Never used Atlanta Box 27

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Carolina kid

New Member
Nov 6, 2016
12
North Carolina
I bought a wood stove via Craigslist for $125.00. The guy I bought it from had bought it from an older couple for his manufactured home, but changed his mind after realizing that it would not be as easy as running a pipe through the roof.

My question is this. This stove has never been fired without a doubt. I have read some post saying the date is stamped on the bottom. Atlanta Stove Works closed up shop in the 70's. So I expected to see a 1970's date stamped on the bottom.

The date is 1934? How could a stove be around that long and never
be used? Anyway I working on installing it in my shop now and can't wait to use it.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
88,979
South Puget Sound, WA
It was a good call by that couple, there are strict rules for mobile home installations. Old stoves like this are not allowed.

This was a good American made box stove. Not the most efficient, but a good heater. Just be sure to install it safely and by the book. Not sure if 1934 is the date of mfg. or a casting part number. Often in cast iron stoves they will put the casting design date in the mold. If the design doesn't change, then all stoves made with that part will have the same date stamp, even if made decades later.
 

Carolina kid

New Member
Nov 6, 2016
12
North Carolina
Thanks for the feedback. I'm trying to be safe and go by the book on installation as much as possible and also a little common sense engineering.

As soon as I figure out how to put a pic on here I will send it. Lol. So much for common sense engineering.
 

Carolina kid

New Member
Nov 6, 2016
12
North Carolina
image.jpg
 
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Carolina kid

New Member
Nov 6, 2016
12
North Carolina
Ok, image is waiting moderator approval. The stove is going in the 16X24' lower level. The upper room is 12'X24'. So I have 24" next to the wall of open space going straight up into the attic area. I want to put it in the corner for space saving reasons. I am going to put 1/2" OSB over studs and then 1/2" Durock cement board over that. Then I have 4' wide textured and corrugated alum roofing material that I plan to use as a heat shield to cover the whole corner including the ceiling
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
88,979
South Puget Sound, WA
Even with a proper ventilated heat shield the closest that stove can be to combustibles is 12", otherwise it's 36". Single-wall stove pipe needs to be 18" from any combustible. Note that installing a woodstove in a garage is not legal in some jurisdictions. In others it is sometimes allowed but needs to be elevated 18". Check with the local inspecting authority.
 

Carolina kid

New Member
Nov 6, 2016
12
North Carolina
It is not an attached garage. I usually have a motorcycle, mower, and other power tools in there. But I move out the stuff and set up tables for family get togethers, oyster roast, parties, etc. I will be in code everywhere except the back corners of the stove. There I will have double heat shields.

I held a propane torch to the durock with my hand on the back side. It may have a low R value as far as insulation goes, but it surprises me how well it protects from heat. I put a piece of OSB behind a scrap piece of Durock and torched it at 3,000 degrees in an area 3" diameter until it glowed red hot on the Durock side. I could lay my hand on the face of the OSB behind the Durock. You put two layers of heat shield in front of that, It should be safer than a government gas can. I will test all wall surface temps beforehand and do whatever it takes to keep the walls cool.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
25,026
central pa
the problem is not intense heat for a short period of time it is moderate heat over long periods of time which dramatically lower the ignition point of the wood. You need to follow code it has been tested thoroughly.
 

Carolina kid

New Member
Nov 6, 2016
12
North Carolina
Yes, I understand. I rather go overkill, even if it means moving the heater further out from the corner.

What is the max surface temp. range that I should allow the Durock to attain? In my mind, I would like to keep it under 150* with a hot burn.
 

coaly

Fisher Moderator
Staff member
Dec 22, 2007
4,235
NE PA
It's not the temperature of heat shield that matters. It's the air space behind it and the transfer of heat from shield to wall. The opening under the shield at bottom for air intake is critical for rising air flow behind shield, and keeping the stove 12 inches from combustible. (measured to combustible, not shield)

There are 3 pieces that make up the bottom of your stove. The front piece is called Front Section Bottom and is part #1934.
The center section called Suction Center is part #1935. And the Rear Section Bottom is #1936.
Parts diagram; http://www.searspartsdirect.com/model-number/27/0076/0912300.html

Here's the best timeline for your stove manufacturer;
http://www.modemac.com/cgi-bin/wiki...aris/A_Timeline_of_Birmingham_Stove_and_Range
 

Carolina kid

New Member
Nov 6, 2016
12
North Carolina
Thanks so much for the info. I am counting the cement board as combustible material since it is touching the OSB. My heat sheild will be metal 2-3" bottom gap/ 1" from wall.
The question is can I do a double heat sheild in the corner only 4' tall and be safe with only a 7-8" clearance on the two back corners of the stove?
 

coaly

Fisher Moderator
Staff member
Dec 22, 2007
4,235
NE PA
The Standard used is NFPA 211 which has a section for unlisted appliances. It is actually 36 inches without shielding and allows a 66% reduction with an approved shield. (shield specifications also given in Standard) It states 12 inch minimum clearance as well. The Standard also gives clearance for connector pipe. (18 inches single wall) The Standard is not a code, state and local codes adopt the Standard making it a part of their codes. Reading that Standard will clear up a lot of confusion.
The size of shield is fabricated to prevent any part of the stove from being 36 inches from combustible as shown in diagrams below.

Wall Clearance Min. listed stoves.gif Wall Clearance Min. listed to shield.gif The shield also can't have support or stand off directly in the center of stove. Space your stand offs so the closest clearance from stove corner to shield doesn't have a stand off to transmit heat where the shield is hottest.

Does your stove have Phillips head screws to secure legs? I've seen straight slotted stove bolts on early stoves.
I have a new one as well in my collection. I coated the inside with boiled linseed oil to protect from rust. My handle isn't painted and yours looks longer. I'll measure to see if they are the same.
 

Carolina kid

New Member
Nov 6, 2016
12
North Carolina
The legs have a slot and has only one bolt/nut/washer to secure it in place. There is a small hole in the side that might could be used for a screw, but I don't know if the stove can accomadate it. I bought a box of firebricks from Tractor Supply and noticed the sides of the stove has a lip that seems to be made to hold bricks along the sides of the firebox. I wonder if I am supposed to place them on their sides or ends where they will cover more of the sidewalls?
 

Carolina kid

New Member
Nov 6, 2016
12
North Carolina
Oh, thanks for the info. I have been studying all the NFPA standards. This is a great sight. Looking forward to learning and sharing. In fact, before I ever signed up I got a lot of helpful info from this site popping up on web searches. Thanks
 

coaly

Fisher Moderator
Staff member
Dec 22, 2007
4,235
NE PA
Yes, each leg will have one fastener. I called it a screw because they are now referred to as machine screws. At one time they were called stove bolts getting their name from holding stove parts together. An old timer may let the old term slip. Stove bolts were course thread and usually had a straight slotted head, but could have Phillips after the early 30's. The hardware can be a way of dating it. Does it have a Phillips head or straight slot for a straight blade screwdriver?
There should be 3 machine screws in each side that hold the side plates together. One top, center and bottom. Countersunk head with a nut inside. The head type should match the leg hardware.
My handle is a shorter bent one, with a 90* bend in the middle numbered 158 instead of the straight #160. I knew something was different than your long handle pictured.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
88,979
South Puget Sound, WA
That should do it. Looks pretty cool too. Now be super safe with flammables in the garage.
 
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