Too hot (Englander)

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Coinnigh

New Member
Sep 26, 2021
5
Vermont
Hello,

We've used a Tempwood for many years as the main source of heat for a 900 foot house which was built in 1947, is badly insulated and which would be very difficult to insulate properly (because of the construction). The windows are old too. TheTempwood has been all we needed. We have a back-up oil furnace which we keep as low as it can go, at 50. The Tempwood is now getting fragile by the pipe. We can either get a mobile welder (difficult!) to come and weld a plate onto it; or buy a new stove.

After researching, we're planning on buying an Englander NC 32. (We like simple stoves and are not rich.) The NC32 probably does not really heat 2400 feet as the company claims, but do you think it might put out too much heat, compared to the Tempwood? The stove is in the far corner of the living room, the most used room. On the other side of the two walls of a built-in stairway compartment is the kitchen and bathroom. Two rooms upstairs; basement below. We live at 1600 feet altitude in Vermont, and though winter doesn't get as cold as it used to, it gets cold

So, back to the question: Can anyone compare the amount of radiant heat the NC32 puts out compared to the Tempwood? Should we buy the Englander that claims to heat 2000 feet, instead of the NC32? Thanks!
 

brenndatomu

Minister of Fire
Aug 21, 2013
6,564
NE Ohio
You should be ok, you will just need to learn how to load it for the heat output that you want out of it...load smaller loads, or lower BTU wood on warmer days...my inlaws have a NC30 (VERY similar to the 32) in a newer 2500 ft house that is well insulated, and its too much, but I showed them how to load log cabin style so that the stove burns hot n clean, but not for hours and hours on end like a larger load would do.
Plus if the house is as poorly insulated as you say, you will need the extra heat when it gets real cold.
I don't know what kind of a time frame you are on, but if you aren't in a pinch, keep an eye on these guys, they sell factory seconds from Englander, they have full warranty and free shipping, some nice savings to be had there too! Don't see a NC32 right now, but inventory changes all the time...you might call Andy and see if he knows if there is any coming soon...they are really good to work with...good reputation here on Hearth too! (I have no affiliation with them, just a fan)
 
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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
90,555
South Puget Sound, WA
The NC-32 is a bit oversized. For comparison, a friend's sister lives in a 2 story, Ohio house that was heated with a Tempwood for 30+ yrs. They switched to a 2 cu ft Lopi Endeavor and it worked out well. The Englander 15-W03 should handle the heating needs.
What is the flue setup for the Tempwood? If it is short, it may not be sufficient for a modern stove. Also, dry wood will be essential for proper operation with a new stove.
 

Coinnigh

New Member
Sep 26, 2021
5
Vermont
The NC-32 is a bit oversized. For comparison, a friend's sister lives in a 2 story, Ohio house that was heated with a Tempwood for 30+ yrs. They switched to a 2 cu ft Lopi Endeavor and it worked out well. The Englander 15-W03 should handle the heating needs.
What is the flue setup for the Tempwood? If it is short, it may not be sufficient for a modern stove. Also, dry wood will be essential for proper operation with a new stove.
Thanks for the very helpful information.

We used the Tempwood in a previous house, then brought it here to this house that was not previously set up for a wood stove, so the set-up is all new and professionally-done, with a 20 foot rise in the flue outside the house.

It sounds like we should buy the 15-W03, maybe...
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
90,555
South Puget Sound, WA
In value stoves, this is a good choice. I like that it can be loaded N/S. This allows one to load the stove fully without worrying about the wood rolling into the stove glass during the burn. The True North TN20 and Lopi Endeavor also have a square firebox that can be N/S loaded.
 

Coinnigh

New Member
Sep 26, 2021
5
Vermont
Hi,

A last question for the knowledgeable: our house is badly-insulated and leaks heat, and the Tempwood has put out the right amount of heat for us. Is the Englander 15-W03 likely to be able to put out a comparable level of heat, or would the NC32 be necessary, given the leaky house, do you think? We don't want to install a stove that would be fine in most places, but maybe not up to the job in this case.

Thanks again!
 

armanidog

Feeling the Heat
Jan 8, 2017
360
Northeast Georgia
I have an old leaky house. I suggest the NC32. You can always put in less wood. I remember you all had several arctic air masses move in to Vermont last year.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
90,555
South Puget Sound, WA
I'd get to work on sealing those leaks. That will provide long term benefits regardless of stove choice. You could also make some storm windows with a simple frame and heavy duty clear plastic sheeting or put up stretch film storms inside. Both can make a notable difference. As noted earlier, a stove the size of the 2.5 cu ft 15-W03 will match the Tempwood's heat output, but much more efficiently. With a little work on tightening up the 900 sq ft house it should work well and have excess heating capacity for those very cold days. Milder days may require smaller fires.
 

peakbagger

Minister of Fire
Jul 11, 2008
6,597
Northern NH
FYI, modern EPA stoves have the reputation of less operating range, IE less turndown than pre EPA stoves. In order to burn clean the normal low tech approach is install secondary air ports that can not be closed. If you are used to filling up the stove before bed and then cranking down the air to run a longer burn, you will need to relearn stove operation.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
90,555
South Puget Sound, WA
If you are used to filling up the stove before bed and then cranking down the air to run a longer burn, you will need to relearn stove operation.
Yes, it's true that modern EPA stoves run differently than most old pre-EPA stoves. They are designed to prevent smoldering and have a somewhat different burn cycle. When the primary air is closed down the secondary air normally is not regulated (except on a few stoves like PE & Enviro). However, loading up full for an overnight burn is standard procedure during colder weather. The key is to start turning down the air as soon as good secondary burn starts. A digital flue probe is really helpful for noting when to do this. With some practice a good overnight burn is regularly achievable if the firebox is large enough. The timing will depend on the firebox size, the wood, outside temperature and the heat loss rate of the house. Also, the way the stove burns will depend on how the fuel is loaded. The wood will burn quicker and hotter if loaded criss-cross so that a lot of air can circulate around the wood and slower in a tightly packed firebox.

There is a sticky thread on starting and running an EPA stove at the top of this forum. It includes temperatures at the various stages of the fire for guidance.