Pole Barn Chimney Location

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NoPaint

Feeling the Heat
Jan 2, 2009
269
USA
Folks I have a weird question. I want to put my Vigilant stove in my pole barn and I need to locate my chimney. I would like to keep the stove by the eave but then I have 2 questions. 1. how high above the roof line does the chimney have to go if I have a 6:12 pitch. 2. will ice slide down and try to rip off my chimney...and if so should I put ice catchers on the roof from the chimney up to the ridge?
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
93,171
South Puget Sound, WA
The stove will do the best job if located more toward the center of the building. The chimney height will be determined by the 10-3-2 rule.
10-3-2 rule.JPG
 

NoPaint

Feeling the Heat
Jan 2, 2009
269
USA
Thanks. I was worried it would have to be central haha. I realize it won't be optimal against a wall but I am just hoping it won't be useless. Central is going to be tough in this barn. The left side of the diagram that you show is pretty much how its gonna have to be. I will have to measure for the 10-3-2 unless there is an online formula using roof pitch.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
93,171
South Puget Sound, WA
Thanks. I was worried it would have to be central haha. I realize it won't be optimal against a wall but I am just hoping it won't be useless. Central is going to be tough in this barn. The left side of the diagram that you show is pretty much how its gonna have to be. I will have to measure for the 10-3-2 unless there is an online formula using roof pitch.
When you price things out you will find that chimney pipe is much more expensive than stove pipe. If the interior run of stove pipe is greater than 8ft. the use of double-wall stove pipe is strongly recommended.
 

NoPaint

Feeling the Heat
Jan 2, 2009
269
USA
So according to my calculations I am looking at 84 inches of pipe over the roof (YUCK!). Inside should be around 8 feet. Can you explain why it would be better to do double wall if the inside pipe is longer than 8 feet? One source mentioned keeping maximum single wall inside so it radiates more heat but also that seems excessive.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
93,171
South Puget Sound, WA
So according to my calculations I am looking at 84 inches of pipe over the roof (YUCK!). Inside should be around 8 feet. Can you explain why it would be better to do double wall if the inside pipe is longer than 8 feet? One source mentioned keeping maximum single wall inside so it radiates more heat but also that seems excessive.
We have about that much chimney pipe above our roof. The chimney needs to be braced at 60" above the roofline.
Stove-Install-012-web.jpg

The stove is meant to be the source of heat, not the stove pipe. Heat loss from single-wall stove pipe is significant. If the flue gases cool down too much then creosote will start condensing once they hit the cooler exterior chimney pipe. You don't want that. Also, double-wall stove pipe has superior construction. The inner liner is stainless which has a much longer life than single-wall.