What stove is this?

fdgraham54

New Member
Jan 21, 2021
16
Roseburg Oregon
Hello Coaly - I'm not able to reach Camfan. Can you please give me more specific instructions?

Thank You!

Frank

Coaly - got a message back from Dollys Hearth in watkinsville. He or She messaged that he'll look for blower.

Yesterday I vacuumed the air control and made a fire. Shortly I realized there was a fire in the pipe so I shut off the air and doors. Fortunately it went out quickly. Moved the baffle and got some more creosote out by hitting the pipe with a stick again. Still burns slow and much slower with doors closed. I will get my Grandson to go up and check the spark arrester. If I take that nut off the air supply underneath will it come apart? I will also get my Grandson to look up from the stove to the to the damper to see what is there.

What else do you recommend we do?

Thank You!

Frank

Never had to take the slider apart.

I was under the impression you cleaned the chimney throughly. Obviously that is not the case if there was creosote in the pipe to burn. Take it apart and clean the pipe, look up the chimney to make sure it’s clean, and the spark screen is a part of regular chimney cleaning. Did you remove it, or take chimney sections apart to brush the chimney pipe? Seems a thorough chimney cleaning is in order first.

Coaly - got a message back from Dollys Hearth in watkinsville. He or She messaged that he'll look for blower.

Yesterday I vacuumed the air control and made a fire. Shortly I realized there was a fire in the pipe so I shut off the air and doors. Fortunately it went out quickly. Moved the baffle and got some more creosote out by hitting the pipe with a stick again. Still burns slow and much slower with doors closed. I will get my Grandson to go up and check the spark arrester. If I take that nut off the air supply underneath will it come apart? I will also get my Grandson to look up from the stove to the to the damper to see what is there.

What else do you recommend we do?

Thank You!

Frank
Never had to take the slider apart.

I was under the impression you cleaned the chimney throughly. Obviously that is not the case if there was creosote in the pipe to burn. Take it apart and clean the pipe, look up the chimney to make sure it’s clean, and the spark screen is a part of regular chimney cleaning. Did you remove it, or take chimney sections apart to brush the chimney pipe? Seems a thorough chimney cleaning is in order first.
Hi Coaly my grandson cleaned it . I don't go up on the roof any more unless it's urgent. AND the pipe got red right by the damper. Is that where the block likely is?

Thank You

Frank

Possibly. Do you have a thermometer on the single wall pipe inside?
You can tell if there is accumulation on the pipe by clapping your hands on it. It should sound hollow, not a dull heavy thump.

If there is creosote in the indoor pipe you are not burning hot enough. Keep temperature in the normal burn zone when smoke is present. The other reason for burning inside a pipe is an air leak into pipe when smoke is present and hot enough to ignite. That will glow right above the air leak due to adding oxygen to the preheated smoke particles causing secondary combustion in the pipe igniting any creosote present.

I would remove connector pipe to inspect and clean pipe sections as well as inspect chimney flue.
Make sure spark screen is clean if present.

Thank You Coaly That is exactly what I will do. I'll get back to you.

COALY - I found Dory's Hearth Home in Watkinsville

Coaly - connector pipe?? between stove and ceiling?

The damper is open AND the fire and vacuuming the air control helped a lot. As you suggested, I ordered a thermometer for the single wall pipe.

Hello Coaly - You mention the bucket with water to catch ash vacuumed up. I'd like to make one. Can you tell me how to set one up?

Thanks Frank

If you go here; https://www.hearth.com/talk/forums/fisher-stove-information-parts-history-and-more.28/ this is the main page of the Fisher Forum, you will find your original thread "What stove is this". Click on it, then scroll to bottom and reply at bottom so it continues on the same thread instead of starting a new thread each time you post.

I will merge this new thread into your old one.

Here's a video to give you an idea how to make a vacuum bucket that fine dust particles stay in the water without getting into vacuum.

Another similar system is here; Drywall-Sanding-Dust-CollectorSeperator
 

fdgraham54

New Member
Jan 21, 2021
16
Roseburg Oregon
Thanks for helping me navigate this web site I was having a hard time with it.

The dust collector looks great.

I never use the damper so any reason you can think of not to remove it and get it out of the way?

Frank
 

coaly

Fisher Moderator
Staff member
Dec 22, 2007
4,180
NE PA
If it hinders cleaning and you don’t use it, it’s fine to remove it. The larger Goldilocks similar to your stove came with a flue pipe damper that sat on the stove outlet. Inserts have a damper built in the top of the stove as well. It doesn’t interfere with cleaning and you still have a chimney control if you need it.
 

coaly

Fisher Moderator
Staff member
Dec 22, 2007
4,180
NE PA
When you get the pipe thermometer, put it on the pipe above damper where it doesn’t sense heat from the stove. Connector pipe is the stove pipe from stove to chimney.

The temperature graduations on the thermometer will show burning too cool zone, normal, and too hot. This is only for an indication while smoke is present. During the coaling stage there is no smoke, so temperature can go lower.

The object is keeping the temperature of internal chimney flue above 250* to the top. The thermometer will help you do that since the temperature ranges on it simulate the flue temperature near the top where it is cooler.
The actual flue gas temperature inside pipe is about twice the temp as shown on the thermometer. Exhaust gasses cool as it rises, hence the correct burn zone is shown to be above 250. Above the normal burn zone is wasting heat and fuel out the chimney.

Start the fire with air wide open. As thermometer approaches 250 close air about half way. As temp climbs, set air to keep pipe temp around 300 to 350. If too warm in home, close air but keep it around the 250 mark while smoke is present. If too warm, the stove is oversize for the home. If not enough heat, open air until nearing the hot zone. This is the maximum output for the stove. If still too cold in home the stove is undersized for the home. Putting the thermometer on the stove top gives you an idea of stove temperature but is not an indication of the creosote forming temperature, which it is made for.