Stove Paint Help...What Happened Here?

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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
87,665
South Puget Sound, WA
What a bummer. Rustoleum high-temp black has 30% acetone. There is also AW Perkins Stove paint, but I haven't found the SDS for it yet.
 

Caw

Minister of Fire
May 26, 2020
908
Massachusetts
Well my ash lip was horrible as I strike matches on it to light the stove and 2 coats of stovebrite did the trick
Oh yeah yours looks way better than mine.

All the paint drama is honestly making me feel like it's not even worth touching it up. I'll just sand down these rust spots a little and let Gordon do his think for another season or two then pull/repaint the entire thing. It's not like he's going to stop drooling on it.
 
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Caw

Minister of Fire
May 26, 2020
908
Massachusetts
That's EXACTLY what happened when I painted my Drolet 1400i with Stove Bright metallic black. It did it all over the stove too BTW...and it was wiped down with a commercial pre paint surface prep before painting, stove was totally dry before shooting the paint...and the paint was well mixed.
Hate to say it, but I've had better results from Rustoleum hi temp paints...
What product did you end up using?
 

Caw

Minister of Fire
May 26, 2020
908
Massachusetts
After enough sanding, washing, painting, repeat I managed to get it looking pretty decent. I think its likely because I got enough of the old paint off/new paint on it bonded to itself. It's not perfect but with kids and the dog it will do. I'd be happy if the rest of the stove came out like this but yeah. Idk. Still doesn't feel right.

Now I have a nice pretty ash lip and a skunky looking stove lol.

20210607_153606.jpg 20210607_153619.jpg

"Stop talking about me guys, I can't help it...I am a drooler"

20210607_154011.jpg
 

brenndatomu

Minister of Fire
Aug 21, 2013
6,222
NE Ohio
What product did you end up using?
I ended up getting things to be "good enough" with a bunch of putzing around, just like you did. (used the Stove Bright)
By the way, that ash lip will match the rest of the stove by Christmas...
 
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clancey

Minister of Fire
Feb 26, 2021
708
Colorado
That's the stove that my dealer sells "osborn" and he loves them and that dog of your's is beautiful but worthless and i bet he is a good watch doggy and I love dogs--all kinds and let them all drool --lol especially when they are going to eat,,,My team for hockey I think are in the playoffs--I think--"Avalanche" but not sure and do not keep up with it and "if" they play the bruins (ny) they will surely win..lol clancey I hope the paint gets back to normal for you and what a shock to see those bubbles...Looks nice now...clancey
 

Caw

Minister of Fire
May 26, 2020
908
Massachusetts
So here is the resolution from SBI:

Screenshot_20210607-173235_Gmail.jpg Screenshot_20210607-175049_Drive.jpg


Im happy to get a new ash lip, that could be handy some day, but it really doesn't alleviate my hesitation to paint the stove itself. I think ill just go into it expecting a battle like I had with the lip and sand the chit out of it. That's often the answer in woodworking too lol.

Anyways. Definitely not gonna mess with the stove top until it's worse knowing this is the proper paint.
 
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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
87,665
South Puget Sound, WA
There's nothing in those instructions about sanding down to the bare metal. That would be a royal pita, especially for a touch-up. I have never done that with a stove repaint. If the problem happens on the stovetop, will they send you a new stove?

FWIW, the stove does not look skunky to my eyes. It looks pretty good. Wipe it down with a damp rag and go out and play.
 
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brenndatomu

Minister of Fire
Aug 21, 2013
6,222
NE Ohio
If you want the new stove look again, just wipe it down with bacon grease...the pooch will lick it until it gleams! ;) ;lol
 

moresnow

Minister of Fire
Jan 13, 2015
1,679
Iowa
If you want the new stove look again, just wipe it down with bacon grease...the pooch will lick it until it gleams! ;) ;lol
Haaa! Just the thought of the drool storm turns my stomach ;lol
 

Woody5506

Minister of Fire
Feb 14, 2017
857
Rochester NY
I work in the industrial coatings world and see paint issues often, or rather know what to avoid. Nobody knows how finnicky paint can be (specifically painting metal) until it happens to them. I honestly think the best most user friendly stove paint is Rustoleum. I've sprayed stoves with heavier industrial high heat paints which can look great because they are higher build paints than what you would be spraying out of a spray can, so you get very good coverage with each coat, but for the price and availability Rusto is pretty good.
 
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Rob_Red

Member
Feb 2, 2021
128
Southern New England
I was in the autobody business most of my life and have dealt with this several times.

The paint underneath lifted.

This can happen if it’s sanded to thin. Or if the new finish has an aggressive solvent that will reactivate the original paint. One way to avoid it is to do what’s called a “drop coat” which is a very light almost transparent coat. Do one or two drop coats to build up some thickness then do a finish coat. This allows you to build up some of the new finish with out the solvents bitting into the original paint.

I don’t believe any stove paint is catalyzed (utilizes a hardener or activator) therefore all of it can effected by solvents even if it’s baked on.

If it were me I would only scuff the factory finish with a fine scotch pad rather than hit it with sand paper. Unless you are trying to remove a blemish
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
87,665
South Puget Sound, WA
Good advice Rob. When repainting a stove I have always used fine steel wool to add tooth to the underlying old paint unless faced with a rust situation. And I have always done it with 3 coats, the first being fairly thin, not expecting full coverage.
 
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