wood furnace vs stove

tjcole50 Posted By tjcole50, Feb 22, 2015 at 11:48 PM

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  1. tjcole50

    tjcole50
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    I have asked before but looking for more opinions. Described in previous threads is my house layout and trying to utilize my existing masonry chimney + liner as opposed to install in a new exterior chimney.
    I am thinking of useing an add on wood furnace like stove and directing heat to opposite ends useing the 2 8" openings on the furnace dumping into finished basement. I am between the drolet tundra and drolet ht2000. Question is will a tundra push out a more noticeable heat load as compared to a free standing ht200/nc30. Or would there not be a noticeable difference between the two? I could always use the tundra as a large stove and later when funds permit install an exterior class A over by my lp furmace to tie in. Current chimney is center of the house exterior chimney. 10 ft from a wide open stair case to open layout upstairs
     
  2. Fsappo

    Fsappo
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    Compare the CFMs of the fans and the firebox sizes for heat output and air movement. That's what I would look at.
     
  3. begreen

    begreen
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    If you get a conventional stove the question is how is the heat going to get upstairs. If the stairway and chimney are at one end of the house and the bedrooms are at the other end, getting heat to the far end is going to be much easier with a furnace. On the other hand, if the stairway is open with a large door and the chimney + stove are centrally located nearby and the upstairs floorplan is open, then the stove downstairs may do a fine job. It also depends on how the basement is insulated and how it's going to be used.

    A wood stove will likely make it hotter down there where a ducted furnace will deliver more of its heat to where it's wanted. The stove is a local area heater. If the basement is finished, insulated and partitioned it may get quite hot down there in the stove room. Some folks like that, others don't.

    A furnace is a convective heat distribution system. If you put in the furnace I would invest in some round pipe, fittings and registers to deliver the majority of the heat upstairs at opposite parts of the first floor.
     
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  4. Highbeam

    Highbeam
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    The NC30 is about 3.5 CF and the blower, the big one, only blows at 100CFM with no convection deck to guide that CFM in contact with the heated part of the stove. For the sake of producing hot air, a furnace of the same or larger size will make more hot air and allow you to produce more btu since the much larger blower system is so good at keeping the firebox cool.
     
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  5. tjcole50

    tjcole50
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    No ductwork will be used with the furnsce. The 2 8" outlets will just have a section of duct with a 90 degree angle pointing the sir in the most desired direction. House is very squared layout not like a ranch with a long hallway. My bedrooms all sHare outside walls of the living room
     
  6. begreen

    begreen
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    I would lean toward the stove if the intent is to never duct the furnace and the stove location is central. The stove is quieter and has a better fire view. It will also run a bit better with a partial load of fuel. Most furnaces work best when it's cold outside and they can burn vigorously. They are not great for milder weather burning.
     
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  7. tjcole50

    tjcole50
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    What if you had an nc30 upstairs that does a fine job on warmer days? Directing and extra hp of a furmace worth added cost?
     
  8. begreen

    begreen
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    In that case I really don't see the advantage of the furnace unless the basement is partitioned into rooms and one wants to duct heat into those spaces. That doesn't sound like the case here. If the intent is just to heat the basement a smaller 2 cu ft stove might even do the job well.

    PS: Can you add your current stove(s) to your signature line?
     
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  9. tjcole50

    tjcole50
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    I have an nc30 upstairs. During 10 F and below it gets a workout. I would like something in the basement I could run 24/7 and the upstairs nc30 would only get run for extra push.
     
  10. nyny

    nyny
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    i had that setup onetime with an old clayton furnace and a big elbow out the top blower. it worked fantastic. was in the basement and it blew the heat up the stairs. basement was 90degrees and the house was warm. the big blower gets noisy but it didnt run all the time. think the box was about 7 cubic feet. us stove still makes a comparable model
     
  11. tjcole50

    tjcole50
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    My house layout is simple open and no long hallways to reach to. How well did your farther rooms feel?
     
  12. tjcole50

    tjcole50
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    Wife has agreed to use a furmace as a stove in our existing chimney in basement. Going to put a small stove down there anyway for ambience down the road so no loss on a liner being installed. Now I'm between a drolet tundra or a yukon super jack. Any opinions on those two
     
  13. begreen

    begreen
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    Try starting a new thread in the boiler room on the topic. There are furnace owners there that can give you a good perspective.
     
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