Sub Compact Tractors

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walhondingnashua

Feeling the Heat
Jul 23, 2016
461
ohio
So I ended up with a 2012 GC2400 in my garage. Everything in pretty good shape. 54" deck, R4 tires with a lot of life left on them, and the hydraulic hook ups for a loader (previous owner had a snow plow that they kept. I'm hoping to save up a little more money and add the loader. I'm overly impressed with how many grease zerks it has on it. You can grease just about every moving part on it. Before I start doing much with it, I want to change all fluids and filters.
To start learning more about this tractor (and any other information I'll need over the years) I want to join a tractor specific forum. As far as I am concerned, these forums are the best source of real-world information you can get. What suggestions to people have for the best forum for me to join for my needs? What is everyone on here using?
 

Ashful

Minister of Fire
Mar 7, 2012
16,208
Philadelphia
Congratulations! Start hunting a loader now, if you want one, used loaders are rarer than hen's teeth. You may find in the end that it's easier and cheaper to just buy a tractor with a loader, and resell either your tractor or the one that came with the new loader, depending on which is in better condition.

Deere and Kubota (the "big 2") have their own brand-specific forums, but I'm not sure if any exist for Massey. The tractorbynet forum is always a good place to start, and I do believe they have an MF sub-forum there. If there's a better forum out there, you'll likely also find that posted somewhere at tractorbynet.

Happy tractoring!
 
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walhondingnashua

Feeling the Heat
Jul 23, 2016
461
ohio
On the loader topic...
I've noticed how hard a used one is to find. My plan is to actually buy a brand new one. The valves are a very expensive part of that set up and installing them has a high cost than adding the loader itself. Installing the loader for me at this point would be supper easy. I have even been considering finding a cheaper, older loader from any machine and figuring out how to fab it on. Having the hydros was the most important part to me. The few used I have seen are only slightly cheaper than a new one and if I ever sold, I'm sure I would get most of my money back.

I have been on the tractorbynet forum before and it looks like it has good information. I will probably join. It's really hard to beat the information you can get on a forum. The fact that I can get feedback or advice from someone that lives in Oregon has really broadened the information pool.
 
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duramaxman05

Minister of Fire
Aug 17, 2014
647
Perryville, Mo
So I ended up with a 2012 GC2400 in my garage. Everything in pretty good shape. 54" deck, R4 tires with a lot of life left on them, and the hydraulic hook ups for a loader (previous owner had a snow plow that they kept. I'm hoping to save up a little more money and add the loader. I'm overly impressed with how many grease zerks it has on it. You can grease just about every moving part on it. Before I start doing much with it, I want to change all fluids and filters.
To start learning more about this tractor (and any other information I'll need over the years) I want to join a tractor specific forum. As far as I am concerned, these forums are the best source of real-world information you can get. What suggestions to people have for the best forum for me to join for my needs? What is everyone on here using?
I don't know how massey ferguson are set up, but if it has the loader/blade control around the rear fender area, you shouldn't need the valve thus lowering the cost quite a bit
 

walhondingnashua

Feeling the Heat
Jul 23, 2016
461
ohio
I don't know how massey ferguson are set up, but if it has the loader/blade control around the rear fender area, you shouldn't need the valve thus lowering the cost quite a bit
It actually has the 4 quick connect fittings on the right foot deck in front of the hydro pedals and a joystick ready to go. I haven't done any measurements but I know the Rural King tractors (TYM) have a very similar style loader. Bolt on pattern for the brackets are different, but they are more than $1000 cheaper than one from Massey (agco). A little fabrication and maybe it will work. Just brainstorming ideas though.
 

Ashful

Minister of Fire
Mar 7, 2012
16,208
Philadelphia
It actually has the 4 quick connect fittings on the right foot deck in front of the hydro pedals and a joystick ready to go. I haven't done any measurements but I know the Rural King tractors (TYM) have a very similar style loader. Bolt on pattern for the brackets are different, but they are more than $1000 cheaper than one from Massey (agco). A little fabrication and maybe it will work. Just brainstorming ideas though.
You may find someone on tractor by net who has already done this conversion/fab.
 

salecker

Minister of Fire
Aug 22, 2010
1,778
Northern Canada
Well it’s a compact not a sub but buying tires isn’t to be taken lightly. Here is what 4600 bucks looks like on my rims that had R1’s.
In round numbers that’s 1/7 of the cost of the machine. View attachment 294197
Thats nuts to spend that kind of money on tiny tires
I can by new tires for my 426 Cat backhoe and have $$ left over for that money.
 

salecker

Minister of Fire
Aug 22, 2010
1,778
Northern Canada
I'm not sure how this translates to 5 mph show pushing machines, but one thing I learned driving light pickups on big tires (and then displayed exceedingly well driving a dually), is that narrow tires are key in snow at on-road speeds. Those old army Jeep guys knew a thing or two, I guess.

The wide tires just plane atop the snow, while narrow tires bite thru to the asphalt beneath. I wonder how that translates to a tractor doing 5 mph, but I suspect it does. I'm noting the relatively narrow profile of your rears, as compared to a R3, and wondering if that's part of why they're recommended for snow duty.
The smaller the contact patch the better the traction
The smaller the contact patch the more pounds per square inch,which sucks in soft conditions like mud,
The one reason mudders are usually big and wide.
I have 2 950's each on different size tires, one is taller and skinny tires,the other lower and fat.You can see the difference in different surfaces,each with pro's and con's
Another difference is bias and radials. The radials will out dig the bias on most surfaces.
 

duramaxman05

Minister of Fire
Aug 17, 2014
647
Perryville, Mo
It actually has the 4 quick connect fittings on the right foot deck in front of the hydro pedals and a joystick ready to go. I haven't done any measurements but I know the Rural King tractors (TYM) have a very similar style loader. Bolt on pattern for the brackets are different, but they are more than $1000 cheaper than one from Massey (agco). A little fabrication and maybe it will work. Just brainstorming ideas though.
You could try to find a bushhog, westerndorf or other aftermarket loader too.
 

Ashful

Minister of Fire
Mar 7, 2012
16,208
Philadelphia
Thats nuts to spend that kind of money on tiny tires
I can by new tires for my 426 Cat backhoe and have $$ left over for that money.
"Tiny tires"? You might want to double-check your numbers, salecker. The tires on that tractor are likely larger than the Cat 426.

The stock tires on LP's Deere 4720 are 8-ply 13.6-28, or 51.6 diameter x 13.6 width. The stock tires on your Cat 426, which you're somehow implying is much larger, are also 8-ply and actually of smaller to equal diameter... at 50.6 - 52.0 inches, (depending on options). The CAT tires are a bit wider, but I believe tractor tire pricing is more dependent on diameter and ply count than width.
 
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Ashful

Minister of Fire
Mar 7, 2012
16,208
Philadelphia
You could try to find a bushhog, westerndorf or other aftermarket loader too.
I briefly had in my stable a Deere 750 with a Johnson loader. It fit, a prior owner did the hard work on that, but removing it was a full day project. It made it basically impossible to use the tractor for anything other than a dedicated loader machine.

The OP is in a different situation, wanting to use this tractor for mowing, among other homeowner tasks. For this reason, I'd not even consider any loader without the following two options:

1. quick removal, with integrated or automatic kick-stands
2. quick-change bucket, whether JDQA or SSQA

Even though my loader is quick removal, with automatic kickstands, even that gets old and tedious. If I'm going to spread fertilizer on the lawn with my 3-pt spreader, or run the aerator around the lawn real quick, I'll often just pull the JDQA pins and drop the 450 lb. bucket, rather than removing the loader.

If you hang around any tractor forum, you'll see countless "JDQA vs. SSQA" threads, it's their version of "cat vs. non-cat". Well, begreen will be amazed to hear me say, "it doesn't matter". Both systems work, the JDQA is a bit nicer but the SSQA is a bit more prevalent and sometimes cheaper, but both get the job done. It really doesn't matter which you get, just don't make the horrible mistake of buying a pinned-on bucket, or you will hate yourself for decades to come.
 
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ericm979

Member
Nov 2, 2018
97
California
tractorbynet is a useful forum for tractor stuff.

Loaders are usually hard to find. The brackets that attach to the tractor to mount the loader can be even harder to find. They are specific to the tractor and the loader. Few people sell their loaders and even fewer sell the brackets as they can be some work to remove.

It's unlikely that anything other than the factory loader for that model will have the right stands and geometry to make it easy to remove.

The sooner you can obtain the factory loader and brackets the better.

I've not used JDQA but SSQA works fine and has the most attachments. The larger implement companies may offer both styles for some of their attachments but the smaller ones often are SSQA only.
 

Bad LP

Minister of Fire
Nov 28, 2014
2,001
Northern Maine
"Tiny tires"? You might want to double-check your numbers, salecker. The tires on that tractor are likely larger than the Cat 426.

The stock tires on LP's Deere 4720 are 8-ply 13.6-28, or 51.6 diameter x 13.6 width. The stock tires on your Cat 426, which you're somehow implying is much larger, are also 8-ply and actually of smaller to equal diameter... at 50.6 - 52.0 inches, (depending on options). The CAT tires are a bit wider, but I believe tractor tire pricing is more dependent on diameter and ply count than width.
These numbers are correct. Fronts are 8.5X16.
These are radial tires. $$
Loaded. $$
Tubes. $$
Dismount and mount $$
Disposal. $$
Pickup, delivery was 160 miles and my labor was free.

Most importantly; How useful is a tractor with flat or blown out tires??

Yesterday I moved a bunch of snow slides from my metal roof and fire pit area. Pure ice and large granduler. These tires performed flawlessly. Something unobtainium with the R1’s. I don’t think my old turfs would have done anywhere near as well.
Edit: I failed to mention that in addition to traveling at will on the ice and snow my backing up and turning area was on my dirt (mud season) driveway that only had the mornings cold crusty topping. They did not ruin that limited area. Again, something the R1’s would not do. About the same amount of disturbance as the turfs might have done. That NH 4835 was a much larger and heavier frame machine.
 
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Ashful

Minister of Fire
Mar 7, 2012
16,208
Philadelphia
Yep... I was just comparing rears, since that's where all the money tends to go. :)

I remember shopping new tires for my last tractor, all four corners. After seeing the prices, decided the 35 year old rear tires had some life left in them, after all. ;lol
 
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Bad LP

Minister of Fire
Nov 28, 2014
2,001
Northern Maine
Yep... I was just comparing rears, since that's where all the money tends to go. :)

I remember shopping new tires for my last tractor, all four corners. After seeing the prices, decided the 35 year old rear tires had some life left in them, after all. ;lol
Yep... I was just comparing rears, since that's where all the money tends to go. :)

I remember shopping new tires for my last tractor, all four corners. After seeing the prices, decided the 35 year old rear tires had some life left in them, after all. ;lol
I’m looking at 61 and mostly retired for now till I get bored. If I last another 10-15 I know my tires were a great investment. Machine is garaged.
 

Ashful

Minister of Fire
Mar 7, 2012
16,208
Philadelphia
I’m looking at 61 and mostly retired for now till I get bored. If I last another 10-15 I know my tires were a great investment. Machine is garaged.
I had a 1963'ish Cub Cadet 123, until about 8 years ago, wearing original rubber. Always garage kept and out of the sun, the tires never went bad.

However, I do get a kick out of people who lament, "they don't build them like they used to." Thank God they don't. The thing was ridiculously over-built in many needless areas, while simultaneously woefully under-engineered and poorly built in many critical areas. It had a rear diff assembly that would last 30 years in an F250, but the gas tank fitting would break every ~100 hours of use. The driveshaft between engine and hydro pump was so wimpy that it bent under the engine's own 12 hp. All repairable stuff, but it needed to be, it broke so often.

Today's tractors are much better engineered, with the better among them having each component exactly as strong as it needs to be, nothing wasted and far less critical things overlooked. Maybe you can't repair them with what you find on the shelf at the hardware store on a Sunday anymore, but you likely won't need to, either.
 

Rusty18

Burning Hunk
Nov 3, 2018
172
Belpre oh
However, I do get a kick out of people who lament, "they don't build them like they used to." Thank God they don't.
lol I say the same thing about trucks, started out in a 1971 Mack r700. 335 Cummins, 5spd trans with a 4 spd aux trans, tandem Mack rears. No heat, no ac, no noticeable suspension, no muffler !!!. But that truck is still running today...
 

Bad LP

Minister of Fire
Nov 28, 2014
2,001
Northern Maine
I had a 1963'ish Cub Cadet 123, until about 8 years ago, wearing original rubber. Always garage kept and out of the sun, the tires never went bad.

However, I do get a kick out of people who lament, "they don't build them like they used to." Thank God they don't. The thing was ridiculously over-built in many needless areas, while simultaneously woefully under-engineered and poorly built in many critical areas. It had a rear diff assembly that would last 30 years in an F250, but the gas tank fitting would break every ~100 hours of use. The driveshaft between engine and hydro pump was so wimpy that it bent under the engine's own 12 hp. All repairable stuff, but it needed to be, it broke so often.

Today's tractors are much better engineered, with the better among them having each component exactly as strong as it needs to be, nothing wasted and far less critical things overlooked. Maybe you can't repair them with what you find on the shelf at the hardware store on a Sunday anymore, but you likely won't need to, either.
This newer stuff is not going to be repaired by the average Joe Homeowner. Computers, sensors everywhere, I’m sure there’s a bunch of multiplex wiring and other crap as well.
I’m hoping keeping it clean so that moisture doesn’t build in the connections and dirt (mostly in the F/R pedal box) doesn’t grind away moving parts. Keeping the oils and filters fresh is easy.
 

Bad LP

Minister of Fire
Nov 28, 2014
2,001
Northern Maine
lol I say the same thing about trucks, started out in a 1971 Mack r700. 335 Cummins, 5spd trans with a 4 spd aux trans, tandem Mack rears. No heat, no ac, no noticeable suspension, no muffler !!!. But that truck is still running today...
I spent some time in a B81. Truck went wherever or thru where it was pointed. My OTR Mack would just stop in the middle of a mud puddle. 😂
 

hedge wood

Feeling the Heat
Mar 1, 2009
298
Eastern NE
So I ended up with a 2012 GC2400 in my garage. Everything in pretty good shape. 54" deck, R4 tires with a lot of life left on them, and the hydraulic hook ups for a loader (previous owner had a snow plow that they kept. I'm hoping to save up a little more money and add the loader. I'm overly impressed with how many grease zerks it has on it. You can grease just about every moving part on it. Before I start doing much with it, I want to change all fluids and filters.
To start learning more about this tractor (and any other information I'll need over the years) I want to join a tractor specific forum. As far as I am concerned, these forums are the best source of real-world information you can get. What suggestions to people have for the best forum for me to join for my needs? What is everyone on here using?
Glad you found a tractor. That Agco I had for years was a solid tractor. I would joint tractorby.net. Probably won't have much luck buying a used loader. The new after market loaders are very high price. Wanting a loader was one of the main reasons I sold the Agco and bought a Kubota with a loader. Never could find a loader for the Agco and a new loader was out of reach for price.
 

SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
6,745
Downeast Maine
This newer stuff is not going to be repaired by the average Joe Homeowner. Computers, sensors everywhere, I’m sure there’s a bunch of multiplex wiring and other crap as well.
I’m hoping keeping it clean so that moisture doesn’t build in the connections and dirt (mostly in the F/R pedal box) doesn’t grind away moving parts. Keeping the oils and filters fresh is easy.
Younger people can handle the electronics and such, it's just old people that don't like it.
 
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hedge wood

Feeling the Heat
Mar 1, 2009
298
Eastern NE
lol I say the same thing about trucks, started out in a 1971 Mack r700. 335 Cummins, 5spd trans with a 4 spd aux trans, tandem Mack rears. No heat, no ac, no noticeable suspension, no muffler !!!. But that truck is still running today...
My family had a truck stop service station and ran trucks when I was a kid the first trucks I drove burned gas. My dad bought his first diesel semi's in 1966 single axle tractors. When I went to work as a mechanic in the mid to late 70's the grocery out fit I worked for had a whole fleet of 60's mode R-600 Mack's with 237 Mack engines Mack 5 speed trans and camel back rears. Those guys ran them a thousand to two thousand miles a week. Had heat no AC. They ran those old Mack's into the late 80's early 90's. In the mid 80's I started putting some Red Dot Ac's in some of them. We always had a couple complete rebuilt spare engines around and would swap a complete engine when we lost one or wore out one. It was a union outfit. Today you couldn't get a driver in a truck like that.
 

SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
6,745
Downeast Maine
Except most young people can't hold a screwdriver is my observation.
Neither can most old people. Rural communities have plenty of young people wrenching on modern cars and trucks, and when I lived near a city many of my friends swapped motors on modern cars with CAN BUS systems. I know many people who built their own ECU's, and the kids just now getting into cars are making their own android operating systems to control vehicle functions. Most young people are more into electronics than cars or agricultural equipment, so they would be using screwdrivers more often rather than wrenches. The tastes of people younger than you are simply different, not better or worse.

You just don't know a lot of young people or see any that are into cars and agricultural equipment. You have a sample size error and are using that to represent millions of people across all walks of life.
 

kennyp2339

Minister of Fire
Feb 16, 2014
6,532
07462
This newer stuff is not going to be repaired by the average Joe Homeowner. Computers, sensors everywhere, I’m sure there’s a bunch of multiplex wiring and other crap as well
With company's now gate keeping info and locking computers your dam right, hence all the right to repair laws that are being shot down one by one due to campaign contributions and lobbying.