steel combustion package for resolute acclaim 2490

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mac2

New Member
Oct 11, 2021
13
toccoa ga
The combustion package on my Resolute acclaim 2490 is deterioated and needs to be replaced. I can fabricate one from plate steel that will replicate the original with all of the needed holes and dimensions. I have been told that the combustion packages function is to channel the air flow in the proper direction and that what I am looking to do will work. I have also asked several stove dealers in the area and they will not voice an opinion and I can understand they are concerned about liability.
What I am looking for is to find out if what I am proposing to is ok , or if it is just plain not a good idea. I have had the stove for a number of years and am tired of replacing the expensive and fragile combustion package. I know there is someone out there that has the experience that I lack that can give some needed guidance.
Thanks mac2
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
92,836
South Puget Sound, WA
I feel your pain. That stove was the one that gave VC a black eye. The newer combustion package is supposed to be made of tougher stuff.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
28,190
central pa
I feel your pain. That stove was the one that gave VC a black eye. The newer combustion package is supposed to be made of tougher stuff.
It is better but still not what I would call durable.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
28,190
central pa
The combustion package on my Resolute acclaim 2490 is deterioated and needs to be replaced. I can fabricate one from plate steel that will replicate the original with all of the needed holes and dimensions. I have been told that the combustion packages function is to channel the air flow in the proper direction and that what I am looking to do will work. I have also asked several stove dealers in the area and they will not voice an opinion and I can understand they are concerned about liability.
What I am looking for is to find out if what I am proposing to is ok , or if it is just plain not a good idea. I have had the stove for a number of years and am tired of replacing the expensive and fragile combustion package. I know there is someone out there that has the experience that I lack that can give some needed guidance.
Thanks mac2
I would expect steel to melt or atleast distort badly if it actually works
 

mac2

New Member
Oct 11, 2021
13
toccoa ga
I would expect steel to melt or atleast distort badly if it actually works
If I up the ante and go to say 1/2 in thick steel, would you expect the same result. I know there are a multitude of stoves made of plate steel, but I wonder if the down draft and the package riding in the center will do as you suggest. Not sure if the plate steel stoves have that kind of baffles inside. I will have to go look at some of them. Thanks for your reply I appreciate it
mac2
 

mac2

New Member
Oct 11, 2021
13
toccoa ga
It is better but still not what I would call durable.
Hard for me to imagine that the steel would not be more durable than the original package. Maybe someone on the site has had some hands on experience. Thanks for your reply. mac2
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
28,190
central pa
If I up the ante and go to say 1/2 in thick steel, would you expect the same result. I know there are a multitude of stoves made of plate steel, but I wonder if the down draft and the package riding in the center will do as you suggest. Not sure if the plate steel stoves have that kind of baffles inside. I will have to go look at some of them. Thanks for your reply I appreciate it
mac2
The stove body doesn't see anywhere near the heat the secondary combustion chamber will see.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
28,190
central pa
Hard for me to imagine that the steel would not be more durable than the original package. Maybe someone on the site has had some hands on experience. Thanks for your reply. mac2
I was talking about the new combustion chambers in new Vermont castings stoves.

And no i do not think steel will be more durable. I would be surprised if it made it through a season unless you use some exotic extremely high heat alloy
 

Diabel

Minister of Fire
Jan 11, 2008
3,527
Ottawa, ON
Hard for me to imagine that the steel would not be more durable than the original package. Maybe someone on the site has had some hands on experience. Thanks for your reply. mac2
Can steel take 1700*F ?
 
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ABMax24

Minister of Fire
Sep 18, 2019
1,445
Grande Prairie, Alberta, Canada
Steel does not take high temperatures well when exposed to oxygen, which is exactly what this setup will do.

You want another alloy for better results, 400 series stainless is commonly used in wood stoves and inside chimneys, 430 is likely the most common grade you will be able to get your hands on and will yield considerably better results than common mild steel.
 

mac2

New Member
Oct 11, 2021
13
toccoa ga
Steel does not take high temperatures well when exposed to oxygen, which is exactly what this setup will do.

You want another alloy for better results, 400 series stainless is commonly used in wood stoves and inside chimneys, 430 is likely the most common grade you will be able to get your hands on and will yield considerably better results than common mild steel.
Thank you for the information. It is obvious that there is much for me to learn and I appreciate your responses. I will do the research on the better stainless and compare costs. If it is in the ball game I may give it a try just to see , if not Ill go back to the burn package. Thank you again for your responses.
 

ABMax24

Minister of Fire
Sep 18, 2019
1,445
Grande Prairie, Alberta, Canada
Thank you for the information. It is obvious that there is much for me to learn and I appreciate your responses. I will do the research on the better stainless and compare costs. If it is in the ball game I may give it a try just to see , if not Ill go back to the burn package. Thank you again for your responses.

There is a significant amount of work to building that burn package by the looks of it. Not a simple endeavor at all.

One thing to consider is the UL listing of that stove will likely be voided by this modification, which may have insurance implications.
 
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bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
28,190
central pa
Thank you for the information. It is obvious that there is much for me to learn and I appreciate your responses. I will do the research on the better stainless and compare costs. If it is in the ball game I may give it a try just to see , if not Ill go back to the burn package. Thank you again for your responses.
I would still be concerned about warping and distortion even with 430 but it atleast haS a chance of working
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
28,190
central pa
thank you for your input. i am looking into the 430 stainless.
mac2
That is a whole lot of effort and money to put into a stove that just isn't very good. I would be looking for a different stove if it was me
 
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mac2

New Member
Oct 11, 2021
13
toccoa ga
That is a whole lot of effort and money to put into a stove that just isn't very good. I would be looking for a different stove if it was me
pic2.jpg pic3.jpg pic4.jpg
After pricing the stainless and the pretty much negative thoughts I changed directions. I made forms out of polystyrene cut with my cnc machine, bought castable refractory cement, poured it and made a new package to go in the stove. Installed it and so far it is working great.
The people that sell the castable product indicate that is should perform well.
Not sure how it is going to work long term, just have to wait and see.
 
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bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
28,190
central pa
View attachment 286395 View attachment 286396 View attachment 286397 After pricing the stainless and the pretty much negative thoughts I changed directions. I made forms out of polystyrene cut with my cnc machine, bought castable refractory cement, poured it and made a new package to go in the stove. Installed it and so far it is working great.
The people that sell the castable product indicate that is should perform well.
Not sure how it is going to work long term, just have to wait and see.
Good luck. I think it will be to brittle and not last long but I hope I am wrong. The whole downdraft design just sucks in general.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
92,836
South Puget Sound, WA
That's a pretty cool rescue. It gets an A+ for creative effort. It's nice to have a CNC machine and the talent to use it well. What castable refractory material was chosen and why?
 

moresnow

Minister of Fire
Jan 13, 2015
1,958
Iowa
If this proves durable I'd bet you may here from a few people;lol Rather curious how this holds up. Nice effort.
 

mac2

New Member
Oct 11, 2021
13
toccoa ga
Good luck. I think it will be to brittle and not last long but I hope I am wrong. The whole downdraft design just sucks in general.
I also hope you are wrong about it being to brittle. The people at Rutland that manufacture the castable refractory cement are confident that if you follow their instructions it will hold up. Their experience with casting fire brick has been positive in that respect. I will have the answer to that question after using it for a while. I had a jotul stove before and I really liked it, but I sold that house and bought a log cabin and ended up with the resolute acclaim and I have to tell you that if the refraction package was not so sorry, the stove performed well for our needs for the last 12 years, and was very user friendly (top or front loading, easy ash removel pan, and with a full load was 6 to 7 hours burn time, and for our needs has been acceptable. I had replaced one burn package and did not want to replace another as you know they are fairly expensive. If this doesn't hold up well I will likely be hunting for a different stove. steve
 
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mac2

New Member
Oct 11, 2021
13
toccoa ga
That's a pretty cool rescue. It gets an A+ for creative effort. It's nice to have a CNC machine and the talent to use it well. What castable refractory material was chosen and why?
RUTLAND Castable Refractory Cement, was the product I used. I ordered it from amazon, but it is also available from local hardware stores. I am also going to cast some fire bricks that will fit my stove as they are looking a little ragged. The stuff works, just like Kwick krete, but it sets up pretty rapidly. The why answer is that I was searching for something that was castable, that would handle the heat and I came across it. I had looked for refractory material that I could easily machine but couldn't source it. steve
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
28,190
central pa
I also hope you are wrong about it being to brittle. The people at Rutland that manufacture the castable refractory cement are confident that if you follow their instructions it will hold up. Their experience with casting fire brick has been positive in that respect. I will have the answer to that question after using it for a while. I had a jotul stove before and I really liked it, but I sold that house and bought a log cabin and ended up with the resolute acclaim and I have to tell you that if the refraction package was not so sorry, the stove performed well for our needs for the last 12 years, and was very user friendly (top or front loading, easy ash removel pan, and with a full load was 6 to 7 hours burn time, and for our needs has been acceptable. I had replaced one burn package and did not want to replace another as you know they are fairly expensive. If this doesn't hold up well I will likely be hunting for a different stove. steve
I really hope I am as well. I have cast lots of refractory stuff but nothing that will take that amount of heat. I am looking forward to hearing about the durability.


If it doesn't hold up there are much higher quality castable refractory cements out there you could try. They get expensive though.
 

mac2

New Member
Oct 11, 2021
13
toccoa ga
I really hope I am as well. I have cast lots of refractory stuff but nothing that will take that amount of heat. I am looking forward to hearing about the durability.


If it doesn't hold up there are much higher quality castable refractory cements out there you could try. They get expensive though.
If it doesn' hold up I will be seeking your info on other castable material. Thanks for your feedback
 
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mac2

New Member
Oct 11, 2021
13
toccoa ga
View attachment 286395 View attachment 286396 View attachment 286397
After pricing the stainless and the pretty much negative thoughts I changed directions. I made forms out of polystyrene cut with my cnc machine, bought castable refractory cement, poured it and made a new package to go in the stove. Installed it and so far it is working great.
The people that sell the castable product indicate that is should perform well.
Not sure how it is going to work long term, just have to wait and see.
Update on home casting refractory package for RESOLUTE ACCLAIM. So far so good no deterioration at this time. Have not used it 24/7 as our temps are not that cold yet. But the colder weather will be here soon. Mac2