Wood burning stove in basement

bigbacon

New Member
Feb 21, 2021
14
VA
2000 literature says 2.4cuft box.

3000 is a lot more money as well.

2000 can be shipped to me for under 2600 bucks.
 

john26

Feeling the Heat
Oct 27, 2008
463
Wildwood MO

bigbacon

New Member
Feb 21, 2021
14
VA
Check epa's site they have actual useable firebox size listed. I have one stove listed a t 2.9cuft but I can pack more wood in the one listed at 2.3cuft because of its square design. 3500 can be bought online for $2619 may check local dealers as well
my problem is finding the things online where you can A: get a price and B: actually purchase it.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
86,564
South Puget Sound, WA

bigbacon

New Member
Feb 21, 2021
14
VA
last question I have is, in reality how well do these things heat a 2 story home, well, contribute to heating a 2 story home? I should draw a floor plan so you can see what I am dealing with.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
86,564
South Puget Sound, WA
edit: found on that site, sorry.

2000 I can find on woodlanddirect.com or efireplace.com. Are either of those decent places?
Yes
 

Caw

Minister of Fire
May 26, 2020
671
Massachusetts
last question I have is, in reality how well do these things heat a 2 story home, well, contribute to heating a 2 story home? I should draw a floor plan so you can see what I am dealing with.
As I outlined earlier, they do quite well if the floor plan cooperates. There just needs to be a way for the air to move. Heres the layout of my 1600 sq foot two story cape.

My Osburn 1600 is in the 1st floor living room and as you can see the stairwell to the 2nd floor is in that room so upstairs stays nice and warm naturally. I use a single raised tower fan to push air down my hallway to the kitchen, dining room, and family room. The stove sucks the cold air back along the floor/up from the basement for combustion. You can feel it moving if you have bare feet.

On a 20 degree day a typical temperature picture of my place would be:

Living room (stove room) - 75
Upstairs bedrooms - 70
Family Room - 70
Kitchen/dining room - 65
Basement - unheated, 45 degrees ish.

I could make it warmer but we like it a little on the cooler side. Today was warm, 45 degrees or so. It's 36 degrees now, I haven't touched my stove since 7 am and it's between 68-70 in the entire house. I wouldn't say my house is super tight but we have above average insulation.

Screenshot_20210223-201202_Chrome.jpg
 

bigbacon

New Member
Feb 21, 2021
14
VA
ill try to come up with a guestimate floor plan.

I guess I'm more wondering about the first floor because the room where the fireplace is opens up into the foyer which is completely open up to the second floor. I'm wondering how we would get the air into the rest of the lower floor.

either that or I don't quite grasp how these heat and move air.
 

Caw

Minister of Fire
May 26, 2020
671
Massachusetts
Give us a sketch and we can see what you're working with. A real estate listing might have an official layout like the one I just showed you.

For the most part you can figure out ways to make it work if you have good insulation and an appropriately sized stove. Like in my case I'm able to heat the kitchen/dining room/family room even though there's only a small doorway and lots of walls in the way.

My tower fan is actually in the living room raised on an end table and it blows air into the family room. Then that air naturally heads over to the kitchen/dining room plus we walk around there a lot stirring up the air. The cold air returns along the floor and the stove also gets air from the basement thru the registers and gap in the basement door.

The tower fan is a little annoying as it's kind of an eyesore but it makes the heating plan work, it's quiet, and it cost like $30. Much easier than cutting holes in walls for anything fancier. If I turn the fan off upstairs will get noticeably warmer and the far downstairs rooms colder.

Here's the fan as viewed from the family room:

20210223_203142.jpg
 
Last edited by a moderator:

bigbacon

New Member
Feb 21, 2021
14
VA
Here is a very poor drawing. The upstairs isnt as big of a deal over the first floor but the open foyer i suspect means most of the heat will end up there which at least the master bedroom we dont want. We like it cold when sleeping. Thermostat upstairs from 10pm ro 6am is 59F

20210224_103509.jpg