Will I need a damper?

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Rob_Red

Member
Feb 2, 2021
128
Southern New England
Hey all, I am nearing the end of my new chimney saga and I am wondering if I should consider a damper for my setup. I will have about 25 ft of class A going through the wall horizontally with a T. From there I will have about 3 feet of stove pipe with a 45 degree bend going into the wall. Since I'm kind of going "all out" I am thinking about going with double wall stove connector pipe.

My prior setup which was just a clay liner and single wall connector pipe drafted like a monster. I would assume this would draft at least as well so should I just go ahead an add the damper right away? I burnt all winter with the prior setup and may have had over draft? But I'm not quite sure what to look for there.

the stove is a Hearth Stone green mountain 40

Also are there any other things I should consider now for a rock solid setup while I have the checkbook open?
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
87,665
South Puget Sound, WA
Yes, if a damper section is to be added get the Ventis 6" section that has the damper in it.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
24,177
central pa
I figured as much. Thanks begreen

This coming season I want to really dial in long burn times. I have never used a damper but the idea is intriguing to me.
You will be just reducing the draft on your stove to where it should be
 

kennyp2339

Minister of Fire
Feb 16, 2014
5,760
07462
The decent thing will be stove function at a slower draft (at the stove) that can be adjusted through out the season, might be a good idea to go ahead and purchase a manometer & probe thermometer - full send geek mode.
 

Rob_Red

Member
Feb 2, 2021
128
Southern New England
The decent thing will be stove function at a slower draft (at the stove) that can be adjusted through out the season, might be a good idea to go ahead and purchase a manometer & probe thermometer - full send geek mode.

I like the way you think

The manometer requires piercing the stove pipe correct? I wouldn't want a bunch of probes hanging off the stove full time (its the center piece of our living room). Do you know of a slick way to use the manometer to get some baseline information and then plug the hole?
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
24,177
central pa
I like the way you think

The manometer requires piercing the stove pipe correct? I wouldn't want a bunch of probes hanging off the stove full time (its the center piece of our living room). Do you know of a slick way to use the manometer to get some baseline information and then plug the hole?
Use the thermometer probe hole for the manometer
 

kennyp2339

Minister of Fire
Feb 16, 2014
5,760
07462
Do you know of a slick way to use the manometer to get some baseline information and then plug the hole?
Sorry I wasnt able to get back to you earlier, but like what Bholler said, you make 1 hole on the stove pipe, about 12" above the flue collar, before you install your probe thermometer you run the manometer to get an idea of what your stove is doing internally, after you learn the stove you trade out the manometer and install the probe thermometer. Dwyer makes a great meter, the probe can stay in the pipe for all burns (but I suspect the tip needs to be cleaned after a while) they aren't very expensive either and I think its close to the same size hole for a probe thermometer to.