what does serial number look like?

engravosaurus

New Member
Mar 11, 2019
8
Washington State
Hi
Bought house with old Stardance D25 Vermont Castings gas stove. Works fine save for...
Two queries please.
1) Trying to find serial number. Said to be on back of stove. Stove is near wall so viewing with mirror and all is backwards. And lotsa numbers. What would a serial number look like?
2) The valve called "regulator" does nothing. Flames do not go up down as I turn it. Is this a simple fix or do I call a repair person? How can turning the knob do nothing?
Thanks.
 

wooduser

Minister of Fire
Nov 12, 2018
680
seattle, wa
1) Trying to find serial number. Said to be on back of stove. Stove is near wall so viewing with mirror and all is backwards. And lotsa numbers. What would a serial number look like?

There is a rating plate somewhere on the stove that has the name of the manufacturer, model and serial number. I don't know where that would be on your stove, but "a bunch of numbers" sounds like a likely prospect for a rating plate.

<<The valve called "regulator" does nothing. Flames do not go up down as I turn it. Is this a simple fix or do I call a repair person? How can turning the knob do nothing?>>


Post the make and model of the part, which should be listed on the front of the part.
 

engravosaurus

New Member
Mar 11, 2019
8
Washington State
There is a rating plate somewhere on the stove that has the name of the manufacturer, model and serial number. I don't know where that would be on your stove, but "a bunch of numbers" sounds like a likely prospect for a rating plate.

<<The valve called "regulator" does nothing. Flames do not go up down as I turn it. Is this a simple fix or do I call a repair person? How can turning the knob do nothing?>>


Post the make and model of the part, which should be listed on the front of the part.
thanks
pic of stove below, it is Vermont Castings DV25, #2643; can find no rating plate; digital manual sent by VC said rating plate hangs from cable on the valve; so maybe over years it was lost

actually, what does "cable" mean?

pic of valve below as well; somewhere on this site I saw that valve can change pressure with no change in flame dimensions

thanks again
IMG_2910.jpeg
IMG_2914.jpeg
 
Last edited:

engravosaurus

New Member
Mar 11, 2019
8
Washington State
There is a rating plate somewhere on the stove that has the name of the manufacturer, model and serial number. I don't know where that would be on your stove, but "a bunch of numbers" sounds like a likely prospect for a rating plate.

<<The valve called "regulator" does nothing. Flames do not go up down as I turn it. Is this a simple fix or do I call a repair person? How can turning the knob do nothing?>>


Post the make and model of the part, which should be listed on the front of the part.
here is stuff behind stove, I see no serial type number

IMG_2899.jpeg
 
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engravosaurus

New Member
Mar 11, 2019
8
Washington State
There is a rating plate somewhere on the stove that has the name of the manufacturer, model and serial number. I don't know where that would be on your stove, but "a bunch of numbers" sounds like a likely prospect for a rating plate.

<<The valve called "regulator" does nothing. Flames do not go up down as I turn it. Is this a simple fix or do I call a repair person? How can turning the knob do nothing?>>

Post the make and model of the part, which should be listed on the front of the part.
I found this "under" the valve. Maybe rating plate is "under" something. Jees.

IMG_2916.jpeg
 
Last edited by a moderator:

wooduser

Minister of Fire
Nov 12, 2018
680
seattle, wa
The pictures are a help.

Nothing looks like a rating plate in the pictures. The idea that it hung on a chain and is now missing is plausible.

Why are you keen on finding the serial number? It's rare that I ever had a need for that. Usually the make and model identified the equipment pretty well.

You might look under the front of the fireplace for a rating plate.

The low/high dial on the gas valve adjusts the main burner gas pressure. You need to take the screw holding the dial off, pull the dial off and you can then reset the range the knob will adjust. Some experimentation should find a range that adjust the size of the main burner up and down.

The gas valve was manufactured in 1996 and the stove probably not long thereafter. It looks like it is in good condition for being 23 years old.
 

engravosaurus

New Member
Mar 11, 2019
8
Washington State
The pictures are a help.

Nothing looks like a rating plate in the pictures. The idea that it hung on a chain and is now missing is plausible.

Why are you keen on finding the serial number? It's rare that I ever had a need for that. Usually the make and model identified the equipment pretty well.

You might look under the front of the fireplace for a rating plate.

The low/high dial on the gas valve adjusts the main burner gas pressure. You need to take the screw holding the dial off, pull the dial off and you can then reset the range the knob will adjust. Some experimentation should find a range that adjust the size of the main burner up and down.

The gas valve was manufactured in 1996 and the stove probably not long thereafter. It looks like it is in good condition for being 23 years old.
thanks
why serial #? oh dunno, maybe just compulsive; but seems when I order parts for this or that I need serial #, but maybe not for stoves

adjust dial? I can do that or I need a skilled service person?

dates? thanks

is in good shape
 

coaly

Fisher Moderator
Staff member
Dec 22, 2007
3,485
NE PA
You will not need a serial number for ordering parts for this heater. When a manufacturer changes a part during production of a model, many times they will use a certain part before a serial #....... and a different part after serial #.......... All parts listed for this model use the same parts with no part number changes through production. An insurance company may ask for a serial number, or a fuel supplier may fill out forms for each appliance requiring a serial number. That prevents customers from changing out appliances causing and the supply company to not be aware of the appliances in use. Not all gas companies have a record of serial numbers on file.

The "cable" is a stainless steel cable like a twisted wire (not solid) such as used on a bicycle brake cable or throttle cable of chain saws or grass trimmers...... connected to a large metal tag with lighting instructions containing a UL Listing as well as other certifications the appliance was tested for. Many times that tag will be stamped with a model and serial number.
 

engravosaurus

New Member
Mar 11, 2019
8
Washington State
connected to a large metal tag with lighting instructions/QUOTE]

You did it! You solved the puzzle! I had been searching for a "small" metal tag stuck on the stove somewhere. You used the words "large" and "lighting instructions". I recalled that in the folder that we found in this old house was a "large" stiff thing with "lighting instructions". Dug it and sure nuf, the rating plate. Serial # is P2921. So a puzzle checked off. Thanks. pic below

Now then, can I adjust the regulator or must a skilled technician do that?
IMG_2921.jpeg
 

coaly

Fisher Moderator
Staff member
Dec 22, 2007
3,485
NE PA
There you go, notice the hole in the upper corner that was connected to a wire "cable".

Also notice the input BTU on the tag; 22,500 and 25,000. That is how much the main burner orifice allows through at any given pressure. System pressure from regulator at source is set at 11 inches water column (WC) this is about 1/2 psi. The regulator on gas valve you were asking about controls the pressure through valve to main orifice. Is doesn't reduce pressure much, so many times it is not visible looking at flames. You can normally hear a slight change in gas flow when you adjust it up and down. The only way to be sure would be a IR (infra red thermometer) checking surface temp on the top. Let it on high about 30 minutes, take a reading and let it on low about 30 minutes and compare readings. It should be slightly lower. To give you an idea of BTU, the difference is about what one stove top burner would be on a small burner of a gas kitchen range. More like a simmer burner.

They don't reduce the flame much since a direct vent appliance relies on the flow moving up and out of the exhaust. This flow creates a low pressure area or slight vacuum in the burner chamber which atmospheric air pressure outside PUSHES into the air intake allowing oxygen into the burner. So reducing the exhaust flow reduces the incoming air, which creates a richer air fuel mixture capable of sooting up glass, logs, exhaust, among other problems.

To test the regulator on valve, a manometer (very low pressure gauge) is connected to the orifice to test pressure. The result of turning that control up and down is so minimal, simply leave it on high is my recommendation. (I'm retired from my own propane service business of over 25 years) I've seen many that did very little. Again, listen carefully, if the sound changes from min to max, it's making a difference.

** Notice the label states at the bottom; "removal of this label will void compliance". Codes require certification and testing labels to remain attached to the appliance. Removing any label looses the testing certification, so a tested appliance using UL standard testing criteria is no longer "Listed" which no longer allows it's use. Just like removing a Vin number from a vehicle, it is no longer legally usable. That tag should be attached with a metallic cable or wire (copper is better than nothing) to the appliance wrapped around and tightened on a screw. (stainless is used to avoid melting in a fire) The serial number is stamped into the metal instead of a sticker, also in case of fire. (codes require it to be stamped or engraved) **

Many manufacturers have gone to larger tags so you can see them better when lighting than a sticker applied on the appliance where it is hard to see.
 
Last edited:

engravosaurus

New Member
Mar 11, 2019
8
Washington State
There you go, notice the hole in the upper corner that was connected to a wire "cable".

Also notice the input BTU on the tag; 22,500 and 25,000. That is how much the main burner orifice allows through at any given pressure. System pressure from regulator at source is set at 11 inches water column (WC) this is about 1/2 psi. The regulator on gas valve you were asking about controls the pressure through valve to main orifice. Is doesn't reduce pressure much, so many times it is not visible looking at flames. You can normally hear a slight change in gas flow when you adjust it up and down. The only way to be sure would be a IR (infra red thermometer) checking surface temp on the top. Let it on high about 30 minutes, take a reading and let it on low about 30 minutes and compare readings. It should be slightly lower. To give you an idea of BTU, the difference is about what one stove top burner would be on a small burner of a gas kitchen range. More like a simmer burner.

They don't reduce the flame much since a direct vent appliance relies on the flow moving up and out of the exhaust. This flow creates a low pressure area or slight vacuum in the burner chamber which atmospheric air pressure outside PUSHES into the air intake allowing oxygen into the burner. So reducing the exhaust flow reduces the incoming air, which creates a richer air fuel mixture capable of sooting up glass, logs, exhaust, among other problems.

To test the regulator on valve, a manometer (very low pressure gauge) is connected to the orifice to test pressure. The result of turning that control up and down is so minimal, simply leave it on high is my recommendation. (I'm retired from my own propane service business of over 25 years) I've seen many that did very little. Again, listen carefully, if the sound changes from min to max, it's making a difference.

** Notice the label states at the bottom; "removal of this label will void compliance". Codes require certification and testing labels to remain attached to the appliance. Removing any label looses the testing certification, so a tested appliance using UL standard testing criteria is no longer "Listed" which no longer allows it's use. Just like removing a Vin number from a vehicle, it is no longer legally usable. That tag should be attached with a metallic cable or wire (copper is better than nothing) to the appliance wrapped around and tightened on a screw. (stainless is used to avoid melting in a fire) The serial number is stamped into the metal instead of a sticker, also in case of fire. (codes require it to be stamped or engraved) **

Many manufacturers have gone to larger tags so you can see them better when lighting than a sticker applied on the appliance where it is hard to see.
thanks, helpful
Listened while turning the valve; heard nothing but I have old ears, probably high frequency loss.

wooduser suggested I adjust the valve. Since leaving on high is easier and we don't have a problem, I think will just leave on high.

Found a picture cable and tried to attach. Is really quite ugly. And all surfaces get quite hot. As in the manual, could attach underneath to the valve but then, when dusting, would be pushing the plate around; maybe break the valve. So, just fastened to leg of stove. Is good enough.

Thanks again for serious help.

IMG_2925.jpeg
 
Last edited:

old greybeard

New Member
Oct 29, 2018
27
PA
I have the same stove, a year older. Has been a great stove. My input valve also makes no noticeable difference, have just ran it on low since new. Have replaced 1 thermocouple in 25 years.