Osburn 3500 vs. Regency CI2700 Inserts

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BillyMack

New Member
Sep 12, 2021
1
Michigan
Hey Gang!

Long time lurker, first time poster ready to pull the trigger and am down to two units:

Osburn 3500
vs.
Regency CI2700

I'm in a 2100sqft ranch in Michigan, well-insulated open concept, and looking to heat 24/7. We have a fairly efficient (82,000 BTU) forced-air natural gas furnace which we realize we'd probably need in the coldest part of the winter and possibly in the early morning as we get a fresh burn going. Planning to do the install ourselves. 16' from floor of fireplace to top of exterior flue. Fireplace is in the middle of the house (no exterior walls).

I can't seem to find too many user reviews on the Osburn, which is the model I'm leaning toward. I realize it doesn't qualify for the Tax Credit. Could you let me know if you have any opinions on this breakdown:

Osburn:
Bigger firebox (3.5 vs 2.6)
Square firebox (vs. Regency's tapered box)
Projects into stove room
Higher BTU output
Easier to operate
A bit more forgiving with wood moisture content
Cost is lower, even with credits

Regency:
Higher efficiency
Higher aesthetic appearance
Can burn lower, longer at the expense of blackened glass

What am I overlooking or wrong about?
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
26,116
central pa
Hey Gang!

Long time lurker, first time poster ready to pull the trigger and am down to two units:

Osburn 3500
vs.
Regency CI2700

I'm in a 2100sqft ranch in Michigan, well-insulated open concept, and looking to heat 24/7. We have a fairly efficient (82,000 BTU) forced-air natural gas furnace which we realize we'd probably need in the coldest part of the winter and possibly in the early morning as we get a fresh burn going. Planning to do the install ourselves. 16' from floor of fireplace to top of exterior flue. Fireplace is in the middle of the house (no exterior walls).

I can't seem to find too many user reviews on the Osburn, which is the model I'm leaning toward. I realize it doesn't qualify for the Tax Credit. Could you let me know if you have any opinions on this breakdown:

Osburn:
Bigger firebox (3.5 vs 2.6)
Square firebox (vs. Regency's tapered box)
Projects into stove room
Higher BTU output
Easier to operate
A bit more forgiving with wood moisture content
Cost is lower, even with credits

Regency:
Higher efficiency
Higher aesthetic appearance
Can burn lower, longer at the expense of blackened glass

What am I overlooking or wrong about?
Just a couple things. I don't think the osburn will be any easier to operate really. The only difference in operation will be closing the bypass when you start to shut the air back so an extra second or 2.

And I don't think it would be any more forgiving as far as moisture content.

When it comes to cost don't forget that the tax credit also applies to the liner and install.

I am sure either would work fine and the osburn being a bit bigger more square and projecting into the room will give it a bit of an advantage in many ways
 

mightytitan9

New Member
Sep 18, 2021
29
Mound City KS
I loved my Osburn 2400, It's been discontinued and I believe the 3500 is the replacement. I wouldn't hesitate to buy the Osburn 3500. I am currently in the market for an insert and am really disappointed the 3500 is too large for my opening.
 

Bethany Waterfall

New Member
Oct 28, 2021
22
schoharie, NY
Hey Gang!

Long time lurker, first time poster ready to pull the trigger and am down to two units:

Osburn 3500
vs.
Regency CI2700

I'm in a 2100sqft ranch in Michigan, well-insulated open concept, and looking to heat 24/7. We have a fairly efficient (82,000 BTU) forced-air natural gas furnace which we realize we'd probably need in the coldest part of the winter and possibly in the early morning as we get a fresh burn going. Planning to do the install ourselves. 16' from floor of fireplace to top of exterior flue. Fireplace is in the middle of the house (no exterior walls).

I can't seem to find too many user reviews on the Osburn, which is the model I'm leaning toward. I realize it doesn't qualify for the Tax Credit. Could you let me know if you have any opinions on this breakdown:

Osburn:
Bigger firebox (3.5 vs 2.6)
Square firebox (vs. Regency's tapered box)
Projects into stove room
Higher BTU output
Easier to operate
A bit more forgiving with wood moisture content
Cost is lower, even with credits

Regency:
Higher efficiency
Higher aesthetic appearance
Can burn lower, longer at the expense of blackened glass

What am I overlooking or wrong about?
Hi Billy Mack. I am looking at the Osburn 3300 and 3500. Why doesn't the 3500 qualify for the tax credits? I thought it did. I am also having a similar problem finding reviews and comparisons. I can't really figure out what the major differences are and if it's worth it to get the 3500? For an increase in the firebox from 3.2 to 3.5?