Need wood stove/insert consultation

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Hogwildz

Minister of Fire
Excuse me!!! Not sure how asking you to clarify your statement pissed you off but you need to lighten up. I know some inserts heat fairly well without the fan. Yes a fan will increase the output on them but as you say in some cases they are not vital. Am i not allowed to ask questions about stoves i have little experience with?
I miss read your reply to my original post, and posted my reply. Then I saw your question afterwards. I owe you an apology, I fkd up. I think we are on the same page. Sorry brother, no excuse, I jumped before I read and thought.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
25,484
central pa
I miss read your reply to my original post, and posted my reply. Then I saw your question afterwards. I owe you an apology, I fkd up. I think we are on the same page. Sorry brother, no excuse, I jumped before I read and thought.
No prob
 

schwaggly

Burning Hunk
Sep 23, 2009
198
n.shore ma
I have the same issue. We moved into a split 2.5 yrs ago that is prone to outages. I put in a beautiful enamel regency insert upstairs. Downstairs is a nightmare. I has to block flue on both ends with roxul to keep basement from smelling like soot. The down draft is brutal at 25ish ft. The hearth extends 8 inches. Im hoping an exhaust fan does the trick. An insulated 6 inch liner might not fit, the 6 on first insert barely fit. Pics and measurements forthcoming. I do like hogwildz counter point on insert fans. I do use one and find it necessary but there is no be all end all solution.
 

schwaggly

Burning Hunk
Sep 23, 2009
198
n.shore ma
20180910_090606.jpg
Chimney is on exterior and I want a cook surface.
 

Ashful

Minister of Fire
Mar 7, 2012
15,715
Philadelphia
Downstairs is a nightmare. I has to block flue on both ends with roxul to keep basement from smelling like soot. The down draft is brutal at 25ish ft. The hearth extends 8 inches. Im hoping an exhaust fan does the trick.

Maybe I’m reading you wrong, but wouldn’t an exhaust fan in the house make any downdraft issue worse?
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
89,548
South Puget Sound, WA
I have the same issue. We moved into a split 2.5 yrs ago that is prone to outages. I put in a beautiful enamel regency insert upstairs. Downstairs is a nightmare. I has to block flue on both ends with roxul to keep basement from smelling like soot. The down draft is brutal at 25ish ft. The hearth extends 8 inches. Im hoping an exhaust fan does the trick. An insulated 6 inch liner might not fit, the 6 on first insert barely fit. Pics and measurements forthcoming. I do like hogwildz counter point on insert fans. I do use one and find it necessary but there is no be all end all solution.
Do both chimneys terminate at close to the same height? If so that could be the problem. Elevating the 1st floor's flue may address this issue.
 

schwaggly

Burning Hunk
Sep 23, 2009
198
n.shore ma
Inline exhaust fan would be on the back of stove before cleanout to push smoke up chimney. Stack height would be a possibility but upstairs stove was not lit, this is more of a barometric pressure thing. It smelled like wet soot on a cooler overcast day, gross. Alot of people use a balloon contraption to remedy this but I had roxul on hand and didnt want to spend X amount of dollars and wait a week.
 

schwaggly

Burning Hunk
Sep 23, 2009
198
n.shore ma
Thanks for input. Im looking at a russo c/w or a nightingale both rear vent and will fit and both are cheap from my buddies massive collection of guy stuff. Any thoughts.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
25,484
central pa
Inline exhaust fan would be on the back of stove before cleanout to push smoke up chimney. Stack height would be a possibility but upstairs stove was not lit, this is more of a barometric pressure thing. It smelled like wet soot on a cooler overcast day, gross. Alot of people use a balloon contraption to remedy this but I had roxul on hand and didnt want to spend X amount of dollars and wait a week.
You dont want a fan in the pipe.
 

schwaggly

Burning Hunk
Sep 23, 2009
198
n.shore ma
You dont want a fan in the pipe.
Why? I thought that was a thing. Inline draft inducing fan.
Are there any other work arounds?
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
25,484
central pa
Why? I thought that was a thing. Inline draft inducing fan.
Are there any other work arounds?
It is a thing yes. But it is a horrible thing that tries (usually unsuccessfully) to fix a problrm that should be addressed in other ways.
 

Hogwildz

Minister of Fire
Agreed on no fan inline on the pipe. BeGreen brought up a good question, that I am not sure was answered. If both flues same height, side by side, one will down draft the other that is not being used. If the issue is during warmer months that they are not being used, I'd block it off at bottom, or cap it off at top till burn season. Both stoves should have their own stacks. I think you may have some negative pressure going on in the basement, as the basement is typically cooler, and that stack wouldn't normally be down drafting in the warmer weather at least. Appliances in basement may be sucking air down that flue?
 
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missedbass

Member
Mar 6, 2012
110
long island
When I ran my insert 24/7 for a few days with my boiler off I would get a downdraft in the boiler chimney. Now I crack a window in the basement to provide some make up air and all is good
 

schwaggly

Burning Hunk
Sep 23, 2009
198
n.shore ma
Thanks for responses. I have a better gameplan now.
 

schwaggly

Burning Hunk
Sep 23, 2009
198
n.shore ma
Just picked up a very nice clean Nightingale 101 for short money.
For my basement insert. Wifey says
its not as pretty as our enamel Regency/Hampton upstairs. Came with nice glass. It was wrapped in a blanket and tucked away before the dolly was unloaded, I learned that lesson the hard way years ago.
20180915_131950.jpg 20180915_132022.jpg
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
89,548
South Puget Sound, WA
It won't be as pretty in the fuel consumption dept either. Are you going to call it Florence?
 

Freep

New Member
Aug 26, 2018
9
Pacific Northwest, USA
Update: I went with the Lopi Revere. I decided to have it professionally installed: If there's ever something I don't want to mess up, it's installing a fireplace. Maybe next time. My initial impressions are positive. It's smaller than I expected, but does seem to crank out the heat. I'm having a hard time getting it to burn without smoke coming from the chimney (outside), but the draft is great. I've had, like, half a wisp escape into my house in four burns, and that was my fault. Thanks for the suggestions, All!
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
89,548
South Puget Sound, WA
How far down are you able to close down the air once the fire is burning well? Are you seeing good secondary combustion?
 

joshuaboston

Member
Jul 24, 2015
79
Boston
When I ran my insert 24/7 for a few days with my boiler off I would get a downdraft in the boiler chimney. Now I crack a window in the basement to provide some make up air and all is good

So, if you want a fire going a window needs to be open? That sounds like me, I need about two windows open to get the draft going up my fireplace.

I have contracted to put in a insert with a insulated liner and I am hoping this will solve my problem.

But, having a window open to me is not solving the problem.
 
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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
89,548
South Puget Sound, WA
So, if you want a fire going a window needs to be open? That sounds like me, I need about two windows open to get the draft going up my fireplace.
I have contracted to put in a insert with a insulated liner and I am hoping this will solve my problem.
But, having a window open to me is not solving the problem.
The insert may need an outside air supply to remedy this situation.
 
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Ashful

Minister of Fire
Mar 7, 2012
15,715
Philadelphia
“May,” begreen? Let’s not treat it too lightly, couldn’t such a situation be potentially dangerous for things like CO, if the window were closed without an OAK?
 

Hogwildz

Minister of Fire
Just picked up a very nice clean Nightingale 101 for short money.
For my basement insert. Wifey says
its not as pretty as our enamel Regency/Hampton upstairs. Came with nice glass. It was wrapped in a blanket and tucked away before the dolly was unloaded, I learned that lesson the hard way years ago.
View attachment 229606 View attachment 229607
That thing will have a serious hunger for wood.
 

Freep

New Member
Aug 26, 2018
9
Pacific Northwest, USA
How far down are you able to close down the air once the fire is burning well? Are you seeing good secondary combustion?

I'm still getting used to it, so it's hard to tell for sure. This is the first modern wood stove I've used, so I'm having to learn to use it properly.

Thus far, it seems not to like the air control being fully closed. I start out fully open, then spend most of my time at around 1/3 or 2/3 open. There's a big different between 2/3 and fully open: In terms of stove temp, it goes from 400-ish to over 600. It's been difficult for me to dial it in just right, so I tend to reduce it as far as I think I can, then have to open it back up because it dies down more than I bargained for. Again, though, I'm very new to the whole process. Also, temps are pretty mild currently so I can't really load up the stove fully without creating problems. Most of the fires are about 1/3 to 1/2 capacity of the fire box, at most.

The thing will heat, though. I am not sure how to tell if I am getting good secondary combustion.

I'm burning bigleaf maple almost exclusively at this point. I have a bunch of alder, but the maple is the only wood below 20% moisture. Most of it is from standing dead trees that I prepped over the summer.