Barrel Stove Kits

emt1581 Posted By emt1581, Sep 29, 2012 at 11:48 PM

  1. emt1581

    emt1581
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    Unless I built it into a 30 gallon or smaller barrel...I really don't have any use for one at this point in time. But they sure do interest me!!

    Under $50 for a wood stove.... personally, I find that pretty intriguing.

    I've seen a ton of reviews on them and a bunch of videos on youtube as well. Does anyone here have one or have experience with them?

    I do have a few questions that no reviews or vids have been able to answer.

    These don't seem to have gaskets on them. It wouldn't be a big deal to go to the stove shop and buy some then cement it on the door. Will this work to prevent smoke from escaping or will it prevent the door from closing?

    Is there really an airtight version? If so, what makes it airtight?

    The belly of the stove...some say they line it with playground sand, others with fire bricks. If with sand, how do you clean it and NOT scoop out the sand? If with bricks, just...how do you clean it?

    Does anyone use a steel grate to hold the logs above the ash area?

    Any other thoughts or advice in regard to them?

    Thanks!

    -Emt1581
     
  2. BrowningBAR

    BrowningBAR
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    Several of the members have used the barrel stoves. Audios Pantalones and Brother Bart, I think, have used barrel stoves in the past.
     
  3. emt1581

    emt1581
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    Ha!! There is actually a guy names goodbye pants!!?! That's great!! :)

    Thanks for the heads up!

    -Emt1581
     
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  4. emt1581

    emt1581
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    Anyone?

    This is a first. Usually threads get lots of replies.

    Thanks

    -Emt1581
     
  5. ScotO

    ScotO
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    They may have a use to someone, but no way would I want one in my house or shop. Not so sure the insurance company would like it, either.

    Just my 2 cents......
     
  6. Dune

    Dune
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    Yeah, they are a joke, from an earlier time, when the only competition was from "stoves" like Franklin Fireplaces, which were a huge improvement 250 years ago, now not so much. Like Scotty said, no way would I want one in my house or shop.
     
  7. firecracker_77

    firecracker_77
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    I think it might be nice to have one in a shop or pole barn. I wouldn't want one in a house.
     
  8. ScotO

    ScotO
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    The really big problem with barrel stoves is that barrels are very thin gauge steel.......not to mention, made out of cheap, recycled stuff in most cases. You would most definately have to firebrick the bottom, but you will still have the fire hitting the top of the barrel, and that steel ain't gonna last. I would highly recommend you NOT build one for the safety of your home, shop, and/or family......because that thing is gonna go bad when you ain't around to catch it......
     
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  9. Seasoned Oak

    Seasoned Oak
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    I can speak from experience on this as in have been using one for about 5 years on and off. NO you would not put one in your house,but for a garage or work shop they do have their place.
    I have roughly 7 wood burning appliances 4 EPA woodstoves 2 home made(from oil tanks)stoves and a barrel stove. The original lower barrel lasted 4 years in some very harsh conditions ,damp basement of a project house with a dirt floor. They burn with relatively little smoke and all the air leaks around the ungasketed door
    prevent them from burning too slow and forming creosote,but you cant load them too full or those same air leaks will cause an overheat condition. they throw an incredible amount of heat especially with the second barrel on top. i have used mine in the basement of a commercial bldg and now in the damp bsmt of a project house im rehabbing. Ill be glad to answer any questions about using them.
     
  10. emt1581

    emt1581
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    I greatly appreciate the experience being shared. As far as the time they last, this guy I think said his has lasted 20-ish years.



    But a cabin environment is much different than a musty/humid basement.

    Now if you gasket around the door, will that allow the door to close and still prevent smoke from escaping?

    Thanks again! :)

    -Emt1581
     
  11. Seasoned Oak

    Seasoned Oak
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    Dont want to gasket around the door,the air goes IN around the door not OUT. Your draft pulls air in .i never get smoke coming out around the door,if you did, that would mean you have about zero draft. I do not try use this stove as an airtight overnight stove. you would get creosote if you did IMO. I dont recommend this type of stove to heat a house unless your flat broke and its all you have,its not very pretty either.
     
  12. Seasoned Oak

    Seasoned Oak
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    Probably the lightest stove you will ever find,not more than 40 lbs or so. If i had a cabin like the one in the video i would use my Country Hearth 2000 EPA wood stove, great looking stove,you can cook on it ,.it burns the smoke no matter how low you close down the air,provides a great afterburn show and weighs just 275Lbs and cost just $499.
    PS I do have an old smaller cabin like the one in the video im going to replace soon and ill use the Country hearth stove there. Right now i have it in a 2 bedroom Apt.
     
  13. begreen

    begreen
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    Obviously he has a VERY tolerant wife.

    The main issue with a barrel stove is safety. Even in the video there appear to be some combustible trim less than 36" from the stove. We'll have to hope there is micore behind the stone veneer because it does not look ventilated. In a shop area a properly setup, vented and safely installed barrel stove should be fine. It won't be a clean burner, but it will be cheap.
     
  14. Seasoned Oak

    Seasoned Oak
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    Yes in the wrong hands(inexperienced users) a barrel stove could be dangerous.
     
  15. emt1581

    emt1581
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    Ok, so the kits' place are mainly in the shop/garage. I thought these were common in cabins and hunting lodges.

    I see what you're saying about the door. I guess gasketing it would not be smart.

    Again, just the price, the heat it throws, and the fact that I can build it (I LOVE projects) really appeals to me. But given what was shared I think I'll just pass for now. Maybe once I get my garage the way I want it, I'll look at it again.

    Thanks for the info! If there's any other things that would be important to know about these (good or bad) please share!

    -Emt1581
     
  16. n3pro

    n3pro
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    Use one at the cabin, never use one at the house. It has often glowed red, it's a bear to get going compared to the new stoves but it does put out some heat fast. Takes very little time to get that thin steel warm. I HATE not being able to see what's happening inside without opening the door and getting a face full of smoke.

    We have sand and rocks from the mountain on the bottom, no door gasket. Cheap and easy but not a long burn or safe heater. When I get it cranking with dry wood from here I can get a good smokeless burn from it unlike others who use it.
     

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  17. Seasoned Oak

    Seasoned Oak
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    looks like some serous heat affecting the paneling that the barrel is WAY TOO close to,not to mention the small table.
     
  18. Seasoned Oak

    Seasoned Oak
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    There are several reasons to put one in a cabin or hunting lodge
    1. They are cheap and less likely to get stolen than a $500-$1000 wood stove.
    2. They are light and sometimes cabins are far from a road.
    3.What they excel at is just what you need in a cabin ,which is fast heat and good output.
    I think they are relatively safe,but when installed too close to combustables like the one in the above pic any stove can be dangerous.
     
  19. begreen

    begreen
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    Given the 36" in all directions clearance requirement, and the size of the barrel itself, that seems like a lot of square ftg to sacrifice in a small cabin.
     
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  20. n3pro

    n3pro
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    This was taken in the summer so the table isn't there but yea, it amazed me nothing every happened. The history is kind of neat too. Used to have six people (rangers and firefighters) living there in the twenties rotating shifts on the fire tower or . Really would love to see some pics back in the day. I don't understand how that many people stayed there.
     
  21. Seasoned Oak

    Seasoned Oak
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    Looks like that paneling was pretty close to ignition a few times.
     
  22. Jason Hall

    Jason Hall
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    I could not trust all my toys to a thin barrel with cement sealing the door. I built this custom 28" x 4' x 5/8" thick pipe wood burner with a rope sealed door, 5/8" thick baffle Inside to keep the heat and flames from going up the chimney. Put a couple Inches of sand Inside along with a expanded metal grate to protect the bottom of the pipe. Some round adjustable vent's low in the door to regulate the fire. With a 4 foot long piece of Oak and some small limb wood around It, this baby will run you out of the barn lol. I still have lots of coals 24 hours later once I close her down after a weekend of burning. I have burned this stove for 10 years, and would not change a thing!
     

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  23. nate379

    nate379
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    As I figured the keyboard commandos on here would start the comments about that type of stove killing baby seals, busloads of nuns, etc.

    My Dad heated his workshop with one for several years. The barrels would last 4-5 years before they were junk. This was not heating the shop 24x7 by any means, just when we were out there. Maybe ran a cord of wood a year through it at most.

    Didn't have firebrick or anything to insulate it. Just would make it "heavy duty" by cutting a second barrel apart and welding it in to the 1 barrel so it was 2 layers thick.

    He now uses one of these http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200394664_200394664?cm_mmc=Google-pla-_-Heaters-_-Wood Stoves-_-172921&ci_sku=172921&ci_gpa=pla&ci_kw={keyword}&gclid=CIqA0JLQw7QCFeGDQgodYn0A5w
     
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  24. Jason Hall

    Jason Hall
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    Sorry, I did'nt mean to offend anyone. I just heard a lot of storys about how often the barrel needed to be changed. I know there are thin barrels, but sometimes you can find the thicker heavy duty ones. I put sand in mine because a friend with a double barrel stove said he made his lower barrel last alot longer with sand In the bottom.
     
  25. ScotO

    ScotO
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    Now THAT'S my kind of homebuilt stove.....total OVERKILL!

    Love it, Jason!
     

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