Wood ID please

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sweedish

Feeling the Heat
Feb 6, 2019
318
Michigan
Trying to figure out what kind of wood this is. Was already dead and bark falling off when I cut it up. Not boxelder, ash, maple, paper birch or aspen. Its dry, and still quite dense, more so than cherry. Thoughts?

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gzecc

Minister of Fire
Sep 24, 2008
4,940
NNJ
Need more pictures of other angles and parts and different distances. Split too
 

Corey

Minister of Fire
Nov 19, 2005
2,696
Midwest
The first thought that hit my mind was 'elm' - I don't know why...but that is what that grayish moldy/mossy bark reminds me of.

Looking closer, guess I'm sort of losing all sense of scale... I see 5-6 growth rings in what I take to be a 6-8 inch diameter log... so I'm thinking one of those must be off by a fair amount. Often times the bark on a small branch won't look like the 'familiar' bark on the trunk of a tree, so that also throws things off. If it really is growing an inch a year, possibly some sort of ornamental tree? Possibly poplar?
 

Osage

Feeling the Heat
Nov 3, 2011
330
kansas
Bark looks like black locust.
 

Corey

Minister of Fire
Nov 19, 2005
2,696
Midwest
Wow. Yeah, trying to think of what could grow that fast, that far north. Willow, poplar, aspen, possibly some evergreens... though you say not aspen, and it doesn't look like an evergreen.
 

hickoryhoarder

Minister of Fire
Apr 5, 2013
726
Indiana
Bark looks a little like pignut hickory. Got a photo of a split? Stringy wood would suggest hickory.
 

sweedish

Feeling the Heat
Feb 6, 2019
318
Michigan
Didn’t split very easy, not straight grain. This was growing along a ditch, and had 25 years ago+ been pushed into a pile. No signs of being punky or any other rot. Bark mostly off of the pieces, so I can’t really compare to a living tree to use an app.

D40FE94B-2C65-4182-AF4D-865B46D5A4F4.jpeg 853EF44F-DCE2-4B4A-97B8-DD939C656CA1.jpeg 18C39C49-259F-4F75-9036-4D8E8835710B.jpeg 99393227-BC57-4DAE-BC2E-8FF4FFFA45BC.jpeg 37CF03A6-6DEF-4F76-B5AB-69712AE7D816.jpeg
 

sweedish

Feeling the Heat
Feb 6, 2019
318
Michigan
Didn’t split very easy, not straight grain. This was growing along a ditch, and had 25 years ago+ been pushed into a pile. No signs of being punky or any other rot. Bark mostly off of the pieces, so I can’t really compare to a living tree to use an app.

View attachment 287367 View attachment 287368 View attachment 287369 View attachment 287370 View attachment 287371
Sorry, accidentally uploaded an unrelated picture of a 4 point I saw during hunting season
 

gzecc

Minister of Fire
Sep 24, 2008
4,940
NNJ
Too far gone for me to ID. Leaning towards some weed gone wild with those huge growth rings.
 

hickoryhoarder

Minister of Fire
Apr 5, 2013
726
Indiana
Those additional photos were pretty good. And I'm now pretty much stumped.
 

sweedish

Feeling the Heat
Feb 6, 2019
318
Michigan
It’s very dense, like applewood. So maybe it is locust? Does locust split like ash? This was intertwined grain and it’s closed pore, that’s what had me confused is that it’s so dense but it looks like it grew very fast, and I don’t remember seeing pods from other locust trees, but maybe I missed them.
 

sweedish

Feeling the Heat
Feb 6, 2019
318
Michigan
It’s very dense, like applewood. So maybe it is locust? Does locust split like ash? This was intertwined grain and it’s closed pore, that’s what had me confused is that it’s so dense but it looks like it grew very fast, and I don’t remember seeing pods from other locust trees, but maybe I missed them.
If it is locust, lucky me, I have 15 ish pieces of premium firewood.
 

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
4,521
Long Island NY
If it's that dry, burn it and tell us how it goes, how it smells etc. Nice puzzle ..
 

weatherguy

Minister of Fire
Feb 20, 2009
5,893
Central Mass
Bark looks like locust and if lasted that long down that's a good indication.
 
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gzecc

Minister of Fire
Sep 24, 2008
4,940
NNJ
No locust that I've seen in the northeast.
 
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bigealta

Minister of Fire
May 22, 2010
773
Utah, NJ
Does not look like locust from here in NJ, but burn it and if it smells Very funky than that’s the unmistakable sign it is locust.

Locust bark is also very distinctive, pull it off, if it is thick and stinks when burned that’ s a good sign it’s locust.

Take a pic of a piece of bark removed and show both the inside and outside. It’s pretty easy to tell if it’s locust bark.
 
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Corey

Minister of Fire
Nov 19, 2005
2,696
Midwest
Definitely interesting puzzle. If it turns out to be 'good' wood, we need to definitely identify, because I want some!! With a growth rate like that, you could almost plant in the spring and harvest wood in the fall! You aren't downstream from any nuclear power plants are you??
 

Osage

Feeling the Heat
Nov 3, 2011
330
kansas
Black locust produces it's own nitrogen, and actually grows rather fast. I planted a small sapling I dug 4 years ago and it is now about 15' tall with a 3" trunk. Around here we have groves of them that were planted for fence posts. You can get good line posts in about 5 yrs.
Still looks like black locust to me.