Newbee requesting wood stove advice

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SmokeNo

New Member
Dec 18, 2021
6
Alberta
Hello all, new to the forum. I have an old (1975ish) wood burning fireplace with a masonry chimney and metal fire box (Northern Heatliner IIRC). I am contemplating upgrading it to something more heat efficient and have looked at both wood inserts and wood stoves.

The main issue with the insert route as I see it is that the fire box has heat recovery tubes at the top of the box, just below the damper (to bring in fresh outside air, heat it and expel it into the room). As far as I can determine, at least one of these tubes would have to be removed to make clearance for the chimney liner that would be attached to the insert As such an alteration would appear to be not permitted because the fireplace has to remain intact except for removal of the damper and outside trim etc., it looks like an insert would not be an option(?).

That leaves the wood stove (which I kinda like anyhow). The only suitable location for it would be in front of the existing fireplace so I'm thinking of:

. removing the inside facia (which is BC Ledgestone in a dry-pack install)
. removing the raised hearth (also made of the same stone)
. covering the remaining hearth poured concrete substrate with tile or something
. covering the vertical exposed section with something non-combustible and decorative (cement board & tile?).
. running the flue straight up through the (cathedral) ceiling, so it exits the roof about one foot in from the existing chimney

Never having done anything like this before, I would appreciate any suggestion or comments on the feasibility of doing this and any advice on how best to proceed.

BTW, I kind of like the Englander 32-NC wood stove sold by Home Depot Canada:

https://www.homedepot.ca/product/en...stove-for-up-to-2-400-sq-ft-spaces/1001564529

Any comments on that choice would also be appreciated.

TIA for any help. :)
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
96,475
South Puget Sound, WA
That is an unfamiliar product. Can you post a picture? It sounds like it might be a heatform style fireplace which often were configured as a metal cabinet, surrounded by masonry with a masonry chimney. If so, this may be possible, however, make sure there is enough height for the stove first.
 

SmokeNo

New Member
Dec 18, 2021
6
Alberta
That is an unfamiliar product. Can you post a picture? It sounds like it might be a heatform style fireplace which often were configured as a metal cabinet, surrounded by masonry with a masonry chimney. If so, this may be possible, however, make sure there is enough height for the stove first.
Unfortunately don't have a picture but you are correct, it is a metal cabinet surrounded by masonry (cement block with stone facia) and a (12" square) masonry chimney. It's big enough for an insert but there is no way to thread a flex chimney liner around the heat pipes so one or more would have to be cut out.

I'm thinking I will go with just removing the facia & hearth, walling the internals off and installing a stove as described previously.

I would also like to run a flex pipe through the new facia to connect with the existing ash cleanout to provide outside combustion air. I believe the Englander 32-NC facilitates that.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
96,475
South Puget Sound, WA
It's not untypical to need to cut the center heat pipe(s) in order to run the liner.