Seasoning wood dead vs live?

Grizzerbear

Feeling the Heat
Feb 12, 2019
323
SW Missoura
If its only at 35% i would say two full summers at least. I dont believe it will be sub 20% by next year anyways without solar kiln. Oak takes a long time to dry. Normally a live tree in my experience takes longest. That being said i have cut a many a standing dead oak that was just as wet as live in the trunk/main branches. If it has been standing dead for some time maybe the limb wood.....say 8 inches and under could b dry enough right now and next year if you are having wood shortage.
 

showrguy

Feeling the Heat
Aug 2, 2015
425
Marysville, Pa.
I cut a standing dead red oak last Dec. that pegged my meter over 45%, split and stacked under roof in a single row, this fall it checked out at 17%...
that tree was dead 5 years or more, 2018 spring, summer, fall was the wettest we had in history, nothing dried..
 

Woodsplitter67

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2017
1,143
Woolwich nj
Does it take longer to season live trees cut down?
Since im only cutting dead firewood how long to season? Oak? Testing at about 35%mc
you may be close to being able to burn it if its been cut and stacked already but its NOT going to be sub 20 mc in 9 months.. its still going to be a little wet.. your going to need to do 1 of 2 things.. wait 2 summers or if you cant ...do a kiln this summer and it will be plenty dry
 
  • Like
Reactions: Indiana wood

hickoryhoarder

Feeling the Heat
Apr 5, 2013
351
Indiana
Dead should be ready sooner than a live tree, but 35% is high. Next winter could be overly optimistic.
 

hickoryhoarder

Feeling the Heat
Apr 5, 2013
351
Indiana
How long does it take you to season your hickory?
Despite how dense it is, hickory usually is ready for me in 9 to 15 months. Longer is even better, but hickory can also deteriorate quicker than other stuff (if in the rain), so I try to get through it by the third year it's at my house.
 

Woodsplitter67

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2017
1,143
Woolwich nj
Despite how dense it is, hickory usually is ready for me in 9 to 15 months. Longer is even better, but hickory can also deteriorate quicker than other stuff (if in the rain), so I try to get through it by the third year it's at my house.
i get alot of powder-post beetles
 
  • Like
Reactions: Tar12

Grizzerbear

Feeling the Heat
Feb 12, 2019
323
SW Missoura
I get a lot of flatheaded borers when i split hickory.....usually under the bark. But yea hickory seems to season in about a year for me as well. Almost makes it better than oak except its a devil to handsplit.....most times.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Indiana wood

Woody Stover

Minister of Fire
Dec 25, 2010
11,450
Southern IN
I cut a standing dead red oak last Dec. that pegged my meter over 45%, split and stacked under roof in a single row, this fall it checked out at 17%...
that tree was dead 5 years or more, 2018 spring, summer, fall was the wettest we had in history, nothing dried..
Wow, how is that possible...are you located in a windy mountain pass? ==c
I've got some dead-standing White Ash that I stacked a few months back. It metered 30% or more when I cut it, but I was hoping it was some kind of 'different, faster-drying' moisture, since the tree stood dead for several years.
I went over there yesterday to put some metal roofing on that three-cord stack, and ended up splitting a few to level the top of the stack. I didn't meter it but it seemed pretty wet still.
I'm kind of kicking myself for splitting it so big, but I saw that recommended for secondary-burn stoves. It's stacked three rows together, on pallets. If it doesn't dry by fall, I'll have to get some other dry wood somewhere..either small, dead stuff out of the woods, or give them some from my stash, which I hate to do.
 

trail guy Mike

New Member
Jun 23, 2019
18
the mts of western NC
If you cut a live tree in summer, leave it lying intact until the leaves have all dried up. The green leaves will suck a lot of the moisture out of the wood. Then cut it up.
So I have heard.
 
  • Like
Reactions: StudlyHogly

Woodsplitter67

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2017
1,143
Woolwich nj
Seems like beetle and carpenter ants really make it punky quick
not really.. i get powder post beetle mostly on the hickory.. my wood sits in 3 wood sheds so no water gets on my stacks.. i get snakes and mice.. no ants.. ants are a sign of a wood storage problem
 

maple1

Minister of Fire
Sep 15, 2011
10,257
Nova Scotia
Can't be sure it isn't my imagination, but I seem to notice that wood processed from green trees has more heat in it than wood processed from trees that have been dead a while. All things else being equal and dried the same. Some kind of internal degradation?
 

Woodsplitter67

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2017
1,143
Woolwich nj
Can't be sure it isn't my imagination, but I seem to notice that wood processed from green trees has more heat in it than wood processed from trees that have been dead a while. All things else being equal and dried the same. Some kind of internal degradation?
i agree.. sometimes wood that sits loses its power
 

Sawset

Minister of Fire
Feb 14, 2015
730
Palmyra, WI
Can't be sure it isn't my imagination, but I seem to notice that wood processed from green trees has more heat in it than wood processed from trees that have been dead a while. All things else being equal and dried the same. Some kind of internal degradation?
Another reason to get wood below 20% as quick as possible. Above that fungus can thrive and promote "dry rot". Maybe not a lot, but other times, like with elm, makes it soft and useless.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Indiana wood