What to expect with a gasification stove?

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Josh9676

New Member
Mar 21, 2021
3
Michigan
Hello all,

We are looking to purchase a gasification stove, most likely a crown royal 7400E series. We will be heating 2 houses (1600 square feet and 2000 square feet, not counting the full basements both sit on) as well as a 900 square foot 14 ' tall shop in our barn. We previously had a conventional outdoor boiler for about 22 years (Taylor) but we are intrigued by the new gasification style. We figure we have around 1.5 to 2 years worth of wood already cut and split for our old style boiler.

My question is what should we expect different from this stove to our old one? I know the wood will have to be significantly drier than it was previously (we always burned well seasoned wood anyways, no point in wasting all those BTUS to just burn the moisture off). What's the best size of splits for this style stove? Figuring it has a 32 inch firebox, should we be cutting to length or load 2 rows of 15 inch stuff in there? We could burn some decently large pieces in our old stove, anything you could really manage to lift and get in the door usually burned well (blocks maybe 1'×1'×28 inches long) would this be sufficient for this style stove or do the splits need to be smaller? Any other advice would be greatly appreciated as well! Thanks!
 

salecker

Minister of Fire
Aug 22, 2010
1,437
Northern Canada
Read search and read some more...
When i found this site i started to read and my short list of boilers got thrown out.
Between the mistake of the boiler i was going to buy,and the underground lines. iwould have had a system that probably would not have heated my house when real winter hits up here.
After spending the time reading and learning i have a heating system that has worked great for 11 years.If i had the time to devote to fine tuning my system i know i could probaly cut my wood consumption a bit.
 

E Yoder

Minister of Fire
Jan 27, 2017
555
Floyd, VA
I don't have experience with that particular model and every unit has its quirks.
But in general you'll have way less smoke than the Taylor, no boiling, and use half the wood.
I burn 4-8" diameter wood. Keep a 4-6-in bed of coals covering the nozzle. You'll loose your coal bed burning larger wood.
Maybe someone with experience with this specific unit will chime in.
 

Josh9676

New Member
Mar 21, 2021
3
Michigan
Read search and read some more...
When i found this site i started to read and my short list of boilers got thrown out.
Between the mistake of the boiler i was going to buy,and the underground lines. iwould have had a system that probably would not have heated my house when real winter hits up here.
After spending the time reading and learning i have a heating system that has worked great for 11 years.If i had the time to devote to fine tuning my system i know i could probaly cut my wood consumption a bit.

I have done a fair amount of research, the Crown Royal series of boilers seem to have fantastic reviews (we were going to get another Taylor before doing research). I plan on going with LOGSTOR piping after doing research on this page (we were going to go with the 5 wrap inside corrugated beforehand). I am open to any outdoor boiler suggestions, Crown Royal and Heatmaster seem to be the 1A. 1B. for feedback that I have seen anyways.
 

Josh9676

New Member
Mar 21, 2021
3
Michigan
I don't have experience with that particular model and every unit has its quirks.
But in general you'll have way less smoke than the Taylor, no boiling, and use half the wood.
I burn 4-8" diameter wood. Keep a 4-6-in bed of coals covering the nozzle. You'll loose your coal bed burning larger wood.
Maybe someone with experience with this specific unit will chime in.

Are you better off cutting that wood to the full length of the fire box or doing shorter splits?
 

Case1030

Feeling the Heat
Dec 12, 2017
363
Manitoba
Hello all,

We are looking to purchase a gasification stove, most likely a crown royal 7400E series. We will be heating 2 houses (1600 square feet and 2000 square feet, not counting the full basements both sit on) as well as a 900 square foot 14 ' tall shop in our barn. We previously had a conventional outdoor boiler for about 22 years (Taylor) but we are intrigued by the new gasification style. We figure we have around 1.5 to 2 years worth of wood already cut and split for our old style boiler.

My question is what should we expect different from this stove to our old one? I know the wood will have to be significantly drier than it was previously (we always burned well seasoned wood anyways, no point in wasting all those BTUS to just burn the moisture off). What's the best size of splits for this style stove? Figuring it has a 32 inch firebox, should we be cutting to length or load 2 rows of 15 inch stuff in there? We could burn some decently large pieces in our old stove, anything you could really manage to lift and get in the door usually burned well (blocks maybe 1'×1'×28 inches long) would this be sufficient for this style stove or do the splits need to be smaller? Any other advice would be greatly appreciated as well! Thanks!
To be 100% honest I have looked at all the gasification boilers in person and also owned a Heatmaster G100.

Crownroyal is a good boiler but it really turned me off where they cheap out on quality.

Using barn tin, fiberglass batt insulation is a rat/mouse nests waiting to happen... the selonoids burn out quite often, they don't use any reinforcement on their refactory nozzles, and the blower motors are cheap quality aswell. On a few posts guys actually are having trouble getting replacement this year (partially due to covid).

Now add those costs up after a few years cost of ownership goes up significantly.

Heatmaster makes an alright boiler aswell (I got a good deal on my old g100 used) but being that I have the boiler indoors the smoke spillage was to much for what I liked. And I felt the flue temps should have been lower and the heat exchanger was lacking efficiency.

Anyway earlier this month I sold the Heatmaster and upgraded to a Polar G2Plus. I am very happy so far. ECM Blower Motor, no electronics to go bad, middle ash cleanout/ignition Door. Extreamly Easy to clean, and the smoke extraction works perfectly. They have a proven design.

Last I heard the G3 is EPA 2020 approved and qualifies for the tax credit. The G2plus efficiency will be updated shortly aswell to 83%. Which will also meet the tax credit. Very impressive considering they have used similar design since 2010.
 

salecker

Minister of Fire
Aug 22, 2010
1,437
Northern Canada
In 10 years reading i haven't seen much on Crown Royals in here
hopefully you read the sticky on underground lines.
 
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Case1030

Feeling the Heat
Dec 12, 2017
363
Manitoba
I stumbled upon this video that shows the Polar G2Plus nozzle. I believe he has been running it for over 4 years if I remember from one of his last videos.

Very well built unit. They thought of everything.

 
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chew72

Member
Oct 27, 2009
82
NS, Canada
I stumbled upon this video that shows the Polar G2Plus nozzle. I believe he has been running it for over 4 years if I remember from one of his last videos.

Very well built unit. They thought of everything.

For anyone interested in knowing for all intents and purposes I think you could call that a froling. Once the view was inside I could not tell the difference between the that boiler and my boiler. Does anyone know if they are the same guts, and are just adding their own shell to it?

Also I have logstor my self. It's great pipe. What size were you planning on installing? And what kind of flow do you think you will need for a boiler that size.
 
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chew72

Member
Oct 27, 2009
82
NS, Canada
Interesting I may have answered my own question. They do look almost identical on the inside however on the spec sheet they hold significantly more water so they must be different units. That design however is exactly the same.
 
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Case1030

Feeling the Heat
Dec 12, 2017
363
Manitoba
For anyone interested in knowing for all intents and purposes I think you could call that a froling. Once the view was inside I could not tell the difference between the that boiler and my boiler. Does anyone know if they are the same guts, and are just adding their own shell to it?

Also I have logstor my self. It's great pipe. What size were you planning on installing? And what kind of flow do you think you will need for a boiler that size.
Yes that's true. They took a proven European design and made it into a rugged North American outdoor/indoor downdraft boiler. Far as I know they were the first to do that... Also the increased water jacket acts as a buffer.

They come with a EZ-connect manifold on the back that accepts 3- 1" lines (supply and return) and has a boiler return protection aswell with a mixing pump to prevent stratification that all comes factory.

+1 on the Logstor underground pipe. Really good quality.

ezconnect-1-1.jpg