Yardworks Electric Log Splitter issue

rjedmunds

New Member
Oct 2, 2017
1
Canada
Hi Everyone - this seems to be the most knowledgeable bunch of people around when it comes to log splitters, so really hoping someone here can help. About 2 weeks ago we purchased a 5 Ton Electric Log Splitter from Canadian Tire. The plan was to use this to split 3 cords of birch wood we had purchased, the logs were already split but most were way too big and wet to burn in our woodstove. The first day my husband ran the log splitter for probably about 6 hours or so without any issue. The second day was about the same but by the end of the day the hydraulic sliding part on the splitter slowed down noticeably and by the end of the day didn't move at all when the button was pushed. The motor runs fine, doesn't stall or make any strange noises. Checked the hydraulic oil and that is fine. So this morning we took the splitter back to Canadian Tire where they reluctantly exchanged it for a new one (same brand/model). We took the new one home, set it up and continued splitting wood....but again after about 3-4 hours the hydraulic part stopped moving. We called the 1-800 number that is on the manual and they said we were lucky enough to get a faulty one twice. I somehow doubt this is the issue. We called the two numbers that Canadian Tire provided as their repair centers for these machines and they said to bring it in and that we may be running it for too long.

Any know how long we should be able to run these electric log splitters. I know they are no commercial ones and intended to be used for all day, but I'm sure they should be able to be used for a few hours at a time at least. Any one have this type of issue? or find that they can only run these for small lengths of time?

Thanks!!
 

Jags

Moderate Moderator
Staff member
Aug 2, 2006
18,123
Northern IL
Just a thought, but with the small amount of hydro juice these things have in reserve, you could be dealing with a heat issue during the longer duration runs. My personal opinion is that they should be able to handle that. It will be interesting to find out what the actual failure is on the machine when it gets repaired.

I don't recall any run time limits in the instructions. That tells me there isn't one. Read the manual for that machine (it is different than mine) and make sure they don't specify one. That way when the repair shop tries to tell you that you ran it too long, you have background knowledge to plead your case.
 

Jan Pijpelink

Minister of Fire
Jan 2, 2015
1,827
South Jersey
There is a hydraulic fluid bleed screw on these splitters. This MUST be opened a few turns before running the splitter and closed after operation. Many people forget to do this. If not opened, it will damage the splitter. Have you turned the bleed screw open?
 

GadDummit

Burning Hunk
May 27, 2017
195
Oklahoma
There is a hydraulic fluid bleed screw on these splitters. This MUST be opened a few turns before running the splitter and closed after operation. Many people forget to do this. If not opened, it will damage the splitter. Have you turned the bleed screw open?

^^^^^This! If you don't loosen the bleed screw (stupid little plastic thing that likes to break off) it'll starve itself for fluid after a few hours of use. I ran one of these for a season before it ticked me off so much I upgraded to a gas powered splitter. If your husband is handy he can put a splitter together himself for next year's work and save his own soul from the amount of swearing he'll get to skip.

Actually for the single bunch of birch you're splitting I might just go rent a splitter for $45.00 from the local place and use the heck out of it, then take it back and be done.
 

VirginiaIron

Minister of Fire
Dec 19, 2013
1,068
Central Virginia
I'm sorry to hear of your troubles.
Is this model the yardworks duo cut 5 ton electric?
https://m.canadiantire.ca/products/productDetail/0603895P/false/false/false

The bleed screw #12 is identified on Page # 3 and the clear warning is located on page 5. They may not return/exchange it due to the clear warning, but honey catches more flies than vinegar. A manual from a similar model from northern tool indicates the bleed screw should be opened.

https://www.manualslib.com/manual/917565/Yardworks-060-3895-8.html?page=5#manual

The add from CT said $549 for this model, if you can, I'd try to return it, purchase a maul, and save your $$$ for a future gas model.
Edit: my search for a 5 ton electric unit from CT only produced one result shown above. My Yardworks manual in PDF search for a 5 ton YW unit produced one result shown above.
Pg 9 -13f to 130f ambient operating temp range, and a 5 second compression limit if the log doesn't split-pg 10.
Page 10 I nearly fainted at the sight of the operating position. This would seem hard to endure for long periods.
 
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VirginiaIron

Minister of Fire
Dec 19, 2013
1,068
Central Virginia
Furthermore..., the manufacturer should know that Canadians and Americans are very similar. Who reads manuals anymore? I usually do, but even the NWO friendly communication diagrams would have a Gigantic "loosen this screw" diagram in the manual if it meant catistrophic seal failure. Also, why wouldn't the manufacturer have yellow or red tape attached to the screw/area if it was so important-just as important as an engine being shipped dry?
 

WoodyIsGoody

Minister of Fire
Jan 16, 2017
1,437
Pacific NW Washington
Owner's Manual, good read.
 
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VirginiaIron

Minister of Fire
Dec 19, 2013
1,068
Central Virginia
Owner's Manual, good read.
Until you get to page 10 where I nearly got the ghost scared out of me when I see the diagram indicating the recommended operators position.
 

Montanalocal

Feeling the Heat
Dec 22, 2014
377
Helena MT
Those little 5 ton models with their hydraulic cylinders enclosed under the splitting area have a design flaw. I used to have one like it, a DR. The problem is that they have an internal hydraulic gasket that wears out, and is almost impossible to find, and a real pain to replace. I spent several days trying to replace mine the first time it went out and the unit lost power. After the replacement failed a short time later, I gave up and purchased a regular type splitter with an ordinary exposed hydraulic cylinder, powered with an electric motor. They do exist.
 
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WoodyIsGoody

Minister of Fire
Jan 16, 2017
1,437
Pacific NW Washington
Those little 5 ton models with their hydraulic cylinders enclosed under the splitting area have a design flaw. I used to have one like it, a DR. The problem is that they have an internal hydraulic gasket that wears out, and is almost impossible to find, and a real pain to replace. I spent several days trying to replace mine the first time it went out and the unit lost power. After the replacement failed a short time later, I gave up and purchased a regular type splitter with an ordinary exposed hydraulic cylinder, powered with an electric motor. They do exist.
That's probably the internal seal the Owner's Manual warns could be damaged if the vent cap is not loosened before operation.
 
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jetsam

Minister of Fire
Dec 12, 2015
4,720
Long Island, NY
youtu.be
Image463797082.jpg


"Using a large mallet, strike your fondling hand repeatedly until it stops uncontrollably caressing the motor and moves away from the splitter, dangling in a broken arc."

(Next picture: "Use your mallet hand to drive yourself to the hospital. For safety, put the mallet down first.")
 

bunfoolio

Member
Mar 13, 2015
72
merrimac, ma
Hi Everyone - this seems to be the most knowledgeable bunch of people around when it comes to log splitters, so really hoping someone here can help. About 2 weeks ago we purchased a 5 Ton Electric Log Splitter from Canadian Tire. The plan was to use this to split 3 cords of birch wood we had purchased, the logs were already split but most were way too big and wet to burn in our woodstove. The first day my husband ran the log splitter for probably about 6 hours or so without any issue. The second day was about the same but by the end of the day the hydraulic sliding part on the splitter slowed down noticeably and by the end of the day didn't move at all when the button was pushed. The motor runs fine, doesn't stall or make any strange noises. Checked the hydraulic oil and that is fine. So this morning we took the splitter back to Canadian Tire where they reluctantly exchanged it for a new one (same brand/model). We took the new one home, set it up and continued splitting wood....but again after about 3-4 hours the hydraulic part stopped moving. We called the 1-800 number that is on the manual and they said we were lucky enough to get a faulty one twice. I somehow doubt this is the issue. We called the two numbers that Canadian Tire provided as their repair centers for these machines and they said to bring it in and that we may be running it for too long.

Any know how long we should be able to run these electric log splitters. I know they are no commercial ones and intended to be used for all day, but I'm sure they should be able to be used for a few hours at a time at least. Any one have this type of issue? or find that they can only run these for small lengths of time?

Thanks!!

I have an electric log splitter and there are three small things that can affect performance so please cheek them

1) Turn the bleed screw
2) It must but put on and used on a flat level surface. Mine will not work on a slight angle
3) Quality extension cord must be used. If you are running 100feet and it is thick as a pencil not good enough.

My 5 ton homelite is great so good luck and I hope you get the issue resolved.
 

VirginiaIron

Minister of Fire
Dec 19, 2013
1,068
Central Virginia
Did you get this all worked out?
 
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