Question about Thelin Thompson Gnome older wood stove

  • Active since 1995, Hearth.com is THE place on the internet for free information and advice about wood stoves, pellet stoves and other energy saving equipment.

    We strive to provide opinions, articles, discussions and history related to Hearth Products and in a more general sense, energy issues.

    We promote the EFFICIENT, RESPONSIBLE, CLEAN and SAFE use of all fuels, whether renewable or fossil.

Blazzinghot

Member
Dec 5, 2019
153
New Plymouth, Idaho
I have been keeping an eye out for another stove to rebuild but while snooping around I found this Thelin Thompson Gnome Stove. I am not going to buy it but was wondering what the big U shaped cast iron thing is inside the stove? These pictures came from Craigslist so hope it OK to attach them. And I hope I posted this in the right location on this forum. Thanks

Thelin Thompson Nome Inside.jpg Thelin top view .jpg
 

Blazzinghot

Member
Dec 5, 2019
153
New Plymouth, Idaho
Well I was hoping that someone understood how this stove works. Here is a picture of the whole stove which might help jog someone's memory. I am always interested in how things work on these older wood stoves. I have even emailed the company to see if anyone there knows how this stove works. But so far no reply.
 

Attachments

  • Thelin Thompson Nome Stove .jpg
    Thelin Thompson Nome Stove .jpg
    78.9 KB · Views: 39

Blazzinghot

Member
Dec 5, 2019
153
New Plymouth, Idaho
Hi I finally got a reply from the company about this stove. I sent them pictures same as on this site. He stated that this was a very old model and the item I was referring to is called a "heat exchange tube" but offered no further information. I have emailed them twice since and will update this when I find out. Perhaps some of you stove people understand what a heat exchange tube does? But if not I will wait.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
89,681
South Puget Sound, WA
Is there an opening underneath it or on the outside of it that a convective blower could attach to?
 

Blazzinghot

Member
Dec 5, 2019
153
New Plymouth, Idaho
Hi begreen, this is a good question. I wished I could have seen this stove in real life as I would have like to see how it was built and operates. But as you point out a heat exchange usually has a blower fan.
 

David O

New Member
Oct 15, 2021
2
Sacramento
Well, I, too, recently acquired a similar Gnome stove, circa 1983. The stove is in great shape, and I have polished up the chrome parts and replaced some bolts holding on the glass panels on the front door.

When I moved to my current location in 1981, I listed after one of the larger stoves that Thelin made at the time.
However, wifey prevailed, and we got a large masonry round stove made by a lady named Renaja Soleil.

It has been an excellent stove. But has deteriorated, with cracks in the casing: and it is no longer airtight.

Thus I went looking for a stove after which I used to pine, only to get a reflection that they ain't the stoves they used to be. , I was happy to find this early Gnome wood burning stove, (not a pellet stove,.) Only 150 miles away.

The stove is arranged in such a way as to allow a water coupling to be attached to the back so that it can be a source of hot water for both the radiating Mass that develops, or simply for domestic hot water. I believe the two parallel 3-in (approximately ) vertical cylinders towards the rear of the unit are the heating Chambers for the hot water, which can thermosiphon out of the unit by virtue of the two pipe nipple extensions on the back of the stove.
, Into a remote storage tank.

My stove has a damper mounted on the bottom, which can be manually or electric electrically operated if hooked up to a remote thermostat.

All of this verbiage precedes the question relating to why I've signed up here:

"Does this early 1983 Thelin Thompson Gnome wood burning stove require fire brick to be placed in the bottom and surrounds"?

Does anyone have an owner's manual for this model or similar stove?

Thank you for any response you may have and thank you for the internet which allows such transactions to occur.

Peace, out!
I
 

Blazzinghot

Member
Dec 5, 2019
153
New Plymouth, Idaho
DavidO, is seems that this is not a common stove and from reading this thread you can see that most are not familiar with it, Or some who are have not seen this post. I searched the internet diligently and could not find much info on these older stoves. You can still contact the company and they might be able to help you out. They helped me the best the could with my questions.

I am not sure what you are referring to about the fire brick but my guess would be they put it there for a reason. Just like with most stoves the fire brick is to protect the metal from over heating and cracking and warping.
 

David O

New Member
Oct 15, 2021
2
Sacramento
DavidO, is seems that this is not a common stove and from reading this thread you can see that most are not familiar with it, Or some who are have not seen this post. I searched the internet diligently and could not find much info on these older stoves. You can still contact the company and they might be able to help you out. They helped me the best the could with my questions.

I am not sure what you are referring to about the fire brick but my guess would be they put it there for a reason. Just like with most stoves the fire brick is to protect the metal from over heating and cracking and warping.
I've not found the Thelin Company to be responsive, so I'll say what I think may be the answer.

In your opening post, the first picture shows what appears to be an accumulation of ash around the base of the "U" shaped tube (which provides pre-warmed air to the TOP of the burning wood..), which my stove also had developed. In cleaning it out, I soon realized that it wasn't "ash", but concrete or ceramic cement with aggregate.

I surmise that the whole bottom may have been covered to that thickness of ceramic cement, supplanting the usual firebrick, (which then fractured over time and was removed..)
or, (more likely I'm thinkin') was used merely to stabilize the air duct against
the frequent battering of wood being added to the firebox.

Whatever the answer is, until it is nailed down, I will use the red lava rock in a thick layer before laying in a fire.

Regards,
D
 

Blazzinghot

Member
Dec 5, 2019
153
New Plymouth, Idaho
David O, Thanks for sharing this information with me. Your surmising may be correct as the hot coals from the wood should not sit right on the metal on the bottom of the wood stove. I like the looks of these stoves. Hope it servers you well.