Old Home with Existing Stove (blaze king) into Masonry Chimney

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wgovus

New Member
Dec 4, 2021
4
Methow Valley
I recently acquired an old home with an obviously sketchy situation that I would very much like to to mediate if possible.

To preface: I have searched and read this: https://www.hearth.com/talk/threads/chimney-passing-a-chimney-through-the-wall.147754/

Currently the home was being used with an old Blaze King princess that was piped into a masonry chimney with a terra cotta flu. The flu is in okay shape and was cleaned recently. The attached photos show it all, but the single wall black pipe runs horizontally 23" through a collar attaching to dry wall right next to old dried out framing directly into the masonry chimney. Somehow the previous occupant ran this setup for decades without burning down their home?

I was wondering what the most cost effective way of making this safe could be (if any). The biggest caveat is I do fortunately(?) live somewhere (Methow Valley, WA) that provides a free woodstove exchange/installation/upgrade program to modern EPA stoves if you do have an older one. However, I may have to wait any number of months for this to potentially happen. As I am a low income human, I cannot throw a large sum of money at this situation knowing that I will eventually receive assistance.

SO: Is there any way to conceivably make this setup safe? What would be the simplest? A simple NO would work as well and I could bite the bullet.

Thanks for any information!

IMG_5917.jpeg IMG_5918.jpeg IMG_5919.jpeg
 
Last edited by a moderator:

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
93,868
South Puget Sound, WA
The safe way is to use an insulated thimble as mentioned in the passing through the wall article.

A new stove could require a 6" stainless liner in the chimney so that it drafts properly. What shape is the current chimney in? Does it have a clay liner in good condition? If so, what is that liner's inside dimensions? How tall is the chimney?
 

wgovus

New Member
Dec 4, 2021
4
Methow Valley
The clay liner was inspected and they claimed it was in useable condition. It has a 7"x7" inside dimension (8x8 outer) so would likely need to be removed to install a 6x6 stainless liner? I was hoping to wait to do that until I get a new stove and just use this one for this winter if possible.

I'm having a hard time sourcing an insulated thimble that would work for this setup - any advice?
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
93,868
South Puget Sound, WA
This is typically what is used.
Here are the items mentioned in the article:

 

wgovus

New Member
Dec 4, 2021
4
Methow Valley
Thanks!

Pardon my ignorance and confusion - the entrance into the masonry chimney and the black stove pipe is 6" . If I was one of the first two options linked in the 6" size they would mate fine and create a safer situation?
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
93,868
South Puget Sound, WA

BKVP

Minister of Fire
And that model is pre EPA KTJ. The stack gas temps are much higher than modern models.

If you can participate in a changeout, you can potentially apply any out of pockets costs using the 25D Tax credit.

Save all your receipts for future accounting needs.
 

BKVP

Minister of Fire
In addition to the insulated thimble, consider transitioning to black double wall and 2 45's. Again, save your receipts.

BKVP