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  1. wkpoor

    wkpoor Minister of Fire

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    Thats what it says on the brochure in low burn mode. Got to thinking about that number. Yes quite impressive. But how many of you have really thought about how much your stove actually uses. I know I don't burn 80lbs in that amount of time on high burn. Difference is I don't load it in all at once. Since I'm sure thats only possible on the very best of wood perfectly dry I can only imagine or compare to how far I can go on 80lbs of Ecobricks. For me 4 bricks (half pack) (10lbs) will last 10hrs. So 2 full packs doing the math would equal 40lbs/40hrs. Now add in a few splits, and I do mean a few, that are typically maple for me or very dry Elm that is feather light there is no way I would get to the 80lb number. So when you really get down to it, its the ability to burn slow enough to load it in all at once. But in reality probably anyone can have that same performance at little bit at a time. Last night I loaded in 4 bricks and 4 splits. 10hrs later stove was 300 degrees. Starting temp was 750.
    I would be curious to know if 80lbs of the bricks were loaded in at one time how far the King could go. I have yet to even load in a whole pack at once (would fell like I'm wasting them). Most I've done is half pack. I started out putting in 2, then 3, then 4 for over niter. I mostly use them as energy pills for existing firewood.

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  2. markinpdx

    markinpdx New Member

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    I think the key would be whether a stove could take a full load of ecobricks and burn them slowly and steadily and getting the energy out of the smoke (cat) as it does so. Many stoves would go pretty hot or if damped down to avoid it, might choke. Interesting to try an experiment!
  3. jeff_t

    jeff_t Minister of Fire

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    Hmmm. I'll volunteer if I can find some. TSC is the only place I've seen them around here, and I'm sure they're way into gardening season now.

    There isn't a whole lot of magic in a really big firebox with really good control of the air going into it. From what I've seen, the thermostat doesn't do much regulating, it's just a knob to turn instead of a handle to slide.
  4. rdust

    rdust Minister of Fire

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    I think most people who own them know that 80lbs is a big load of wood. The key to these stove is the convenience and fiddle free operating they provide. Dealing with it once a day(less for the King users) when it's warmer is a huge bonus instead of building multiple little fires to not overheat the house.
  5. rdust

    rdust Minister of Fire

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    Yep, for low burn the t-stat doesn't do a thing! I think the key is BK has a really good handle on the air flow going into these stoves.
  6. HotCoals

    HotCoals Minister of Fire

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    Supposedly the eco bricks have 2.5 times the punch of the same weight in hardwood..I dunno.
    I have burned eco bricks plying around and I don't think I could get 10 hours of good heat from 4 of them..nope.
  7. wkpoor

    wkpoor Minister of Fire

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    Not sure about the claimed and doubt 2.5xs but maybe 2xs at most. I guess the best way to tell is just plain put in the same weight wood ignoring volume. I can't run that test since I don't have good dry hardwood this year. What I do have dry has lost some of its caloric value. Were not talking good heat here though. A 40hr burn on the King is a low burn and from what I've read that means about 3-400 stove top.
  8. SmokeyCity

    SmokeyCity Feeling the Heat

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    I am VERY interested to see what Elvis can do with a stuff full load of ECO BRICKS. Id bet you can go more than 40 if you get the settings just right.
  9. jeff_t

    jeff_t Minister of Fire

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    I'll have to wait for some milder weather. My heat addicted family won't survive that long at a low burn with the current temps.
  10. troydennis2

    troydennis2 New Member

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    Northshore MA
    I'd like to add my opinion on the eco bricks after burning 3 tons of them over the past year. The claim is that they have 2X the output of seasoned hardwood. The truth is that compressed hardwood sawdust (eco bricks) has 8000 BTU per pound, which is the same as seasoned hardwood splits. So 2000 pounds (1 ton) of eco bricks has about 2/3 of the heating potential of a 3000 pound cord of wood.

    They aren't made of some magical material only wood and my NC-30 needs approx 7 pounds of them every hour to hover at 500 degrees. Which at my cost in the Boston area is 1 buck an hour.
  11. wkpoor

    wkpoor Minister of Fire

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    Well since they are more dense than hardwood I could be made to believe they have at least a few more BTUs in them over cord wood. Were you able to make them burn well for overnighters. Can't say how much it would take to hover at 500 for me as I just put some in and come back several hours later to see what I end up with. Most stoves will probably hold temp for a good while in the 300-400 degree range but that magical 500 takes some muscle to stay there. At 700+ in any stuff you had better be prepared to feed it more often. I usually let it go to 700 and above before I throttle back for a slow ride down.
  12. rdust

    rdust Minister of Fire

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    I've always been curious how long the Princess would stay above 500 but I've never needed to push it that hard so I haven't. Maybe next winter I'll have that kind of demand so I can find out.

    If you get a stove in the living area I think you'll find you don't need the magical 500 number too often to maintain a steady temp.
  13. weatherguy

    weatherguy Minister of Fire

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    Wheres the best spot for a therm on the princess? I usually just go by the cat thermo but Im going to attach another one.
  14. troydennis2

    troydennis2 New Member

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    True the eco bricks are denser but we're just looking at the BTU per pound. There is no way of getting around the fact that the total energy potiental of 1 pound of eco bricks compressed hardwood saw dust equals the total energy potiental of 1 pound of traditional hardwood splits. I eventually figured this out after seeing the 8k BTU per pound number on one of the eco brick manufacturer webpages. My guess is they got that 2x number by comparing them to some undense wood that a cord weighs sub 2000 pounds.

    I've had a couple near over fires with the eco bricks trying to load up for long burns. My current method is to load 28 pounds of eco bricks to start and then feed it 14 pounds at a time as needed when the stove drops to around 400 degrees. I would never put 40+ pounds of those in a stove at once. My bet would be a melt down due to the increased surface area of the compressed sawdust.

    Hope my comments aren't coming across the wrong way. Just trying to share my experience with these things. I drank the koolaid and dropped $300 a ton for the eco bricks thinking each ton was equal to a cord. Lesson learned.
  15. rdust

    rdust Minister of Fire

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    I don't have a thermometer but use and IR gun, I find the hottest spot is usually above the cat pretty much just in front of the cat probe.
  16. weatherguy

    weatherguy Minister of Fire

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    I like some of the compressed log products better, they're denser and burn longer. I have to be careful when I burn those as they burn hot hot hot, I usually just add a couple to a wood load on the coldest of nights to get a longer, hotter burn.
  17. wkpoor

    wkpoor Minister of Fire

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    Thats the way I've been using them too. Add to a load of wood, 4 max to this point, and I've had good luck holding a nice long fire.
  18. GAMMA RAY

    GAMMA RAY Minister of Fire

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    I am guessing Mrs Smokey has Xanax in her possession at all times.... :smirk: :coolsmirk:
    Just sayin'....
  19. Patapsco Mike

    Patapsco Mike Feeling the Heat

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    A generic magnetic thermometer fits nicely right over the top of the door. Its a great way to tell how the stove is running from across the room, and over time I've figured out how I can tell when the cat is likely to be inactive based on this temp.
  20. SolarAndWood

    SolarAndWood Minister of Fire

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    I did it once when I first bought the stove because I didn't believe the marketing BS. I would have to have a lot of primo stuff laying around to consider doing it routinely. I always try to use the least desirable dry wood on hand that will get the job done. Saves the better stuff for when you need it.
  21. jeff_t

    jeff_t Minister of Fire

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    I picked up six packs of eco bricks at TSC this morning. I put three bricks on a fairly hot bed of coals at 10:30. Stovetop temp on the cheapy Rutland was 300, and the cat probe was at the top of the inactive zone. Took a bit of hot burning to get the cat up to temp. It seemed to settle in and burn nicely at 400, with the cat in the middle of the active zone. It seems like a full load in the BK would be controllable. It might burn forever.

    However...
    1. I'm not sure that they give off enough smoke to keep the cat active at low burn rates. Five hours later, stovetop was still at 400ish, but the cat had cooled off towards the bottom of active and I was getting a bit of smoke out of the chimney. I opened up the thermostat to 3, and it flamed up a bit, but stovetop and cat temps have actually dropped in the last 20 minutes, and still getting smoke. I think I'm going to have to add a few splits. It was fine earlier when the sun was shining and temps were in the mid 40s. Now the sun is gone, temp has dropped about 10°, and the wind is blowing 20-25 mph. Getting chilly.
    2. There is a lot of stuff blowing around in the firebox. I'm a bit concerned about fly ash and the cat.

    I'm not sure a full load is a good idea. It would be interesting, but I think I'll mix the rest of them in with cordwood, or burn them in the furnace when I'm goofing around in the basement.

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  22. weatherguy

    weatherguy Minister of Fire

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    My thoughts exactly, thats why I just use the eco bricks to burn down coals and I mix the compressed logs with other cord wood to get a hotter burn, I wouldnt use them exclusively in a cat stove though, defeats the purpose of the cat, they probably work great in a secondary burner.
  23. wkpoor

    wkpoor Minister of Fire

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    I think I can see where in a cat stove they might not be as good. But in my stove they behave fantastic. They burn with a dark blue flame and make really nice secondaries. Even though I still haven't braved putting in more than 4 at one time I'm thinking they work best added to a load of splits. 3-400 degrees is a pretty low temp to try and burn anything correctly so maybe a low slow burn isn't good. I added just a few small splits this morning at 10:00AM so I would have coals tonight and the stove has been 350 all day on just coals (which goes back to my theory its easy to keep a stove top in 3-400range for a very long time). Kinda hard to imagine keeping a stove that low continuosly if anything inside was actually putting off flame.
  24. BrowningBAR

    BrowningBAR Minister of Fire

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    Neat. I liked the Eco Brick test in the Blaze King.
  25. jeff_t

    jeff_t Minister of Fire

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    I can do it with wood. Maybe just a bit of flame now and then, but mostly just the cat burning the smoke. The bricks just don't make enough smoke to keep the cat going. It certainly wasn't pouring smoke out of the chimney, and probably not enough to be much of a creosote concern, even with somewhat regular use. I think I could stuff it full and the BK could keep it under control.
    The fly ash would be a big issue for a cat, I think. Probably a reason BK says to burn only wood.

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