Stove pipe question…

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Mr. Kelly

Feeling the Heat
Hi all…

I have about a 6 foot stretch of insulated stove pipe between my stove and the wall, with a couple of 45° twists.

It’s a pain in the butt to get off every year to clean, but I’ve been trying to do it fairly consistently.

Here’s my question… Each time I do this, the very base of where the first pipe sits over the flange on the top of the stove has a slight gap on one side or the other, because the stinking pipes never seem to go on exactly the way they likely should have in the first place, and I suspect it was like this upon initial installation by the stove place I bought it from.

I’ve kind of been ignoring this small gap over the years, which may at best be about an eighth of an inch, because I know that there is about a 2 inch flange, for the lack of a better word, on the top of the stove, that I figure would probably usher the smoke and gases up past the point where this gap is at the bottom.

Is this prudent?

I presume that gravity is going to pull the smoke in an upward direction, without much likelihood of it migrating back down between the flange and the pipe, and out the 8th inch gap on the side.

Any thoughts or science as to whether this makes any sense?

I know I could probably put some sort of heat resistant silicon or putty in the gap, but is it really necessary?

Thoughts and science would be appreciated… :) And I probably deserve a lecture, or two, over this… :)
 

clancey

Minister of Fire
Feb 26, 2021
2,032
Colorado
To me who knows nothing that's sounds like a problem and is there anyway you could get a straight pipe without the angles and "would this help the situation" and make for better draft as well as easier cleaning--just thoughts here and curious why all the angles of the piping in the first place.. You can lecture me if you want and I just want to learn a few things...lol ..This problem can be solved and other more experienced and professional people will help...old mrs clancey
 

Mattsradt

New Member
Nov 21, 2021
21
Washington
Hi all…

I have about a 6 foot stretch of insulated stove pipe between my stove and the wall, with a couple of 45° twists.

It’s a pain in the butt to get off every year to clean, but I’ve been trying to do it fairly consistently.

Here’s my question… Each time I do this, the very base of where the first pipe sits over the flange on the top of the stove has a slight gap on one side or the other, because the stinking pipes never seem to go on exactly the way they likely should have in the first place, and I suspect it was like this upon initial installation by the stove place I bought it from.

I’ve kind of been ignoring this small gap over the years, which may at best be about an eighth of an inch, because I know that there is about a 2 inch flange, for the lack of a better word, on the top of the stove, that I figure would probably usher the smoke and gases up past the point where this gap is at the bottom.

Is this prudent?

I presume that gravity is going to pull the smoke in an upward direction, without much likelihood of it migrating back down between the flange and the pipe, and out the 8th inch gap on the side.

Any thoughts or science as to whether this makes any sense?

I know I could probably put some sort of heat resistant silicon or putty in the gap, but is it really necessary?

Thoughts and science would be appreciated… :) And I probably deserve a lecture, or two, over this… :)
Can you take a picture of your entire setup from inside the room. Im having a similar problem but with me I cant get the pipe over the flange. I want to see why you have a gap.
 

Mr. Kelly

Feeling the Heat
Here are some photos that will show what I mean.

I can’t figure out if there’s any different way of twisting the angled pipes, or the telescopic one, to fit any better than this. Can’t say if it was a tight fit when the installers first put it in about 10 years ago.

I kind of ran the stove all winter last year, likely with a gap similar to that, and I didn’t die of asphyxiation… Don’t know if that is a good endorsement, or not… 😫😵‍💫😤

Thoughts?

43CB8084-4231-4413-B1C6-08614C9FF386.jpeg 7B4A2B39-CB79-4235-9E83-3FD86E9A13F0.jpeg 3EFD5696-8749-4562-9954-793988B13D71.jpeg
 

Mattsradt

New Member
Nov 21, 2021
21
Washington
Here are some photos that will show what I mean.

I can’t figure out if there’s any different way of twisting the angled pipes, or the telescopic one, to fit any better than this. Can’t say if it was a tight fit when the installers first put it in about 10 years ago.

I kind of ran the stove all winter last year, likely with a gap similar to that, and I didn’t die of asphyxiation… Don’t know if that is a good endorsement, or not… 😫😵‍💫😤

Thoughts?

View attachment 286146 View attachment 286147
 

Mattsradt

New Member
Nov 21, 2021
21
Washington
Can you move the stove? It looks like it may need to move a few inches so that gap will sit right. Dont move the pipe just the stove. Also Check to see if the stove is level with the ground.