Wood Stove for 1400 sq/ft ranch home

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PDutro

New Member
Sep 26, 2021
33
Oregon
I am preparing to tear out an old defunct pre-fab fireplace and construct an alcove in the same spot for a wood stove.

I’ll probably have an alcove depth around 28”, width around 58”, and can have the height as tall as our 90” ceilings if necessary.

House is late 1970’s (popcorn ceilings!) 1440 sq/feet, and the alcove would be about in the center of the house, and in line with the hallway to the bedrooms.

The stove would serve as a nice supplement during winter, ambiance for evenings and holiday fires, and a backup heat source for power outages (Oregon winters don’t get much below 20 degrees F for long).

I’m looking at these models:

Regency f1150, f1500, f2400
Osburn inspire 2000

My concern is that the f1150 & f1500 wouldn’t keep the whole house warm enough if we were to rely on it for an extended power outage (both rated for “up to 1200 sq/ft”), but that the f2400 might be too much heater and/or would extend into the room 7 or 8 inches (not that that’s a big deal).

The Osburn looks great, my wife would probably prefer the look of it, and it would technically fit the alcove a little better, but how would it perform compared to the f2400 (both comparable in s/ft rating)?

Thanks
 

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
1,973
Long Island NY
I can't help you with those stoves, but please have the chimney inspected by a professional before you hook up something new. You may end up paying as much for that part as you do for the stove itself.

The good part is that if you by a stove eligible for the 26% tax credit, the cost of that (install, chimney etc) also qualify for the credit.
 

PDutro

New Member
Sep 26, 2021
33
Oregon
I can't help you with those stoves, but please have the chimney inspected by a professional before you hook up something new. You may end up paying as much for that part as you do for the stove itself.

The good part is that if you by a stove eligible for the 26% tax credit, the cost of that (install, chimney etc) also qualify for the credit.
Yes, I am already anticipating having a class A chimney flue installed up through the chase. I’m expecting the project to cost between $8-$10k all said and done, with me and my father-in-law doing the demo and alcove build.
 
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EbS-P

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2019
1,490
SE North Carolina
Yes, I am already anticipating having a class A chimney flue installed up through the chase. I’m expecting the project to cost between $8-$10k all said and done, with me and my father-in-law doing the demo and alcove build.
Just pick a stove before you build it out. That way you know exactly what clearances you need to build too.
 

PDutro

New Member
Sep 26, 2021
33
Oregon
Just pick a stove before you build it out. That way you know exactly what clearances you need to build too.
Yes, that was the question from my original post. I’m looking for input about 4 specific models and how they would perform in my 1400 sq/ft house.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
90,631
South Puget Sound, WA
How well they will perform depends on several factors, most notably the wood quality (including dryness), the draft, the area actually heated, and the operator. It will also depend on how hot one likes the house to be.

How large of an area is open to the stove location? That is no doorways. Large 6'+ wide passage ways may be ok.

The F1150 may be a bit undersized if the goal is to solely heat with wood, but it would be ok for supplemental heat. The F1500 is a little bit larger and has a cat so it will provide longer burns and should cover most of the heating needs. Still, don't expect miracles from a 1.3 cu ft firebox. The F2450 will likely be the best fit. It may be a bit oversized, for 45º nights so judgement will need to be used, but could be fine on 30º nights. The Osburn 2000 is a little larger, so the same general idea as the F2450.

A good fit for the climate and that location would be the Jotul F45 or the PE Super or PE Alderlea T5.
 
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bluemtwood

New Member
Jan 19, 2021
7
NE Oregon
Yes, that was the question from my original post. I’m looking for input about 4 specific models and how they would perform in my 1400 sq/ft house.
I have a f2400 centrally located in a 1500sf open floorplan 50's ranch in NE Oregon. I use it primarily on evenings and weekends when I am around to enjoy it. It works quite well in my situation for heating and is easy to use. Anything smaller wouldn't work. Only thing I'd (will) change is raising the hearth 8"-9" so I don't have to get on my knees to load/reload.
 
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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
90,631
South Puget Sound, WA
It's a good and easy to run stove.
There can be a large difference between Eastern and Western Oregon winter temps. What are your typical night time temperatures in January?
 

PDutro

New Member
Sep 26, 2021
33
Oregon
It's a good and easy to run stove.
There can be a large difference between Eastern and Western Oregon winter temps. What are your typical night time temperatures in January?
If you’re asking me, typically stays above freezing except for short durations, though we have had some cold spells.

It’s difficult not having the alcove built yet to k ow the exact dimensions I’ll have to work with, but it looks like I could easily get either a regency f2450 or f2500 in with a bit of room to spare (for clearance to combustibles), or a Blaze King Sirocco SC30.

Each of those models would have the front 6” of the stove standing out front of the alcove opening, but I don’t think that’s a problem aesthetically and sounds like it’s pretty common.

I’m inclined to get one of those over the 1150 or 1500 because I’d rather be able to warm the house a little too much than not enough.
 

bluemtwood

New Member
Jan 19, 2021
7
NE Oregon
It's a good and easy to run stove.
There can be a large difference between Eastern and Western Oregon winter temps. What are your typical night time temperatures in January?
If you're asking me, it's usually low 20's but can drop to 0 for short spells in NE Oregon. As mentioned earlier there are tons of variables specific to each situation which will determine how well a stove works and the F2400 is a good fit for me. In fact, I replaced an older BK with it as an experiment and found that I like the tube stove better because it heats more like the old school wood stoves I grew up with and fits my lifestyle better.