are absolute junk.
Water pumps that leak coolant into the engine oil in the event of a failure.
Excessive wear on cylinders 7 and 8 from raw diesel being injected for DPF regen, this also dilutes the engine oil and creates other lack of lubrication issues, cam wear, ring wear, excessive blowby.
Turbo failure, see lack of lubrication, also from a poor arrangement, these turbos need a wastegate to control boost, Ford decided to use the EGR valve for this instead, under certain conditions the turbos overspeed. The EGR valve, fixed geometry larger turbo, and small VGT turbo don't offer enough control.
Fuel pumps also suffer from similar failures as the CP4 if ingesting water and contaminants.
Lots of these trucks were tuned because the large fuel pump and twin turbos had huge potential, cracked cylinder heads and melted pistons can be results of poor tuning. Buyer beware on any used 6.4. Deleted trucks have almost always been tuned.
Almost all work is "cab off" making repairs more costly.
Inefficient DPF regens, 20% economy gains can be seen by deleting the DPF. This however is illegal in almost every jurisdiction in North America.

Really the 6.4 was an engineering disaster, it was the last engine Navistar built for Ford, and it only lasted 3 model years. IMO even the 6.0 powerstroke is a better engine, at least there are aftermarket parts to make them more reliable; FICM, head studs, etc.
Duramax went to denso; powerstroke are still using cp4 (although I think they upgraded to “cp4.2”), ram just went to cp4 in 2019 models, they “upgraded” to cp4.2 in 2020, and it’s just shy of confirmed (from what I understand) that they went back to cp3 for 21. The 6.4 I was referring to was another post had a ram remi. Now to the just keep it clean and without water/contaminants; I think most people agree and do that, however nobody deliberately puts that into their vehicles. they’re are tales riddled through the forums of “filling up at reputable stations”, or “draining separator”, or “changing filters religiously” etc, only to have this thing implode, destroy their fuel system, or worse the entire engine, and then get stuck with a 8-25k bill (depending on how much imploded) because they claim fuel contamination/water and void the warranty. Now, also I must achkonowledge they’re probabaly thousands upon thousands of these vehicles on the road without problems. Anyways, I just try to ask people who are currently running them what there experiences are; thank you for the advice on the 6.4 though appreciate it.
 

MoDoug

Feeling the Heat
Feb 3, 2018
310
NE Missouri
Interesting post, I'm in the slow process of replacing my truck. I've got a 2006 F250 with the 6.0 diesel. Now there's an engine known for problems and it's lived up to it's reputation for me. Bought it off my brother in law. Right now, the problems seem to be ironed out, and part of me wants to keep it. But it's time to upgrade. I don't mind going Ford, Chevy or Dodge when I find the right truck.
 

ABMax24

Minister of Fire
Duramax went to denso; powerstroke are still using cp4 (although I think they upgraded to “cp4.2”), ram just went to cp4 in 2019 models, they “upgraded” to cp4.2 in 2020, and it’s just shy of confirmed (from what I understand) that they went back to cp3 for 21. The 6.4 I was referring to was another post had a ram remi. Now to the just keep it clean and without water/contaminants; I think most people agree and do that, however nobody deliberately puts that into their vehicles. they’re are tales riddled through the forums of “filling up at reputable stations”, or “draining separator”, or “changing filters religiously” etc, only to have this thing implode, destroy their fuel system, or worse the entire engine, and then get stuck with a 8-25k bill (depending on how much imploded) because they claim fuel contamination/water and void the warranty. Now, also I must achkonowledge they’re probabaly thousands upon thousands of these vehicles on the road without problems. Anyways, I just try to ask people who are currently running them what there experiences are; thank you for the advice on the 6.4 though appreciate it.
We currently have a 6.7 work truck in the shop getting a new CP4 and new injectors, this truck has been plagued with water in fuel issues for the last 2 years, personally I believe that there is a small hole in the top of the fuel tank below the fifth wheel hitch allowing water in causing the problem. The bill will be $9k, Ford sells a kit that includes all parts to replace if a CP4 fails. If someone is paying more than $10k for this fix the mechanic is ripping them off. Unless something else fails, but I don't see how lack of fuel from the pump or injectors would cause issues, the truck would just shut off.

Buying any vehicle is always a gamble. I can tell you 2 things, our city of 67,000 people has thousands of 6.7 powerstrokes running around, and the diesel shops keep a cp4 and injector kit on the shelf. With that many trucks there will always be a few failures, but the vast majority are without issue. The problem with the internet is you usually only see the bad reviews, most times happy customers don't let the world know about it, un-happy ones do.

When fueling up I always try to go to the newest fuel station (in hopes the fuel tanks are the cleanest with lower chances of leaks to allow water in). I also fuel up at the busiest station, ensuring fresh fuel. I have used the same station for 3 years now no issues, it's the busiest in town and also the newest, they receive at least a B-train tanker load of fuel everyday. I also change my fuel filters on time, I also inspect them for signs of dirt or contaminants on the filters. My filters usually come out very clean, if they come out black or full of debris I'd be switching fuel stations.
 

MMH

Member
Jan 21, 2019
223
NV
We currently have a 6.7 work truck in the shop getting a new CP4 and new injectors, this truck has been plagued with water in fuel issues for the last 2 years, personally I believe that there is a small hole in the top of the fuel tank below the fifth wheel hitch allowing water in causing the problem. The bill will be $9k, Ford sells a kit that includes all parts to replace if a CP4 fails. If someone is paying more than $10k for this fix the mechanic is ripping them off. Unless something else fails, but I don't see how lack of fuel from the pump or injectors would cause issues, the truck would just shut off.

Buying any vehicle is always a gamble. I can tell you 2 things, our city of 67,000 people has thousands of 6.7 powerstrokes running around, and the diesel shops keep a cp4 and injector kit on the shelf. With that many trucks there will always be a few failures, but the vast majority are without issue. The problem with the internet is you usually only see the bad reviews, most times happy customers don't let the world know about it, un-happy ones do.

When fueling up I always try to go to the newest fuel station (in hopes the fuel tanks are the cleanest with lower chances of leaks to allow water in). I also fuel up at the busiest station, ensuring fresh fuel. I have used the same station for 3 years now no issues, it's the busiest in town and also the newest, they receive at least a B-train tanker load of fuel everyday. I also change my fuel filters on time, I also inspect them for signs of dirt or contaminants on the filters. My filters usually come out very clean, if they come out black or full of debris I'd be switching fuel stations.
Yeah totally agree with this; I think given the number of v
We currently have a 6.7 work truck in the shop getting a new CP4 and new injectors, this truck has been plagued with water in fuel issues for the last 2 years, personally I believe that there is a small hole in the top of the fuel tank below the fifth wheel hitch allowing water in causing the problem. The bill will be $9k, Ford sells a kit that includes all parts to replace if a CP4 fails. If someone is paying more than $10k for this fix the mechanic is ripping them off. Unless something else fails, but I don't see how lack of fuel from the pump or injectors would cause issues, the truck would just shut off.

Buying any vehicle is always a gamble. I can tell you 2 things, our city of 67,000 people has thousands of 6.7 powerstrokes running around, and the diesel shops keep a cp4 and injector kit on the shelf. With that many trucks there will always be a few failures, but the vast majority are without issue. The problem with the internet is you usually only see the bad reviews, most times happy customers don't let the world know about it, un-happy ones do.

When fueling up I always try to go to the newest fuel station (in hopes the fuel tanks are the cleanest with lower chances of leaks to allow water in). I also fuel up at the busiest station, ensuring fresh fuel. I have used the same station for 3 years now no issues, it's the busiest in town and also the newest, they receive at least a B-train tanker load of fuel everyday. I also change my fuel filters on time, I also inspect them for signs of dirt or contaminants on the filters. My filters usually come out very clean, if they come out black or full of debris I'd be switching fuel stations.
Yeah I totally agree with this, alas nobody goes online to not complain. I think overall with the amount of these vehicle lines on the road, the problem is likely quite small by numbers/percentage. I’d think 1-3% but I wouldn’t be terribly surprised if it’s a little higher. We had Chevy ambulances and they all imploded, if I remember correctly out of 5 we had to rebuild the fuel system in 3 of them, 1 or 2 was multiple times. If I understand correctly the people paying more than 8 ish grand is for a total engine replacement as they have metal shavings contaminating the entire engine. But overall I agree this is likely not as bad as it seems on the inter webs
 

WoodScrounger

New Member
Oct 11, 2020
42
Ontario
I think a lot of problems with fuel system issues in pickups could be solved with good quality lubricity additives , applied in consistent mix volume . They also tend to cheap out on filtration and do dumb things with fuel systems, like GM did for years. They didn’t have factory installed supply (lift )pumps for the CP3 pump which can easily cause hi pressure pump cavitation issues .
I don’t know for sure but I suspect the issues with the CP4 pumps are related to cavitation as well.
On modern diesels with the high pressures and tight tolerances an adequate supply of CLEAN fuel is necessary at all times. Some engine manufacturers have designed fuel systems so that if the supply pump doesn’t produce enough pressure they will shut down or even not crank on start up.
 
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lsucet

Minister of Fire
May 14, 2015
1,667
San Ysidro, New Mexico
I work for Chrysler in a Dodge/Ram dealer. We have been having some issues with fuel systems on 19 and 20 MY trucks. Lubricants additive to the system is not recommended at all. People and places insist on that but we do not recommended at all. Some manufactures recommend cetane boost for cold climate cause the fuel blend in winters.

Lubricants can create foaming when going through the high pressure system.
At this point is uncertain if the issue can be due to a bad batch of pump like many cases in the past. We have to provide pictures of the system including pictures from the high pressure pump tag that has the serial number, manufacture date etc. Maybe they still looking into it to see if the concern is due to a bad batch going by the serial number or manufactured date etc.
When we diagnose a fuel system we never look into of the pressure of the low side/supply side of the system. It is about volume, no pressure. Pressure is part of the high pressure side. Volume supply to the high pressure system can be affected by many variants depending the system in used. Latest systems fuel filters being the most common issues, weak in tank pump, restrictions etc.
 
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MMH

Member
Jan 21, 2019
223
NV
I work for Chrysler in a Dodge/Ram dealer. We have been having some issues with fuel systems on 19 and 20 MY trucks. Lubricants additive to the system is not recommended at all. People and places insist on that but we do not recommended at all. Some manufactures recommend cetane boost for cold climate cause the fuel blend in winters.

Lubricants can create foaming when going through the high pressure system.
At this point is uncertain if the issue can be due to a bad batch of pump like many cases in the past. We have to provide pictures of the system including pictures from the high pressure pump tag that has the serial number, manufacture date etc. Maybe they still looking into it to see if the concern is due to a bad batch going by the serial number or manufactured date etc.
When we diagnose a fuel system we never look into of the pressure of the low side/supply side of the system. It is about volume, no pressure. Pressure is part of the high pressure side. Volume supply to the high pressure system can be affected by many variants depending the system in used. Latest systems fuel filters being the most common issues, weak in tank pump, restrictions etc.
Thank you for the reply, quite helpful and on par with most of the consensus I’ve been seeing. From what I understand initially people thought this was a lube issue, and therefore was adding additives for lubricity. However, it seems the issue is water in the pump, or air, or a volume issue as you indicated. It seems as though 2019 was not very good, 2020 models seemed to have better results with the cp4.2 and then perhaps a bad batch as you said. It appears ram went back to cp3 for 21 models. To the OP my apologies for high jacking your thread and turning it into a pump-a-thon. I’ll leave the dead horse alone! Nice truck btw!