Tree ID, Understory tree ID

mrd1995

Member
Feb 21, 2020
165
North East, Pa
We have been exploring our little woodlot this week now that a lot of the briars and stuff are dying back. We came across a few interesting things, one being Hophornbeam I am assuming the Eastern variety see the bark in the first picture. I take pride in learning what we have growing on our land and have been blown away by the size of the Sassafras Trees on our lot, 100% + Id see picture two.

20201028_173934[1].jpg
20201028_173549[1].jpg

And then we came upon these mystery trees, my initial thought is a elm of some sort. Any ideas, tree is about 8-10" in diameter and 30' give or take. I was not able to find anything that lead me to think well that could be it... see picture 3-5.

20201028_173240[1].jpg 20201028_173233[1].jpg 20201028_173221[1].jpg



Any ideas are much appreciated.
Thank you,
Michael
 

johneh

Minister of Fire
Dec 19, 2009
3,119
Eastern Ontario
The second picture looks like beech but my picture ID is poor
to you are way out in left field. That is a nice size ironwood (Hopshornbeam)
 

mrd1995

Member
Feb 21, 2020
165
North East, Pa
The second picture looks like beech but my picture ID is poor
to you are way out in left field. That is a nice size ironwood (Hopshornbeam)
The three pictures in a row are of the same tree.
 

CincyBurner

Minister of Fire
Mar 10, 2015
524
SW Ohio
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mrd1995

Member
Feb 21, 2020
165
North East, Pa

TreePointer

Minister of Fire
Sep 22, 2010
3,106
PA
Tips:

1. Sometimes I take binoculars with me to look at leaves in tree branches.

2. Consider taking a picture of leaves/leaf on the ground that's the same as those still up in the tree.

3. Often overlooked, but one of the best ways to get a precise ID on a tree is to take a picture of a twig with buds and leaf scars.
 

Jonathan2001

New Member
Feb 12, 2019
4
Michigan
1. Eastern hop hornbeam. Lovely lilttle trees that can be 50 years old and only 5 inches diameter if grown in deep shade. The understory in my SE Michigan forest is full of them. They seem to die off around 40-50 years old and remain dead standing for a while. Easy to find them sub-20% moisture content dead standing, and burn as hot as white oak but less finicky than white oak. Coals up great like all the ultra-dense species.

2. Looks like cottonwood based on large, deep ridges in bark. Handsome bark. Lousy firewood.

3. The first of the group of 3 looks like basswood. Basswood bark changes dramatically as it ages, starting as smooth and gray, then it looks the the first of the group of 3 at middle age, and finally gets dark brown, deep ridges at maturity. The second photo in the group of 3 looks almost like a hickory (not shagbark or shell bark... one of the somewhat less common, like pignut or bitternut). Except I know you said it's the same tree... Plus, al the hickories around here grow straight, almost without exception.
 

mrd1995

Member
Feb 21, 2020
165
North East, Pa
Tips:

1. Sometimes I take binoculars with me to look at leaves in tree branches.

2. Consider taking a picture of leaves/leaf on the ground that's the same as those still up in the tree.

3. Often overlooked, but one of the best ways to get a precise ID on a tree is to take a picture of a twig with buds and leaf scars.
I will try the binocular trick, the first limb is above my reach unfortunately.
 

mrd1995

Member
Feb 21, 2020
165
North East, Pa
1. Eastern hop hornbeam. Lovely lilttle trees that can be 50 years old and only 5 inches diameter if grown in deep shade. The understory in my SE Michigan forest is full of them. They seem to die off around 40-50 years old and remain dead standing for a while. Easy to find them sub-20% moisture content dead standing, and burn as hot as white oak but less finicky than white oak. Coals up great like all the ultra-dense species.

2. Looks like cottonwood based on large, deep ridges in bark. Handsome bark. Lousy firewood.

3. The first of the group of 3 looks like basswood. Basswood bark changes dramatically as it ages, starting as smooth and gray, then it looks the the first of the group of 3 at middle age, and finally gets dark brown, deep ridges at maturity. The second photo in the group of 3 looks almost like a hickory (not shagbark or shell bark... one of the somewhat less common, like pignut or bitternut). Except I know you said it's the same tree... Plus, al the hickories around here grow straight, almost without exception.
I thought it was cottonwood at first too, the cottonwood up here seems to have a light battleship grey bark, not sure if the location changes that? Also the tree in the second picture has the iconic different leaf shapes on one limb.