New stove choice? CFM FW240007 to ???

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New Member
Nov 13, 2021
18
MO
I am going to have to replace my stove so I am unsure what direction to go. The small stove that I had did an okay job of heating, but it simply does not have a long enough burn time. I am at work for around 12 hours a day. Well I don't need to fire to come home too I don't want the house to have dropped to 55 which is where my thermostat is set to kick on the central heat. I do not like to be overly warm somewhere around 60 to 64 is good I simply spent too many hours outdoors to want to be too warm inside. The downstairs is 1300 square feet and the upstairs is generally shut off but it's another 680. The stove sits in the main room which is 32 by 15 or 17 I forget and then there's a hallway that goes to the rooms to which are generally shut off. The stairwell to go upstairs is on the opposite corner of the main room. I have been looking at the jewelry 1800 2100 and the ht3000. I would love to own something like a Vermont castings, but it's way out of my budget which needs to stay around or under two thousand.
 

ABMax24

Minister of Fire
Sep 18, 2019
1,327
Grande Prairie, Alberta, Canada
Depending on how your place is insulated I think the Drolet 2100 and 3000 are going to be on the large side. The 1800 would probably be the better fit, if you heat loss is minimal the 1500 or deco II may be a better fit yet. Drolet has increased pricing lately, but there are still some dealers selling their remaining inventory for the old prices, but I can still get an 1800 for $1400 while the msrp has gone up to $1700.

Other options to consider are:

True North TN20
Century Stove's (same guts as Drolet, built by SBI)

I'm sure others will chime in with more options.
 

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New Member
Nov 13, 2021
18
MO
Thank you for your opinion I appreciate it. I am hoping that several people do chime in. I thought the bigger stoves might be a little big, but it's the time I'm going to work that's concerned to me for having to rebuild. Hours so there might be something left when I got home. Plus, I've always had the upstairs shut off with the smaller stove and I would like to be able to open it up I may need to going forward have somebody live up there. Ask to insulation, the house is built in 2009 with 2x6 walls and blown insulation
 
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moresnow

Minister of Fire
Jan 13, 2015
1,922
Iowa
Being capable of relighting on residual coals after 12+ hours of being out of the house is going to require a substantially larger firebox than what you are currently using in a normal tube or perforated baffle style non-catalyst stove. As far as I know.

On the other hand you can get those long burn times easily with a small Catalyst equipped modern stove. Additionally your heat output can be regulated with a Cat stove to be very low and slow if that's all your home/climate requires. Food for thought.

The Cat equipped stoves will require a few additional nickels be rubbed together for purchase compared to what you want to spend. Blaze King and Woodstock are Catalyst stove manufacturers with long term success.

Where are you at in MO? Such a cool state with a nice climate and interesting territory. Finding firewood should not be a issue from what I've seen in my travels down that way!
 
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New Member
Nov 13, 2021
18
MO
Right I would be fine if it doesn't necessarily have to have coals when I get home as long as the house temperature would still be above the 55 degrees where the thermostat kicks on. That is why I have considered the escape 1800s or 2100 of course the alternative to the 2100 is the ht3000.
I live in Southwest Missouri just outside of Joplin. No there's no shortage of firewood in fact I had over a hundred year old tree that was 8 ft around at shoulder heights that died this year. I'm cutting it for next winter. It is a shame when such a nice old tree dies, but it does make good firewood it was a big old oak.
 
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ABMax24

Minister of Fire
Sep 18, 2019
1,327
Grande Prairie, Alberta, Canada
Fwiw my Osburn is the same firebox as the Drolet 1800, and I'm heating 2300sqft with it. That being said on really cold days the furnace is running by time I get home 11 hrs later, be it my climate is much colder. 12 hrs burns in this firebox aren't really possible.

Another option might be the Austral III, on paper it has a lower burn rate than the 2100 and a little bit smaller firebox, but larger than the 1800. There's at least one thread on this firebox, Osburn 3300, same firebox just different exterior.
 

moresnow

Minister of Fire
Jan 13, 2015
1,922
Iowa
Right I would be fine if it doesn't necessarily have to have coals when I get home as long as the house temperature would still be above the 55 degrees where the thermostat kicks on. That is why I have considered the escape 1800s or 2100 of course the alternative to the 2100 is the ht3000.
I live in Southwest Missouri just outside of Joplin. No there's no shortage of firewood in fact I had over a hundred year old tree that was 8 ft around at shoulder heights that died this year. I'm cutting it for next winter. It is a shame when such a nice old tree dies, but it does make good firewood it was a big old oak.
I'd plan on letting that Oak sit for at least 2 full years to season at my place. This is after I get it split and stacked where it can get sun and wind. Being dead when you cut it down and split it means next to zero as it will in all likelihood still be very, very wet . Do some deep research on properly seasoning firewood. All new stove models require well seasoned wood to perform well. Trying to run one on wet wood will simply not work and you will be back here asking why. Also. Purchase a moisture meter and get handy with it. Just a gentle suggestion! Carry on.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
91,415
South Puget Sound, WA
Suggestions already made in the previous thread.
 

Triple Share

New Member
Nov 13, 2021
18
MO
I'd plan on letting that Oak sit for at least 2 full years to season at my place. This is after I get it split and stacked where it can get sun and wind. Being dead when you cut it down and split it means next to zero as it will in all likelihood still be very, very wet . Do some deep research on properly seasoning firewood. All new stove models require well seasoned wood to perform well. Trying to run one on wet wood will simply not work and you will be back here asking why. Also. Purchase a moisture meter and get handy with it. Just a gentle suggestion! Carry on.
Yes, that would will definitely sit but it will be used next year starting anyway I generally cut enough for like 3 years so the wood I'm burning this winter is from three seasons ago. The shortest lime then of course will be from now till next fall.
 

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New Member
Nov 13, 2021
18
MO
I looked at the true north, but I think that one's actually a little small and the burn time is not long enough. The 1800 escape has an 8 hour burn time at 2.4 box I'm leaning towards that but part of me would rather have the bigger box the three four that comes with some of the other models they do, but I'm not sure it just wouldn't be too hot for when I am home.