Replacing Prefab with Freestanding Stove - Basics

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
82,725
South Puget Sound, WA
Click that link in my signature line.. It doesn't contain a lot of discussion or description since the great photobucket debacle.. But might give you some ideas on how to get to where you want to be..
That thread was nicely documented. Can you PM me with a link to the original thread where you detailed the construction. I will try to restore some of the images.
 

BKVP

Minister of Fire
When we test wood stoves, we also test floor temps in addition to clearances such as walls and mantels.

If floor temps a high enough, the hearth pad or hearth materials will be subjected to a minimum R-value.

When temps are not too high, ember protection is all that is needed.

All manufacturers list hearth pad requirements at "x" R-Value or ember protection only.

BKVP
 
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Dakotas Dad

Minister of Fire
Mar 19, 2009
1,501
Central Kentucky
That thread was nicely documented. Can you PM me with a link to the original thread where you detailed the construction. I will try to restore some of the images.
I do not seem to be able to find the thread.. I think maybe it was external to Hearth, a couple of my camper mods threads died the same way.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
82,725
South Puget Sound, WA
I do not seem to be able to find the thread.. I think maybe it was external to Hearth, a couple of my camper mods threads died the same way.
Yes, I couldn't find it either. That is the trouble with external dependencies. If you have the time it would be great to select some of the key steps and do a write up so that it is here for others to learn from in the future. We have some new neighbors that want to try something like this. If you don't have time, I could give it a shot with your permission.
 

Poindexter

Minister of Fire
Jun 28, 2014
2,182
Fairbanks, Alaska
All wood stoves require "ember protection" for the hearth surface, eg something that won't catch on fire. Ceramic tile is fine if it fits your design aesthetic. Some stoves, especially older designs require some amount of R value for the hearth to protect the floor joists and subfloor (commonly of wood) from the heat pumping out the bottom of the stove.

So for vintage stoves you would need a non combustible surface - like ceramic tile or brick and etc- and some insulation to make R= x. IIRC my previous stove required R 4.2 so I built something like R4.5 or so with off the shelf components and then tiled the top surface. I am pretty sure I used two layers of micore and two layers of hardiboard with ceramic tile on top of that.

I can't think of a good reason to leave ornamental brickwork on my roof. I get that you have your hands full with this project and totally respect that problem, been there done that. But if you are going to run class A metal end to end the brick on the roof is unnecessary weight on your trusses or rafters that will eventually shorten the life of your shingles. Also- check your install guidelines for the product you choose - on the Class A chimney I bought I am not allowed to have combustibles within I think 24" of the vertical pipe, unless I buy a stack of boxes like the ceiling shield.

Your wife might very well like the ornamental brick work on the roof enough for you to build new framing that meets clearances on the Class A to support all the weigh of the ornamental brickwork. I have been there done that too, smiley.

Someday I will go up in the attic space with some pieces of micore and a screw gun to make a box around the chimney and even out the lie of my blown in cellulose. It isn't a super high priority for me. But if I had to frame up a new support for ornamental brick work that was 24" away from my class A it would, in the end, be a lot less work to demo the ornamental chimney.

You are putting a lot of effort into research here. You are going to be happy with your install I think, because you are working hard to understand the "why" behind all of the decisions.

Also, it might make sense to demo the existing fireplace back to studs and see what stoves you can install with no elbows in the pipe. Up here going up on the roof midwinter to sweep my own chimney top down is simply not an option. I have to lift the telescope off the stove and sweep bottom up, or shutdown the stove until I can get on the roof safely in June.

I just noticed there is page two to this thread I haven't read yet...

If you are replacing the flooring anyway, my next hearth is going to have a lot more room in front of the stove. I have 18" from the lip of the door to the edge of the hearth now, but it isn't quite enough for my wife to spread out a beach towel and put on a summer outfit while reclining on the hearth in front of the stove. I will very likely go up to 30" on the next hearth I build. I do have burns in the carpet from popping spruce embers 22" out from the door lip.
 

jjmac1235

New Member
Nov 28, 2018
47
Upstate NY
Thanks for your post Dexter. I don’t have a lot of experience with roof work. The whole roof was reshingled last year. It’s a brand new roof. I really don’t want to go up there and demo the ornamental brick chase and have to shingle and match roof etc.

I just assume use the existing chase and run my new class a through it. My understanding is that New class a pipe only requires 2” clearance to combustibles. Which allows me to use all the framing that is already there. Should be as easy as putting in a ceiling support and insulation shield and running it up through existing chase in attic and roof.

hopefully I am not missing anything...
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
21,492
central pa
Thanks for your post Dexter. I don’t have a lot of experience with roof work. The whole roof was reshingled last year. It’s a brand new roof. I really don’t want to go up there and demo the ornamental brick chase and have to shingle and match roof etc.

I just assume use the existing chase and run my new class a through it. My understanding is that New class a pipe only requires 2” clearance to combustibles. Which allows me to use all the framing that is already there. Should be as easy as putting in a ceiling support and insulation shield and running it up through existing chase in attic and roof.

hopefully I am not missing anything...
Actually now would be the perfect time to patch in shingles when you can buy the same shingle easily and your shingles aren't faded or discolored.

But if the chase is in good shape and properly supported no need to change it.
 
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