Not entirely new to running a woodstove but definately new to installing one - question about stove pipes:

  • Active since 1995, Hearth.com is THE place on the internet for free information and advice about wood stoves, pellet stoves and other energy saving equipment.

    We strive to provide opinions, articles, discussions and history related to Hearth Products and in a more general sense, energy issues.

    We promote the EFFICIENT, RESPONSIBLE, CLEAN and SAFE use of all fuels, whether renewable or fossil.

PineCityGardner

New Member
Sep 27, 2021
8
Upstate NY
We are installing a Jotul 602 v2 in our basement (small house). In order to improve the draft, we're thinking about using a double wall stove pipe and elbow to connect the stove going up and through the thimble to the chimney. My question is: can we connect a single wall pipe from the elbow going through the thimble to the chimney? Or, is it best practice to stay with double wall for all of our stove pipe sections? Thanks kindly for any info. I've been reading till my head is spinning and can't figure this one out.
 

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
1,930
Long Island NY
Double wall is best. Keeps flue gases hotter (less creosote condensation), and has reduced clearances.

Is your chimney a class A or a masonry that is lined with an insulated liner? Diameter?
 

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
1,930
Long Island NY
No, that won't fit.

Also, are you sure the masonry chimney has enough clearance to combustibles? Many do not. An insulated liner will reduce clearance requirements (easier to get it to code, and make it safer), improve draft, be easier to clean etc etc.
 

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
1,930
Long Island NY
You may be able to get connecting pieces for double wall to single wall thru thimble, and then back to insulated liner.

I hope @bholler will chime in. He is the expert here on flue stacks.
 
  • Like
Reactions: PineCityGardner

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
26,116
central pa
We have a chimney with no liner. The thimble opening is 6.25" diameter. Will a 6" double wall pipe fit through the thimble? Thanks!
Sorry masonry with no liner.
No double wall won't fit through the thimble. And you need a liner of some sort.

If you are using double wall it needs to be all double wall until it meets the thimble
 
  • Like
Reactions: PineCityGardner

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
1,930
Long Island NY
On another issue: do you have dry wood? Bought "seasoned" wood rarely is dry enough. Dry as in below 20% moisture content.

This will burn much better, will keep your chimney (and the outside air) cleaner, AND you'll not waste a lot of the energy of the wood to boil off all that water.
 
  • Like
Reactions: PineCityGardner

PineCityGardner

New Member
Sep 27, 2021
8
Upstate NY
Our masonry chimney is 17' high and stands 6" apart from the side of the house. It has a clay flue liner. We'll look into that. Thanks so much for answer about the double wall pipe. Lacking confidence but learning a lot.
 

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
1,930
Long Island NY
Check the requirements for the jotul; most modern stoves need 15' of flue stack to function properly. But with horizontal runs and 90 deg elbows, you have to add length to that 15'. So I think you'll already be below what the stove needs and may have to extend your chimney. I don't know your stove though, so check the manual.
 

PineCityGardner

New Member
Sep 27, 2021
8
Upstate NY
It's been hard to keep wood dry this summer, my goodness! We have it stacked properly and have a routine of filling the next burn inside in a rack near the wood stove. I'm glad to know the percentage of moisture. Thanks!
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
26,116
central pa
Our masonry chimney is 17' high and stands 6" apart from the side of the house. It has a clay flue liner. We'll look into that. Thanks so much for answer about the double wall pipe. Lacking confidence but learning a lot.
Ok so it is lined. If it's 6" away and the clay is in good shape it could be used like that as long as the size is correct
 
  • Like
Reactions: stoveliker

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
1,930
Long Island NY
It's been hard to keep wood dry this summer, my goodness! We have it stacked properly and have a routine of filling the next burn inside in a rack near the wood stove. I'm glad to know the percentage of moisture. Thanks!

Yes! Humid weather this year.

Most hardwood needs two years of stacking (split) under cover to be dry enough.
Oak may need three years.

So it is advisable to get going on collecting wood, splitting, stacking, and covering now so you'll have good wood two years out.
 
  • Like
Reactions: PineCityGardner

PineCityGardner

New Member
Sep 27, 2021
8
Upstate NY
Thanks for this great info! We have staggered years of fire wood. We were burning an old and inefficient stove and now going to install this new stove. So we've been running a wood stove at our house for 4+ years.
 
  • Like
Reactions: stoveliker

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
1,930
Long Island NY
Just one more note: modern stoves are quite a bit more fussy in draft requirements and wood dryness than old (PRE-EPA) stoves. So if your old stove worked well on this flue system, that does not automatically translate to a new one doing well.